cats and dogs and kids, oh my

9 Things Parents Should Know About Cats and Kids

The funny thing is that I was just talking on Facebook to a friend I have never met about cats and dogs and the different energies, benefits of both types of animals as pets. We love them all and she has a few cats and a dog and is going to be getting another dog, who is being trained to help her daughter with her peanut allergy. Cats are wonderful beings and can be trained, despite conventional thinking. If Cici did not have cat issues, I would have brought a cat into our home for us. On Must Love Cats on Animal Planet last week I saw a show where people were teaching cats to do agility and cats were competing at shows.  Cats are much smarter than people give them credit for. And you can walk them on a leash, too.

Here are a few of Nikhi’s fur babies, are these the cutest fur babies ever???

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Alfie and Oliver, the cat…

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Well, after my Facebook chat, I received this gift guest blog post and decided to post it here. Enjoy !

If you’re considering adding a pet to the family, cats can seem like the ideal choice. They don’t have to be taken for walks, housebreaking is a breeze and their largely independent attitude means that they don’t need the same level of attention and companionship as a puppy or even a full-grown dog. Households that count small children among their number, however, should take a few things under consideration before adding a feline friend to the family.

  1. Growing Up Together isn’t Always the Best Route – Common advice for parents considering a new pet dictates the addition of a kitten when children are still young. This recommendation is given with the assumption that the two of them will “grow up together.” In fact, adult cats are usually much better choices for young children than kittens. The fragility and delicate nature of a kitten’s physiology does little to protect them from accidental rough treatment, which may be difficult for very young children to understand.
  2. Proper Handling is Imperative – Before you adopt a cat, you should make sure that your child is well informed about safe and proper handling. In addition to running the risk of hurting the cat or causing it to become withdrawn, wary and antisocial in reaction to being handled roughly too often, you’re also increasing the chances of a hiss, swat or bite that turns your child off from cats altogether.
  3. Supervision is Required – Because cats are typically very independent, it can be easy to forget that they still need to be supervised all the time when they’re in the same room as a young child. If you’re present when a child pets too roughly or picks Fifi up by her neck, you can put a stop to the behavior before someone is injured or gets upset.
  4. Declawing isn’t the Kindest Answer – In preparation for bringing a cat into the house, some new owners opt to have their feline friends declawed. What most of them don’t realize, however, is just how cruel and painful the process is for cats. Rather than having a part of the cat’s body removed because you’re nervous about scratched furniture or children, you may just want to reconsider the idea of adding a cat to the family in the first place. The human equivalent of declawing would be the removal of each of your fingers at the last knuckle.
  5. Cats Can Help Kids Learn Responsibility – When your child helps to feed and water his new cat, clean the  litter box and look after her, he’s learning very valuable lessons in responsibility and compassion. There are plenty of reasons why adding a cat to the family may be the perfect choice for your family, but this is potentially the best.
  6. Sharing is Caring, But Not When it Comes to Chocolate – You may be aware of the fact that chocolate is toxic for dogs, but it’s just as dangerous for cats to ingest. Make sure that your child knows that even though she wants to share her chocolate candy, doing so can make her new cat very, very sick.
  7. Cat Scratch Fever isn’t Just a Classic Rock Song – If the only thing that comes to mind when you hear the term “cat scratch fever” is an old Ted Nugent record, you’ll probably want to brush up on the subject before you bring a cat into a house with children. Cat scratch disease is caused by the bacteria Bartonella henselae, and is spread through bites and scratches from an infected cat. While it’s generally not serious, cat scratch disease can cause fatigue, fever, headache, swelling of the lymph nodes and overall discomfort. If your child is showing any of these symptoms, it’s best to inform his doctor that you do have a cat in the family.
  8. The Great Outdoors isn’t All That Great – Your child needs to spend plenty of time outdoors engaged in physically active play. Your cat, however, has a statistically higher chance of living a long life and dying of natural causes if it spends its life indoors. Outdoor cats are much more likely to be injured or even killed by other animals and moving vehicles than their indoor brethren.
  9. Patience is a Virtue – When you first bring your new cat home, it’s normal for your child to be so excited that she wants to spend every moment with her new friend. As a parent, it’s important for you to understand that your cat will need time to adjust to new surroundings, and may be a bit standoffish until he’s more comfortable in your home.

Cats are beautiful and gracious creatures with their own individual personalities and quirks. For some families, they’re irreplaceable members of the household that are dearly treasured. Others may find them too aloof and disinterested, depending upon the temperaments involved. Before making the decision to bring a cat home, you should make sure that the lifestyle of your household is conducive to caring for a cat.  (Editors note:  Please adopt a cat or dog or pet from your local animal rescue or shelter, ie, save a life and spay and neuter your pets, thank you).

http://www.summernanny.com/blog/9-things-parents-should-know-about-cats-and-kids/

Blog Hop time…thanks to Life with DogsTwo Little Cavaliers and Confessions of the Plume…  grab the blog hop  link

 

 

5 Comments

Filed under adoption, Adventure, animal planet, animal rescue, animals, blog hop, cats, children and dogs, dogs, family friendly, four paws up, guest blog, K9 approved, keep pets safe, pet adoption, pet blog hop, pet care, tip, Uncategorized

5 responses to “cats and dogs and kids, oh my

  1. barkandchatter

    Great advice! I’ve been roommies with both cats and dogs for years, and my observation is that people train dogs, and cats train people! Meow!

  2. Woof! Woof! All of our friends have cats. Yes there are advantages of having a cat instead of a dog. Just lucky that my family choose to have a dog (ME). Golden Thanks for sharing your guest blog post. Lots of Golden Woofs, Sugar

  3. Loy

    This is great advice. Thanks for sharing and Happy Saturday!

  4. Great article and super advice. I have always had (and loved) both cats and dogs also. I especially like the advice about an older cat for a very young child. I adopted a 2 year old cat from the Austin City Pound (a kill shelter at the time) many years ago when my daughter was 3 years old. I selected this particular cat because he let my daughter climb right into the big cage with him and no hissing, no claws…just very loud purring and lots of affection. We decided he was the one for us and never looked back. Had him for 16 wonderful years, and probably saved his life with our adoption.

  5. Jackson

    Stellar advice and info! I grew in a house full of cats and dogs, and own three dogs today. I have ten acres in Monroe County, IN, home to my dogs and a gang of stray cats. Some other good advice is pet insurance. Don’t introduce any new pets to your home without it. We’ve got trupanion btw. Speaking of chocolate, my dachshund got a hold of some last year and I rushed him to the vet. They fed him tons of charcoal and he puked it out. I posted photos of his blackened beard on my facebook page. Funny stuff!

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