Category Archives: adoption

Love, Hope and Forgiveness

Heroes Come in Different Species

 

An Abused Pit Bull and Human Survivor Share Hope and Healing

Some people see a pit bull and go running for the hills fearing that they will be maimed due to the sensationalizing of (and often untrue) pit bull attack stories overreported by the media. Then there are dog lovers and advocates who see a dog just like any other dog. Donna Lawrence is one of the latter. Yes, even after she WAS attacked by a pit bull.

 

A recent survey of people who admitted to having negative opinions of pit bulls, 60 percent of the participants cited media reports as the basis of their negative opinions.

 

“One person and one animal can make a powerful difference in the world,” said Donna. She survived an attack and later adopted an abused pit bull puppy who was set on fire. Her courage and commitment to dogs inspires people around the world.

 

Donna and Susie’s story of Love, Hope, Courage and Forgiveness has been made into a movie called Susie’s Hope which recently aired on UPTV.

 

The DVD will be released this fall, but you can preorder through Best Buy now!

 

http://www.bestbuy.com/site/susies-hope-dvd/25346296.p?id=3251052&skuId=25346296&st=Susie%27s%20Hope&lp=1&cp=1

 

Movie trailer:

 

 

Donna thought Susie was dead when she found her in a park. “My heart melted the instant I saw her. I had so much compassion for her. I saw this six week old puppy with third degree burns all over her body and I couldn’t understand how someone could do this to her. I had never seen abuse like this before. She was so little and frail with scars all over her body. Her ears were burned off. She had broken bones. Susie needed a lot of love and protection,” Donna explained.

 

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“As I held her, covered in bandages, she kissed my face.  She was so loving and just wanted me to hold her. I was captivated. We were kindred spirits. I could relate to her pain and suffering. She was wrongfully attacked. We both had a lot of physical and emotional scars and fears to conquer.”

A few weeks before she met Susie, Donna had been feeding her neighbor’s abandoned and abused pit bull who was chained up 24/7. One day the dog became aggressive and attacked Donna’s legs. She thought she was going to die.

It is important to note that the attack on Donna was not because the dog was a pit bull. The attack fit the profile cited in a recent report published in the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association (JAVMA)/  The report discusses dog bite prevention and cites factors involved in attacks. Breed is not a factor. The dog that attacked Donna was chained up (a resident dog not a pet), abused, neglected, not neutered and no able bodied person was there to intervene.

“I was working through some serious emotional turmoil, and one weekend when I had Susie in my care, I got the tragic news that I would never be able to have children—as a result of the attack. I cried all the way home from the doctor’s office.  When we got home, it was like God spoke to me,” Donna recalled. “You see that puppy, she has been abused, set on fire, and left for dead. Yet she is forgiving. She is not living in the past. She is happy and thankful to be alive.  She is moving on with her life and so can you. I want you to adopt her. I have big plans for you–bigger than you can imagine. And you will never fear dogs again.”  So, I listened to God. I let go of my hurt and anger and trusted in God that together we would bring healing to people and animals.”

Pit bulls and their bad reputation never bothered Donna. She considers pit bulls “loyal and affectionate dogs with loving hearts.”  Before the pit bull that attacked her and adopting Susie, Donna rescued another pit bull named Samson. “He was so sweet; I’d take him to the salon with me every day and he’d sit by the dryers while the gals got their hair done.  He’d look over their shoulders as if he was reading the magazines with them!”

Wanting justice (a punishment to fit the crime) for what happened to Susie, Donna was concerned that Susie’s abuser would go free. Animal cruelty laws were very lenient in North Carolina at the time and had not been changed in a very long time. The person who abused Susie was only given jail time because the court could charge him with destroying someone else’s property. Susie was treated as property rather than a living being. So, Donna helped to pass Susie’s Law with stiffer fines and jail time for animal abusers.

It  was a team effort. “In March 2010, we canvassed the state of North Carolina, sharing Susie’s story. We sent out emails, postcards and letters with our “request for change.”  We took Susie before the city council and county commissioners Votes were unanimous in the House and Senate (after taking one look at Susie).  The Bill was signed by Governor Perdue in June 2010, with Susie’s paw of approval. The law was put into effect in December 2010.”

