Monthly Archives: October 2012

my Halloween angel

Cici does not like getting dressed up…

can you tell???  LOL

candy candy candy…

in the midst of Sandy, and all that is happening on the east coast, my beloved NYC, and NJ,  CT, etc., here is an amazing and miraculous and inspirational tale… a tribute

http://michaelhingson.com/books/

the location of my father’s old store…Canal Street… it was a dark , dirty and hole in the wall store… with a basement filled with rats…  and old used machinery…industrial equipment… that he bought and sold

 

Happy Halloween!!!

 

 

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Filed under all you need is a dog, chocolate goodies, dog friendly, dog prayers, dog rescue, dog wear, dogs, halloween for dogs, keep pets safe, pet care, true love, Uncategorized

Traveling with Fido to Paris

Taking Fido to Paris

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2224816/Want-Fido-Paris-luxury-cruise-Make-sure-check-10-doggy-travel-Q-A-first.html


http://pinterest.com/ajr51594/kiddie-party-french-poodle/

dog trots globe

http://info.oic-books.com/dog-trots-globe-b

International Travel With Dogs Checklist

http://www.dogchannel.com/dog-training/travelwithdogs/international-travel-with-dogs-checklist.aspx

space, final dog park frontier

a solar system-themed dog park would include a canine version of a space shuttle, black hole tunnels, flying star jumps, water planet slash pads and for human “astronauts,” a solar room for comfortable observation.

http://articles.dailypilot.com/2012-10-24/news/tn-dpt-1025-beneful-purina-dream-dog-park-20121024_1_dog-park-dog-owners-costa-mesa-bark-park

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Filed under animal books, around the world, dog parks, dog travel, dogs, dogs around the world, K9 travel, keep pets safe, pet travel, Uncategorized

Pumpkin is good for dogs

    • Pumpkins are everywhere… I got some pumpkin butter from Trader Joe’s, have not tried it yet…Pumpkin is good for dog tummies…

      “adding two teaspoons of canned pumpkin in you dog’s food helps the digestion process”

      http://raisinghealthydogs.com/discover-the-health-benefits-of-canned-pumpkin-for-dogs

      I made my own version of this pumpkin meat loaf with ground turkey for cici and she loved it…Healthy Digestion Pumpkin Meatloaf

      AllNaturalPetCare.com

      1.5 pounds lean ground beef
      1 cup mashed or unseasoned canned pumpkin
      1 egg
      2 TBSP plain active yogurt
      1 tsp aloe juice
      1 tsp extra virgin olive oil
      1 cup of finely chopped parsley
      1/2 cup peas
      1 cup finely chopped cooked greens, such as turnip greens
      1.5 cups rice infant cereal
      1 tsp seaweed/algae
      1 tsp calcium montmorillonite clay
      1 tsp paprika
      1/2 tsp cinnamon
      * Optional supplements

      Preheat oven: 350F
      Mix all ingredients together in a large bowl.
      Pack firmly into loaf pan greased with extra virgin olive oil.
      Bake for about 1.5 hours.
      Cool & slice.
      This meatloaf freezes very well in convenient, single-slice portions

      this sounds yummy and I think can be adapted for dogs, too…

      Pumpkin Whoopie pie

    • This Wicked Pumpkin Whoopie Pies recipe is adapted from the recipe printed on the 207 Show’s web site on WCSH6.com (the NBC TV affiliate in Portland, Maine). I have not changed the substance of the recipe, but I have revised the wording a bit for clarity and added some of my own helpful tips and notes in italics.
  • I have broken out this recipe into two parts — the pumpkin whoopie pie shells recipeand the cream cheese whoopie pie filling recipe — to make it easier to follow since the cake shells and filling are made separately and then sandwiched together.