“Remember, serial killers practice abusing animals first and then move on to innocent children and adults,” Donna declared.

Now, Donna has high hopes for the impact of the movie. “We hope that Susie’s Hope will start a nationwide movement, to bring national public and legislative awareness, to change laws in every state. Maybe even a national law to protect all animals. Some states have great animal cruelty laws, and then, some don’t. I hope the movie will motivate others to make a difference and change in their own state, or hometown, for the sake of the animals. I also hope the movie will motivate people to never give up on the things they are passionate about.”

Through Susie’s Hope™ the non-profit organization, Donna and Susie teach people how to treat animals properly.

 

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“Susie and I are on a mission to do all we can to stand up for the rights of animals. It is time for a change in our society. We need to stop turning the other cheek to abuse and start reporting abuse whenever we see it. We need to crack down on puppy mills and backyard breeding. Fight for changes in your own state. Let’s get animals off of chains and make them a part of the family. We hope people will take care of their pets, and learn how to be safe around them, to love and respect them.”

When Susie and Donna visit schools, “I usually ask the children to offer Susie a treat. I teach kids in the schools how to approach animals,and to always ask permission. Not all animals enjoy kids running up to them and getting in their face, or riding them like a horse. Children need to learn at an early age to respect an animal’s space and how to gently approach them.

“People need to understand animals have feelings and emotions just like we do. They feel pain, loneliness and rejection, and they know when they are loved–and when they are not.”

Susie turned five years old in June (2014). “Susie loves chasing her brother and sister dogs around in the yard. She loves going to work with me at the salon.  (She gives the clients kisses and shows off with her favorite tricks–riding a skateboard, jumping through a hula hoop, playing dead, counting, reading, pointing to colors, and more). She loves to eat peanut butter. She loves riding in the car and traveling.  I think she likes being my friend. Susie does like other doggies, but it takes her a bit to warm up to them–she has to make sure she can trust them.

“Susie and I are on a mission to do all we can to stand up for the rights of animals. It is time for a change in our society. We need to stop turning the other cheek to abuse and start reporting abuse whenever we see it in our neighborhoods, communities or our workplace. We need to crack down on puppy mills and backyard breeding. We want to encourage everyone to fight for changes in your own state and communities. Let’s get animals off of chains and make them a part of the family. We hope people will continue to educate children as well as adults in their own communities how to take care of their pets, and how to be safe around them, to love them and respect them,” she concluded.

Susie is a nominee in the American Human Association Hero Dog Awards contest. As the 2014 AHA Therapy Dog, please consider voting for her.  (Visit www.susieshope.com orwww.susieshope-nc.org for more information).

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Susie’s Hope on TV

This is an incredible week for pit bulls with Pit Bull Week at HuffPost Green and this movie, wow !!!

A pit bull attack survivor adopts an abused pit bull … this just makes me cry. The courage exhibited by Donna Lawrence is truly inspirational and healing. (Imagine if someone else who shall remain nameless went on this path instead of the path of hate and revenge, oh well, everyone chooses what they do).

The movie Susie’s Hope, the true story of Greensboro, NC’s Donna Lawrence (played by Emmanuelle Vaugier, “Two and A Half Men,” “CSY: NY”), a natural-born animal lover who barely survives a ferocious, life-threatening attack by an abused pit bull but learns to overcome her new fear of dogs and move forward in the most unexpected way – by adopting and caring for a brutally abused, abandoned pit bull-mix puppy named Susie.  Susie’s Hope premieres exclusively on UP on Sunday, August 3 at 8:00 p.m. EST / 7:00 p.m. PST.

Susie’s Hope is an inspirational, hopeful movie about unexpected second chances and compassion,” said Sophia Kelley, senior vice president of programming, UP.  “After almost losing her life, Donna Lawrence finds the strength to face her newfound fear of dogs and motivate a state to pass legislation to help prevent cruelty to animals. Susie’s Hope is a truly touching film that’s guaranteed to uplift all who watch it.”

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Susie’s Hope recounts the story of Donna Lawrence (Emmanuelle Vaugier), a long-time dog enthusiast and caretaker, who warily observes the neglect and deterioration of a nearby neighbor’s pit bull and volunteers to help.  When the owner moves and abandons the dog, Donna is left behind as the animal’s caretaker.  Every day, she places a bowl of food in the doghouse and walks away.  During a routine visit, the fearful dog attacks Donna without warning, pinning her to the ground, viciously clenching her at the throat.  Donna calls out to God and finds the strength to throw the dog off and roll away.  After being rushed to the emergency room by a neighbor, the doctors tell her that she is lucky to have all of her limbs as well as her life.  Donna receives 45 stitches in her leg and spends the next two months learning to walk again.

With the help of her husband Roy (Burgess Jenkins), Donna heals physically but the emotional scars of the traumatic attack leave her shaken and frightened until she meets Susie.  Donna’s close friend, Ramona (Andrea Powell) is who initially comes across Susie, a pit bull-mix puppy that had been beaten, set on fire, and left to die by her former owner. Both having experienced vicious attacks, Donna and Susie share mutual fears and learn to conquer them together.  Donna makes peace with her wrongful attack and Susie forgives humans for hers. Spearheading a group of like-minded individuals, the pair ultimately inspire and move an entire state to take a legislative stand against animal cruelty through the passage of “Susie’s Law,” which strengthened North Carolina’s penalties for animal abuse into a Class H felony.

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About Donna Lawrence and Susie:

Donna and Susie have worked to overcome their mutual traumatic experiences to inspire and minister to others (human and canine).  Donna and Susie visit schools, nursing homes, churches, burn centers and organizations, and attend pet adoption fairs and fundraisers to motivate and educate people surrounding animal cruelty.  Captivating the hearts of those that learn of Susie’s story, Susie was recently recognized as the 2014 Therapy Dog winner for The American Humane Association Hero Dog AwardsTM. The commendable recognition has placed Susie in the national finals (as one of the eight finalist contenders) of the 2014 American Humane Association Hero Dog Awards™.  To vote for Susie, visit: http://www.herodogawards.org/vote?nominee=35549916.  Voting ends Monday, September 15, 2014 at 12 p.m. EST.

For more information about the Susie’s Law and the Susie’s Hope™ non-profit organization, which promotes education and awareness of the care and responsibility required in owning pets as well as animal safety around unfamiliar animals:

·        www.susieshope-nc.org/susieslaw.htm

·        www.susieshope.com/nonprofit

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Filed under adoption, animal abuse, animal books, animal stars, bigotry against dogs, canine rehabilitation, dogs, pet care, pit bull, politics, Uncategorized

Pit Bull Week

Are you following Pit Bull week on HuffPost?  You should be…

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HuffPost Green is launching a week-long, community-driven effort to bust the myths and raise awareness about pit bulls, a maligned “breed” that often bears the brunt of dated, discriminatory legislation that can make it near impossible for these dogs to find a forever home.

You can follow along with HuffPost Pit Bull Week here:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/news/pit-bulls/

 or on Facebook and Twitter where we’ll be using the hashtag #‎PitBullWeek.

Adorable photos of pit bulls

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/07/28/my-pit-bull_n_5625605.html

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Pit bulls have long been popular family pets, noted for their affection and loyalty, but you don’t hear much about gentle, loving pit bulls in the media because a well-behaved dog doesn’t make headlines.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/matt-bershadker/what-puts-pit-bulls-in-pe_b_5626508.html

Pit bull heroes

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/07/29/pit-bulls-heroic-happy-and-good_n_5563496.html

And hopefully, we will have an interview with a very special guest this week, a pit bull named Susie and her mom, Donna. On Sunday August 3, this weekend, a movie about their very amazing life together will be on TV. The movie is called Susie’s Hope.

Stay tuned !!!

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Fighting Over Dogs and Cats

Nowadays, many of us pet parents, consider our fur babies our children. There is nothing wrong with that, in my humble opinion. Except that the law considers them property not kids. Still, issues like divorce bring up similar considerations between spouses, what to do about the fur kids. Who gets to “keep” the fur kids? Will custody be shared? Can one party “keep” the fur baby and how often can the other party visit? Below an attorney, guest blogger, Charla Bradshaw, flushes out the issues more fully.