Ingredients

  • 1 15 oz can of pumpkin (not pumpkin pie filling)
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 cup vegetable oil
  • 2 cups brown sugar (firmly packed)
  • 2 tablespoons molasses
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon ginger
  • 3 cups all-purpose flour (heaping)

Instructions

1. Preheat oven to 350 °F (177 °C). Grease a large cookie sheet or line it with parchment paperand set it aside.

I always have needed two or more cookie sheets for mine, but it depends on the size of the scoops you use (which also determines the number of whoopie pies this recipe will make).2. Beat pumpkin, eggs, oil, and brown sugar together until fluffy with an electric mixerStir in the molasses.

A handheld mixer is fine.3. Combine the dry ingredients together and mix them into the pumpkin mixture until well blended. The batter will be thick (it should hold its shape when placed on the cookie sheet).

Make sure you measure 3 heaping cups of flour (approximately 3 1/2 level cups) and 2firmly packed cups of brown sugar so you get the correct amounts of each in the batter.

Also, feel free to use different spices if you prefer. For example, if you don’t care for ginger, you could substitute a smaller quantity of nutmeg.4. Scoop large, rounded spoonfuls of the cake batter onto the prepared cookie sheet(s), spacing them at least 2 inches apart.

Feel free to make your whoopie pie shells larger or smaller by changing the size of the mounds of batter. Remember to adjust the baking time accordingly and keep a close eye on the cakes so you don’t under- or over-bake them.

Both Amy and I recommend using an ice cream scoop to remove the same amount of cake batter for each whoopie pie shell and to form the batter into neat, uniform mounds. Using the ice cream scoop to portion and shape the batter helps you make cake shells that are uniformly sized with round edges that are easy to match up in pairs, rather than the unevenly sized shells with wonky edges that often form when anything other than a scoop is used.5. Bake the whoopie pie shells for 10-13 minutes (depending on the size scoop or spoon you used to portion the batter).

6. Cool the whoopie pie shells on a large wire cooling rack while you make the cream cheese filling with marshmallow creme / fluff (see recipe below).

7. When the whoopie pie shells have cooled, turn over half of them (flat side facing up) and place a scoop of cream cheese filling in the center of each cake shell. Top with the remaining cake shells.

Use the same ice cream scoop you used to portion out the cake batter to top half the cake shells with a mound of the cream cheese filling.

Ingredients

  • 6 oz. cream cheese
  • 1/2 stick (1/4 c.) unsalted butter (softened)
  • 2 cups confectioners sugar
  • 3 heaping tablespoons marshmallow creme (such as Marshallow Fluff)
  • 2 teaspoons water

Instructions

1. Place all ingredients in a mixing bowl and beat with an electric mixer until fluffy.

Note: 3 heaping tablespoons of marshmallow creme is equal to approximately 4 level tablespoons of fluff.2. Sandwich pairs of cooled pumpkin whoopie pie shells together with scoops of this cream cheese filing.

http://www.squidoo.com/pumpkin-whoopie-pies-delicious-halloween-and-fall-treats#module162356029

Pumpkin Bread Recipe

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 1/2 cups (200g) flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon of salt
  • 1 cup (200 g) sugar
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 cup (240 ml) pumpkin purée*
  • 1/2 cup (120 ml) olive oil
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon allspice
  • 1/2 cup (120 ml) chopped walnuts

* To make pumpkin purée, cut a pumpkin in half, scoop out the seeds and stringy stuff, lie face down on a foil or Silpat lined baking sheet. Bake at 350°F until soft, about 45 min to an hour. Cool, scoop out the flesh. Freeze whatever you don’t use for future use. Or, if you are working with pumpkin pieces, roast or boil them until tender, then remove and discard the skin.

METHOD

1 Preheat oven to 350°F (180°C). Sift together the flour, salt, sugar, and baking soda.

2 Mix the pumpkin, oil, eggs, 1/4 cup of water, and spices together, then combine with the dry ingredients, but do not mix too thoroughly. Stir in the nuts.

3 Pour into a well-buttered 9x5x3 inch loaf pan. Bake 50-60 minutes until a thin skewer poked in the very center of the loaf comes out clean. Turn out of the pan and let cool on a rack.

Can easily double the recipe.

Yield: Makes one loaf.

http://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/pumpkin_bread/

http://icanhas.cheezburger.com/dogs/tag/pumpkin/page/4#post-3514484736

Pumpkin Peanut Butter Dog Treats
2 1/2 cups whole wheat flour
2 large eggs
2/3 cup pumpkin purée, canned or fresh
3 tbsps peanut butter

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Place all ingredients in the mixing bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a paddle attachment. Mix on medium for about a minute or until the dough looks like a bunch of little dough balls. If you pinch a piece and it crumbles, add a little water. If it’s really sticky, it’s too wet and you’ll need to add a little flour. Gather the dough together and form into a ball. Place on a lightly floured work surface and roll it out to about 1/4-inch thickness. You can either use a cookie cutter to cut out cute shapes or use a knife to cut squares or strips. I am pretty sure the dog doesn’t care, but I rather prefer the cute shapes. I gather the scraps together and roll them out again and again until I’ve used up the dough. Place the cookies on a baking sheet. They can be crowded pretty close together since they don’t expand much. Bake 15-20 minutes for softer treats or 30 minutes for hard treats (Kaweah likes crunchy treats, just like her person – me). Let cool completely. Makes 100+ 1-inch heart-shaped dog treats.

http://userealbutter.com/2012/04/18/pumpkin-peanut-butter-dog-treats-recipe/

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Domestic Violence and animal abuse

RedRover
(www.redrover.org), a national animal protection nonprofit based in
California, is bringing attention to the connection between animal
abuse and family violence during Domestic Violence Awareness Month by
offering information about grants available to domestic violence shelters.

According to the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence, more
than 70 percent of pet-owning women entering domestic violence shelters
reported that their batterer had injured, killed or threatened family
pets for revenge or psychological control. As many as 48 percent of
domestic violence victims are unable to escape their abusers because
they fear what will happen to their pets when they leave. Only three
percent of shelters can house pets on-site; a portion provide off-site
housing referrals while the majority of shelters do not offer any
resources at all.

RedRover offers aid to victims of domestic violence and their pets
through the RedRover Relief program. This program provides financial
support for veterinary care and boarding to enable domestic violence
victims to leave their batterers without having to leave their pets
behind, and new in 2012, the program provides grants to domestic
violence shelters to enable them to fund the creation of on-site space
to house pets.

“Sadly, many domestic violence victims stay in abusive homes because
they are afraid to leave their pets,” said Nicole Forsyth, RedRover
President and CEO. “Their pets are often also victims of abuse,
suffering from injuries and neglect. RedRover Relief grants make it
possible for victims to safely escape, reassured that their pets are
protected.”

Donations to the RedRover Relief program have funded critical care and
shelter for animals displaced by family violence. In one case, RedRover
awarded a $300 grant to a woman seeking a protective order against her
husband, who had threatened to drive her cats into the woods and
abandon them. Another applicant finally found the courage to leave her
abusive husband, but said she would sleep in her car before she gave up
her elderly pug. And in another case, a grant from RedRover paid for
two months of boarding for a family’s dog while they sought child- and
pet-friendly housing after fleeing a very dangerous situation.

Increased outreach and greater public awareness on domestic violence
issues have led to a 70 percent rise in applications for the RedRover
Relief program in the last year.

RedRover Relief grants can help  family violence shelters include pets.

Learn more at www.redrover.org/domestic.

Founded in 1987, RedRover focuses on bringing animals out of crisis and
into care through a variety of programs, including emergency animal
sheltering and disaster relief services, financial assistance for
urgent veterinary care and humane education. Learn more at
www.redrover.org.

 

beyond the myth free til nov 2

http://www.hulu.com/watch/417334

“Patrick’s Law, which toughens the civil and criminal penalties for animal cruelty, passed the state Senate this afternoon.

“The bill is named after Patrick the Pitbull, a dog that was starved, thrown down a garbage chute and left for dead in Newark in 2011. The legislation was praised by animal rights activists during a committee hearing last month, and it received unanimous support in the Senate today.

“If the bill becomes law, abusing an animal or depriving it of food, water or other necessities would be a fourth-degree crime. It is currently a disorderly persons offense. If the animal dies as a result of the abuse, the crime would be increased to the third degree.