I don’t wanna get divorced…

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http://www.buzzfeed.com/paws/sad-puppies-that-will-ruin-your-day#

more info:

http://www.womansdivorce.com/pet-custody.html

Consider making up a pre-pup arrangement (like a pre-nup) that spells out what happens to your pets if your marriage splits up.

True Love American Style

  “We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals”

                                -Immanuel Kant

The American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers conducted a poll of 1,500 members and nearly a quarter said they had noticed an increase in custody issues over pets. Courts have had to determine not only who gets the pet but whether one party has the right to see the pet after the marriage breaks up.  Identifying the best interests of the pet in a divorce case can safeguard that the pet is properly cared for after divorce.

Pets can provide unbelievable companionship and unconditional love for adults and children.  Animals such as dogs, cats and horses are considered personal property for divorce purposes and unfortunately can also be the subject of domestic violence.

In a divorce, pets must be awarded as part of the property division and therefore will usually go to one spouse or the other.  However, spouses can choose to co-own the pet going forward and create a visitation schedule for the pet.  We have done these orders and they actually work very well.  We also see pet schedules associated with a child’s visitation schedule where the pet goes with the child.  When spouses co-own a pet, going forward, we must provide provisions for the expenses related to the animal. This can be important when dealing with livestock, such as horses, or an animal that has health issues.

Since pets are considered personal property, there can be disputes over whether the pet is the separate property of one of the spouses or community property.  Separate property can be acquired by a gift, inheritance, or if the property was owned on the date of marriage.  Separate property cannot be divided by a court.  Spouses may argue over whether the pet was a “gift”, or whether the spouses bought the pet together, making the pet community property subject to being awarded to one spouse or the other.

Unfortunately, pets are often targets in family violence but Texas has come to the rescue.  Texas courts can now include pets in protective orders in domestic violence cases. Because pets have suffered abuse when family violence has occurred, in 2011 the Texas legislature amended the law to prohibit the removal of animals from the possession of a person named in the protective order.  In a protective order, the court may prohibit a party from removing a pet, companion animal, or assistance animal, as defined by Section 121.002 of the Human Resources Code, from the possession or actual or constructive care of a person named in the protective order.  The “actual or constructive care” verbiage was added in 2013.  In turn, in 2013, the Texas Penal Code was amended to specify what the possession of a pet, companion animal, or assistance animal by a person actually means.

So what do these protective order laws actually mean for pets?  They mean that a person subject to a protective order that violates a pet provision in the protective order can go to jail, plain and simple.  An abuser will often turn on a pet to cause pain and suffering not only to the pet, but to the perpetrator’s victim(s).  An abuser may also threaten a pet’s life in order to keep their victim(s) close.  As a result, a victim may stay in an abusive situation to keep the companionship of the pet, not realizing the court can make orders with regard to the pet.

One of the problems is that most facilities and shelters for those running from family violence are not equipped to take animals and therefore the animals are left behind. There is a growing need in this regard not only for the safety of the pet but because the unconditional love a pet can give may be lost at the time it is needed the most.

Divorce or abuse can actually take a toll on a pet.  The Humane Society of the United States sets forth the following signs of pet stress:

•    They become depressed

•    They sleep a lot

•    Their appetite lessens

•    They’re not interested in their walks or other daily activities

•    They start to cry or whimper

•    They groom, lick and/or bite themselves excessively

•    They have accidents in the home

The bottom line is that pets are often the subject of divorce and family violence and the laws are improving to protect them.  It is important for everyone to be aware of these laws especially so that abuse victims may realize the court can include a pet in a protective order.  Abuse is bad enough for the lives of those who suffer it, but losing or leaving behind a pet can only make the suffering worse.

Victims asking a court for a protective order should ask the court to make orders regarding their pet(s).  Additionally, spouses in a divorce should be aware that pet(s) are property.  Sadly, a pet may become the subject of a very expensive fight when the real issue is to cause pain to the other spouse.

Charla Bradshaw is an accomplished family law attorney and Denton Managing Shareholder known for successfully summarizing some of the most difficult cases. She was listed among the Top 50 Women Lawyers in Texas (2014) and rated one of the Best Women Lawyers in North Texas by D Magazine. While she employs an aggressive approach to litigating family law cases, Charla Bradshaw is also a certified mediator and handles collaborative law cases.