“The law would increase the civil penalty for animal abuse to a fine of $1,000 to $3,000 for a first offense, and $3,000 to $5,000 for a subsequent offense.”

http://blog.northjersey.com/thepoliticalstate/5367/senate-passes-patricks-law-increasing-animal-cruelty-penalties/

Blog Hop time…thanks to Life with DogsTwo Little Cavaliers and Confessions of the Plume…  grab the blog hop code

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Tips for Howloween

With Halloween just around the corner, I’d like to give you a few reminders or suggestions on how to help your animal family through the festivities.  This can be a stressful time for many animals and there are ways to mitigate that. I’ve also included some photos just for fun.

1.  If your animal is stressed or scared by strange noises or unusual looking people, be sure to keep them securely locked in a quiet room in your house on Halloween. All those loud kids in scary costumes can be really upsetting.  This will also ensure that your cat or dog doesn’t bolt out the door when the trick or treaters show up.  A nice room with some calming music would be a perfect place for the evening.

2. You can also start giving them some Rescue Remedy (just three drops) in the water dish each day, for a few days before the 31st.  That will help to release any stress or anxiety and keep them calmer.

3. Don’t forget that dogs are allergic to chocolate, so if you have a big bowl of candy at the door waiting for the trick or treaters, be sure that your pup doesn’t help himself.  The same is true for bags of goodies your kids bring home from their rounds.  It’s really easy for dogs to get into the chocolate right now and that could be a bad situation. Xylitol, a sugar free sweetener, is very poisonous to dogs and some other small mammals, and is found in many candies and baked good. Signs of chocolate toxicity include tremors, nervousness, vomiting, diarrhea, increased heart rate and sometimes seizures and death. If you suspect that your dog has eaten something toxic and he exhibits any of these symptoms, call your vet right away.

4. The ingredients in candy are not the only problem.  Many dogs will eat the wrappers and sticks and this can cause an intestinal blockage.  So keep the candy far, far away.

5. Don’t leave lighted candles or jack-o-lanterns where the animals can get to them. Cats and dogs may stick their nose over the flame to investigate, or they can tip them over.

6.  Some animals love to “dress up” and others hate it. Don’t make your animal friend wear a costume unless they really love it. Never leave an animal in a costume alone – they can chew it up and ingest it, get it caught on something or hurt themselves trying to get out of it.

7. Halloween is a great time to drop by your local shelter with some treats for the cats and dogs waiting for a home. It’s even better if you can come in costume and brighten the staff’s day.

Halloween can be a fun time for people and animals and with a little planning, everyone can have a safe and enjoyable time.

Note:   I would add that if you have a black cat, make sure that you keep it indoors. Pranksters have been known to harm black cats during this holiday so keep your kitties safe.

10 more tips from Victoria Stilwell

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Pit Bulls and Addicts

been enjoying the new season of Pit Bulls and Parolees…now that they have moved to New Orleans…

https://www.facebook.com/PitBullsandParolees/app_378878488848240

last night, there was an inspiring new show on afterwards, Addicts & Animals...

Addicts & Animals’ hero, Phil Aguilar, aka “Chief,” has made it his mission to help drug addicts, but he does it his way. He and his family run an in-home sobriety program that uses the responsibility and joy of pet ownership as a means for recovery. Once a heroine addict himself, Chief swoops up addicts from the doorsteps of Hell and helps them get their lives back, with the help of a few tail-wagging companions.

He rescues death row dogs/shelter dogs… which is very cool…and each addict, when ready, gets to take care of a dog.

Healing Trauma

The relationship between humans and pets has always been a close, cherished bond. Animals have a magical way of easing stress and relieving strain for individuals in need – even drug addicts. Research suggests that the hormones activated by drug abuse are also elevated by animal contact. Dopamine and serotonin levels increase with drugs like cocaine and heroin; the same feel good hormones increase from healthy activities, like taking care of a dog.