This is a blog hop post… click on link here

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Filed under adoption, animal abuse, blog hop, cats, dogs, Humane Society, keep pets safe, moms, pet blog hop, pet care, Uncategorized

Happy Take Your Pooch to Work Day

June 20 is Take Your Dog to Work Day…   how are you celebrating?

 

here are some ideas:

 

http://www.takeyourdog.com/Get-Involved/10-ways-to-celebrate.php

 

Some lucky doggies go to work EVERY Day…

 

Screen shot 2014-06-19 at 11.18.54 AM   http://www.dogsforheroes.org/   http://www.pinterest.com/stubbydog/pit-bulls-are-therapy-dogs/   and some lucky humans gets to work with dogs (and other animals) Every day…   here are some of their jobs/businesses:

Advocate for animals

Animal boarding facility

Animal Communicator

Animal control officer

Animal sanctuary (Best Friends, VillaLobos)

Artist, pet portraits

Author of pet books

Cat/canine coffee house owner

Dog trainer

Dog food cook

Dog treat baker

Dog food truck (ie, Phydough)

Dog bakery owner or employee

Doggie daycare owner or employee

Doggie groomer

Dog hydrotherapist, acupuncturist, canine massage therapist

Farmer

Filmmaker of pet movies

Guide dog trainer

Jewelry maker of pet items

Pet camp owner

Pet fashion (clothing designer, sales)

Pet friendly innkeeper

Pet toymaker

Pet food retail shop owner

Pet photographer

Pet Public Relations/Marketing/Social Media

Pet product manufacturer (i.e., collars, leashes, harnesses, food, shampoo)

Pet sitter

Pet transporter/taxi

Pet travel specialist

Pet Travel writer

Pet writer

Property management (pet friendly properties)

Realtor (pet friendly homes)

Train dog models, dog actors

T-shirts, clothing related to pets

Veterinarian

Vet technician

Website designer (for pet related products, group, rescues, etc)

  Do you work with animals?   shampoo-conditioner-3

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Filed under adoption, animal communication, animal rescue, animal stars, animals, dog rescue, dog training, dog wear, doggie camp, doggie daycare, dogs, keep pets safe, pet sitting, pet travel, pit bull, Uncategorized, vet

Iconic LA hotel

Guest blog post by Leslie Nestor Miranda. Cici and I met Leslie and his lovely dog Lilly last year when we went on a press trip to San Luis Obispbo. Leslie is an outstanding photographer of the traveling kind. And he has worked for Wall Street Journal Online, Architectural Digest, Elle Decor Magazine and many others.  (Note: all of the photos below by Leslie Nestor Miranda). 


“I’ve been designed to capture time and moments with a camera.  I foresee the outcome to better understand and appreciate the present.”

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Many moons ago, I (CS), lived right on Normandie (around Normandie and 3rd). The neighborhood has changed a lot but I still remember the sign of this historic hotel. I wanted to live near my job for the City of Los Angeles (downtown) and the apartment I lived in there fit the bill. It was spacious, relatively inexpensive and located within minutes of downtown.

An Icon in Los Angeles

The historic beacon of the Wilshire Center/Koreatown neighborhood, the pet friendly Hotel Normandie, has been in continuous operation since 1926. It now has entered a multi-million dollar restoration period that will bring the 20th century landmark well into the 21st century.

hotel norm sign

General Manager Luke Knowles loves to discuss the history of the hotel.  This brick building has established itself as an icon in Los Angeles. It is located on Normandie and 6th Street and designed and built by famed architects Walker and Eisen, who also designed such architectural treasures as the Beverly Wilshire Hotel in Beverly Hills and the Fine Arts Building in downtown Los Angeles.

The boutique hotel has seen over eight decades of personalities such as English author Malcolm Lowry, one of the hotels most famous residents, who worked on his masterpiece novel “Under the Volcano” while living there in the late 1930’s.

New owner Jingbo Lou, a Pasadena architect and preservationist, and his partner Niall Kelly are restoring the 100-room Renaissance Revival exterior and its Spanish Revival interior, to its rightful glory.

They uncovered a grand fireplace that was covered for years but now  xxx  as you enter the lobby.  The terrazzo floor in the lobby and the hardwood floors in the guest rooms have also been restored.

hotel norm lobby

hotel norm room

While L.A. has the nation’s largest Korean population and Koreans make up the largest nationality in the neighborhood (22%,according to demographic analysis) most of the residents of Koreatown are Latino: 58%. But you can also find Bangladeshi, Brazilian, Vietnamese, Pakistani and South American residents, businesses and eateries in the area.  Koreatown is west of downtown and south of Hollywood and is considered part of the Mid-Wilshire district.

The neighborhood is mostly residential after Wilshire and 6th Street. There are lots of Korean BBQ restaurants, coffee shops on Wilshire, Asian markets on 6th Street and local Korean bars and karaoke.

This pet friendly hotel offers amenities for pets such as doggie beds, treats, and bowls.

Pets are not allowed in the breakfast or lounge area with the exception of certified service animals, there is a $50 non-refundable pet charge per stay (unless you change rooms).   All pets must be kept on a leash at all times when in common or public areas.

In July, the historic Cassell’s Hamburgers featuring Prime Beef burgers will be reopening in the building’s 6th Street corner.

Visit the website at http://www.hotelnormandiela.com  for special discounts and an option to purchase an Advanced Purchase sale.

Pet friendly dining in the area now includes:

Beer Belly: you can relax in front of the craft beer bar with your dog, leash in one hand, nice craft brew in the other. And while your pup probably won’t be too interested in your pint, best keep an eye on those duck fat fries. 532 S. Western Ave., L.A.; (213) 387-2337.

Toe Bang

Chapman Plaza

3465 W 6th St, Ste 110 Los Angeles, CA 90020 Koreatown, Wilshire Center  (213) 387-4905

Wiches On Wilshire

3800 Wilshire Boulevard #110b, Los Angeles, CA 90010.  (213) 389-3656

Seoul Sausage

Winners of The Great Food Truck Race season 3, 

11313 Mississippi Ave. , Los Angeles, CA 90025

http://www.seoulsausage.com/

Haus is a popular Korean Cafe located on 6th and Serrano.  Pros: Free wifi, big food menu, great service, dog friendly.  3826 W 6th St, Los Angeles, CA 90020, (213) 388-5311

Dog parks, there are none in Koreatown

but Beverly Hills does not have one either (they are in the process of having one though)

the city’s very first dog romping zone on a city-owned lot at the southeast corner of Foothill Road and Alden Drive

Some places that have parks and/or dog parks that you probably want to visit anyway include:

Silver Lake Dog Park

323.644.3946 

The recreation center is located on Silver Lake Dr, while the dog park is located on Silver Lake Blvd. near the center and southern tip of the resevoir.

GRIFFITH PARK DOG PARK

Located at north end of the John Ferraro Soccer Field on North Zoo Drive, Los Angeles, CA 90027   Off-leash dog park.

 (323) 913-4688

Page Museum at the La Brea Tar Pits:

5801 Wilshire Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90036
(213) 763-3499

there is a park but not specifically a dog park

a nice place to hang out with your dog on a Saturday morning to have a picnic or maybe just a good romp in the grass, The La Brea Tar Pits are adjacent to the LACMA in Mid-Wilshire and its a big park. You can walk your dog through the park, play fetch or people watch.

Hancock Park

 5801 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90036

 (323) 934-7243

 

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Fleas, fox tails and allergies, oh my

 Happy Holidays!!!

 

Well, this week Cici and I had a scary emergency and yesterday she had to have surgery. She has been itching again and I have not seen any fleas. But apparently there have been some. Maybe they are invisible? Well, she was scratching a lot and rolling on her back a lot, even on the concrete. And then she got all splotchy and blotchy and doing the zoomies in the house and being completely weird and whacko. She was going NUTS. And then, she scratched up the carpet by the front door. She has NEVER done that in all of the time I’ve had her (7 years!) and at 3 a.m. in the morning I discovered her ear had swollen up. It felt like and looked like the leaf of an aloe vera leaf. I Googled it and found out that she had blood in her ear. Then the blood started seeping out of her ear and forehead. I was distraught and upset and well, you know crazed. I called the vet asap and set up an appointment for surgery. (The best way to drain the blood).