Health benefits of having a pet include:
• Lowers blood pressure
• Reduces stress
• Fights depressions

Animal-assisted therapy is being used in a wide variety of settings to help people with acute and chronic illnesses. This is based on the many physiological and psychological benefits documented in patients during interactions with animals. These include lowered blood pressure and heart rate, increased beta-endorphin levels, decreased stress levels, reduced feelings of anger, hostility, tension and anxiety, improved social functioning, and increased feelings of empowerment, trust, patience and self-esteem. Animal therapy is looked upon as both a learning and healing experience.

How can animals help with addiction? There is more than one reason for utilizing animals to help in addiction recovery.

The first reason is that animals like dogs and horses exhibit total emotional honesty, something that addicts need to learn themselves. A horse, for example, will show signs of fear when afraid, aggression when angry, exploration when curious, rather than trying to conceal these emotions in any way.

In addition, animals like horses reflect our emotions. If we are anxious near them, they will be anxious also. If we are relaxed, they will relax as well. This kind of feedback is especially helpful for addicts who are working on getting more in tune with what they feel. An addict may not be aware that he is feeling particularly tense, for example, when working with a horse. But the horse’s unease may alert him to that fact. The addict can then respond by concentrating on relaxing.

Horses are large and somewhat intimidating animals. How an addict responds to and behaves around the horse can tell an addictions therapist a lot about how this person interacts in other relationships. For example, someone who is aggressive, in personal relationships, will generally demonstrate the same behavior when working with a horse.

Another addict who is shy, reserved, or afraid to speak her mind will usually have a very difficult time setting boundaries with a horse. The horse will learn to respect those who earn it, and weak requests will not get that respect from a horse.

The horse is therefore a great teacher of assertiveness, the midpoint between aggression and passivity. A horse will often respond in fear or refused cooperation to aggression. They will generally ignore passive requests. Somewhere in the middle is assertiveness, the ability of the addict to be clear and honest about what he needs, without being overbearing.

Outside of therapy, animals can help a person in recovery cope with stress. Animal studies regularly demonstrate that the mere presence in the home of a dog or cat can lower a person’s blood pressure. Just petting a dog or cat can decrease heart rate, respiratory rate, and other symptoms of stress.

With stress being so imperative for addicts in recovery to manage, having a pet can be a big help in the recovery process. Pets can also help addicts work on service and compassion, as they learn to care for and love an animal that is dependent upon them for support. All of these benefits make animals an important addition to recovery.

As an adjunct to more traditional types of addiction treatment, animal-assisting therapy works by helping those who have been battling the demons of substance abuse find a way to step outside of themselves and discover deeper meaning and purpose by providing vital assistance to other living creatures who desperately need love and companionship. For animals and recovering addicts alike, animal-assisting therapy is a win-win situation.
Acts of kindness and selflessness by their very nature put us in contact with the best of ourselves, and this can make them incredibly valuable for recovering addicts who spent so many years selfishly putting their own needs above those of everyone else. Addicts and alcoholics repeatedly use and manipulate people in order to satisfy their desire for relief from the symptoms of addiction, and besides their need to detoxify their bodies they also need to cleanse their wounded spirits to remove the contamination left behind by their self-centered and abusive past behaviors.
Animal-assisting therapy can help even the most broken and jaded person rediscover his or her deepest inner sources of compassion, which is an essential step for any addict who hopes to finally ascend from the pit of despair and shame that dominated his or her existence for so long. Before those with a history of substance abuse can hope to find lasting sobriety, they must first rebuild their self-esteem to the point where they actually feel strong enough to accomplish difficult things and worthy enough to deserve the happiness and peace that was denied them during their years of battling against alcoholism or drug addiction.
Animal-assisting therapy is all about fixing bodies, minds, and souls that have been damaged by abuse and neglect. Above all else, recovering addicts and alcoholics need something new and worthwhile to live for, and a commitment to caring for animals who have been cast aside can provide vital meaning and purpose where before there was only dependency and hopelessness.