And yesterday morning at 8 am, Cici had her ear  drained of blood. And now she is wearing a cone (for a few weeks) and has sutures in her ear. She looks like an alien. Not sure if you can tell that from the photo below. And she has lots of pills to take in hot dogs (so that is not so bad). Am VERY relieved.

I think what happened was that Cici had a fox tail, one in each ear, a LARGE one in the ear that filled up with blood and when she was scratching and shaking her head, the blood vessels burst and developed into a hematoma. (Read more about a hematoma below).

 

Photo on 2014-04-18 at 08.07

Am VERY thankful for my anipals online, Susan S., Dana, Fifi LeBon Bon, and friends who gave me lots of moral support and one anonymous donor who helped foot the BIG vet bill.

I also want to thank Carie Broecker of Peace of Mind Dog Rescue who helped support with volunteers who drove us to and from the vet as well as picked up medicine for Cici. Ironically, Carie’s cat Betty Boop just had similar surgery as Cici’s, although for a different reason.

http://www.peaceofminddogrescue.org/index.php

photo

 

ALSO, I must mention, and hope that you would like to join me in seeing how we can set up an emergency pet health care system for low income families so that NO animal can be turned away from the medical vet care that they need because of lack of funds of the owner. It was an extremely situation for me as it was but then when the vet tells you that you have to come up with a large amount of cash ASAP, the crisis escalates. Some folks give up their pets to a shelter at that point. Or they post fundraising pleas for donations. All in all it is a VERY humiliating and difficult situation that WE NEED TO CHANGE.  Most of us do not have extra cash, especially when living on a fixed income. If anyone wants to donate for Cici’s vet bill, please paypal us at prmatchmaker at yahoo.com.

 

 

Hematoma

A hematoma is an accumulation of blood under the skin. In the case of the ear this occurs as a result of damage to the ear flap in the pet that shakes its head excessively or scratches at the ear. Those pets with “floppy ears” are more prone to this condition although erect ear dogs and cats are occasionally affected.

The excessive shaking / scratching by the pet is often due to ear canal irritation. This may be due to ear infection (germs or foxtails), ear mites (small bugs that live in the ear canal), allergies (causing “itchy ears”), or fleas (that travel into the ear canal). The self-trauma ruptures the blood vessel inside of the ear flap, causing the blood clot.  This hematoma separates the cartilage from the skin of the ear flap and causes the painful swelling.

If the hematoma is not drained the ear will remain painful for a period of time and then start to scar down on its own. This scarring creates a visible deformity of the ear that is permanent and may lead to future ear complications.

There are numerous treatment approaches that can be used:

  1. Aspiration of the hematoma (with a needle & syringe) and bandage of the ear flap for 3-4 weeks. This treatment is the least expensive but also fails 75% of the time. It is considered an “economic alternative” when other methods of repair are not possible.
  2. Drainage of the blood clot with a local anesthetic and placement of a special plastic drain tube into the ear flap is another method of treatment. A bandage is also used for many weeks (even after the tube is removed). This treatment has a higher success rate than simple aspiration (approx. 50%), is somewhat more expensive, but is also considered an “economic alternative” to recommended treatment.
  3. Surgical drainage of the hematoma and applying stitches in the ear (utilizing a special foam ear pad) is the recommended treatment for this problem. The sutures actually serve to reattached the skin of the ear back to the cartilage. This allows for better, faster healing and often eliminates the need for a bandage. The success rate is greater than 98% with this treatment method. Two follow-up visits are required over a 3-week period.

Once the pet has had the hematoma corrected surgically it is rare to see a recurrence in the same ear although without thorough treatment of the underlying problem it could occur with the opposite ear flap.

HOME THERAPY MAY CONSIST OF:

  1. Administration of oral medication or antibiotics
  2. Using medicated ear drops
  3. A special plastic collar to prevent further scratching of the ear flap during healing.

 

Beware of fox tails

http://pets.webmd.com/dogs/foxtail-grass-and-your-dog

So the moral of this story is KEEP YOUR DOGS and CATS safe and out of the foxtails. Make sure that the fleas stay far away. And if your dog gets allergies in the spring, give them what they need to stop the itching.

 

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