Therapy dogs, like Peaches the pit bull pictured above, typically work with their owners in hospitals, nursing homes, schools and rehabilitation centers. They play with abused children, give affection to the elderly, help the critically ill to laugh and forget their pain for a while, and sometimes provide a warm lick to wipe the tears away.  The presence of dogs provides a sense of normalcy and reassurance to troubled individuals. Acceptance and non-judgment are perhaps the two most important gifts that these animals can offer. To dogs, humans are “perfect” just the way we are.

Shame, guilt, secrecy and hopelessness create a fertile ground for self-loathing, despair and an abnormal fear response. In an environment where people have proven to not be trustworthy – or, in the addict’s case if they cannot trust themselves – trained therapy dogs can potentially bridge the gap and make a difference in one’s recovery.

Benefits:

  • Stabilized and Improve social skills by learning gentle ways to communicate and handle the animal, such as feeding and grooming.
  • Brighten affect, mood, pleasure and affection while playing with the animal.
  • Reduce abusive behavior and learn appropriate touch.
  • Improve ability to express feelings by identifying how an animal might feel in a certain situation and/or recalling a client’s history with pets (sharing stories of grief or funny events).
  • Reduce anxiety and fear by forming a bond of love and comfort with the animal.
  • Learn how to better communicate with people by talking to the animal.
  • Develop a cooperative plan to accomplish something with the animal.

Cynthia Chandler, author of Animal Assisted Therapy in Counseling, points out that the positive benefits to be gained from therapy can be more immediate when a therapy pet is involved, especially when working with a resistant client. The desire to be with the therapy pet can sometimes override the client’s initial defenses (Chandler, 2005). She further points to the natural relationship that occurs between dogs and humans which can result in quick bonding and trust between the client and dog in a therapeutic setting. According to Chandler, this bond between the pet and the client also helps to facilitate a bond with the therapist, as the feelings of affection and trust for the pet are eventually transferred to the pet’s therapist. Screening is required for clients in recovery who have a history of violence, animal abuse, animal phobias or allergies. However, most clients and pets will benefit from this type of therapy (Chandler, 2005).

According to Dr. Joseph Volpicelli and the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), “20 million Americans suffer from alcohol abuse disorders, yet only about 2 million are in any kind of treatment program.”

Stories of getting sober and being aided in staying sober fill the halls of AA and other recovery centers, and now, with the expansion of the field of AAT, perhaps the use of animals at treatment centers will one day become commonplace.

Love is considered by many to be the universal healer. Is it any less comforting if the source is not human? According to a study done at the Waltham Center for Pet Nutrition in Leicestershire, England, a pet’s love can help reduce anxiety, lower blood pressure and triglyceride levels, moderate the effects of stress, and build a sense of empathy. Love creates a bond that undeniably aids in the health, happiness and a sense of belonging that makes life worth living (Meunier, 2003). These nurturing qualities can easily be translated into a treatment plan for a recovering addict.

Imagine all of the shelter animals that can be saved and given new life/loving homes when more animals are utilized to help people recover from addiction, illnesses, war, trauma and injuries, PTSD and more…

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/21134540/vp/40471379#40471379

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Halloween costumes and treats

boo

http://animal.discovery.com/features/halloween/ideas/homemade-pet-costumes.html

doggie pumpkins

http://www.bhg.com/halloween/pumpkin-carving/pumpkin-carving-stencils-of-favorite-dogs/#page=1

 

Pawsome pumpkins!

Ingredients:1 cup oat flour
1/2 cup rolled oats
1/4 cup peanut butter, organic is best!
1 tsp baking powder
1 cup waterDirections: Preheat oven tp 325 degrees. Combine dry ingredients into a large mixing bowl. Add the peanut butter and water. Mix the ingredients together until it forms a dough.Then roll the dough into one quarter inch thickness. Cut into any fun Halloween shape, like pumpkins, witches, bats, or ghosts!You can even whip up some yogurt icing, add a dab of food coloring and start decorating!
Blog Hop time…thanks to Life with DogsTwo Little Cavaliers and Confessions of the Plume…  grab the blog hop code

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Filed under all you need is a dog, dog treats, dog wear, dogs, pet blog hop, Uncategorized