Category Archives: allergies

Fleas, fox tails and allergies, oh my

 Happy Holidays!!!

 

Well, this week Cici and I had a scary emergency and yesterday she had to have surgery. She has been itching again and I have not seen any fleas. But apparently there have been some. Maybe they are invisible? Well, she was scratching a lot and rolling on her back a lot, even on the concrete. And then she got all splotchy and blotchy and doing the zoomies in the house and being completely weird and whacko. She was going NUTS. And then, she scratched up the carpet by the front door. She has NEVER done that in all of the time I’ve had her (7 years!) and at 3 a.m. in the morning I discovered her ear had swollen up. It felt like and looked like the leaf of an aloe vera leaf. I Googled it and found out that she had blood in her ear. Then the blood started seeping out of her ear and forehead. I was distraught and upset and well, you know crazed. I called the vet asap and set up an appointment for surgery. (The best way to drain the blood).

And yesterday morning at 8 am, Cici had her ear  drained of blood. And now she is wearing a cone (for a few weeks) and has sutures in her ear. She looks like an alien. Not sure if you can tell that from the photo below. And she has lots of pills to take in hot dogs (so that is not so bad). Am VERY relieved.

I think what happened was that Cici had a fox tail, one in each ear, a LARGE one in the ear that filled up with blood and when she was scratching and shaking her head, the blood vessels burst and developed into a hematoma. (Read more about a hematoma below).

 

Photo on 2014-04-18 at 08.07

Am VERY thankful for my anipals online, Susan S., Dana, Fifi LeBon Bon, and friends who gave me lots of moral support and one anonymous donor who helped foot the BIG vet bill.

I also want to thank Carie Broecker of Peace of Mind Dog Rescue who helped support with volunteers who drove us to and from the vet as well as picked up medicine for Cici. Ironically, Carie’s cat Betty Boop just had similar surgery as Cici’s, although for a different reason.

http://www.peaceofminddogrescue.org/index.php

photo

 

ALSO, I must mention, and hope that you would like to join me in seeing how we can set up an emergency pet health care system for low income families so that NO animal can be turned away from the medical vet care that they need because of lack of funds of the owner. It was an extremely situation for me as it was but then when the vet tells you that you have to come up with a large amount of cash ASAP, the crisis escalates. Some folks give up their pets to a shelter at that point. Or they post fundraising pleas for donations. All in all it is a VERY humiliating and difficult situation that WE NEED TO CHANGE.  Most of us do not have extra cash, especially when living on a fixed income. If anyone wants to donate for Cici’s vet bill, please paypal us at prmatchmaker at yahoo.com.

 

 

Hematoma

A hematoma is an accumulation of blood under the skin. In the case of the ear this occurs as a result of damage to the ear flap in the pet that shakes its head excessively or scratches at the ear. Those pets with “floppy ears” are more prone to this condition although erect ear dogs and cats are occasionally affected.

The excessive shaking / scratching by the pet is often due to ear canal irritation. This may be due to ear infection (germs or foxtails), ear mites (small bugs that live in the ear canal), allergies (causing “itchy ears”), or fleas (that travel into the ear canal). The self-trauma ruptures the blood vessel inside of the ear flap, causing the blood clot.  This hematoma separates the cartilage from the skin of the ear flap and causes the painful swelling.

If the hematoma is not drained the ear will remain painful for a period of time and then start to scar down on its own. This scarring creates a visible deformity of the ear that is permanent and may lead to future ear complications.

There are numerous treatment approaches that can be used:

  1. Aspiration of the hematoma (with a needle & syringe) and bandage of the ear flap for 3-4 weeks. This treatment is the least expensive but also fails 75% of the time. It is considered an “economic alternative” when other methods of repair are not possible.
  2. Drainage of the blood clot with a local anesthetic and placement of a special plastic drain tube into the ear flap is another method of treatment. A bandage is also used for many weeks (even after the tube is removed). This treatment has a higher success rate than simple aspiration (approx. 50%), is somewhat more expensive, but is also considered an “economic alternative” to recommended treatment.
  3. Surgical drainage of the hematoma and applying stitches in the ear (utilizing a special foam ear pad) is the recommended treatment for this problem. The sutures actually serve to reattached the skin of the ear back to the cartilage. This allows for better, faster healing and often eliminates the need for a bandage. The success rate is greater than 98% with this treatment method. Two follow-up visits are required over a 3-week period.

Once the pet has had the hematoma corrected surgically it is rare to see a recurrence in the same ear although without thorough treatment of the underlying problem it could occur with the opposite ear flap.

HOME THERAPY MAY CONSIST OF:

  1. Administration of oral medication or antibiotics
  2. Using medicated ear drops
  3. A special plastic collar to prevent further scratching of the ear flap during healing.

 

Beware of fox tails

http://pets.webmd.com/dogs/foxtail-grass-and-your-dog

So the moral of this story is KEEP YOUR DOGS and CATS safe and out of the foxtails. Make sure that the fleas stay far away. And if your dog gets allergies in the spring, give them what they need to stop the itching.

 

5 Comments

Filed under adoption, allergies, animal rescue, cats, dog cone collar, dog crazy, dog health, dog rescue, dog with cone, dogs, ear infection, holistic healing for animals, holistic vet, itchy red ears, keep pets safe, paypal, pet care, Uncategorized

Pupdate 22

Had to take Cici to the vet AGAIN because her rear end was all red and swollen near her tail. Turned out that she needed to have her anal glands expressed (which I suspected)… and it turned out that she also lost 2 pounds (last time she gained 6 pounds, so this time she lost 2, she only gained 4 pounds then of the 14 she has lost in total)… have to pig this girl out, any suggestions???  vet said I just feed her even more food, am already giving her three meals a day plus treats. It is making me somewhat nutty that she is still so skin and boney.

The vet admitted that Cici’s skin is better even though she is still somewhat itchy. However, I did NOT enlighten her that I stopped the antibiotics. She wanted me to give her steroids but I have opted out of that too.

I called our local health food for dogs store (yes there is one in Carmel) and asked what they would suggest (sometimes the MOST obvious things you do not think to do until you do think of it)… this was after I ordered some special doggie shampoo from Amazon that turned out to be NOT so natural and made me ill… smelled like a combo of hair spray and those plug-in fragrances, two odors that are not not not all natural and get me sick.  I washed Cici with the shampoo and now she smells like that, ugh. But the company said they give 100% refund so I called Amazon and asked what their policy is and thankfully they said they would take it back, too. Refunded my card and sent me a link to print out a shipping label, too so I do not even have to pay the shipping charges. Gotta love Amazon for that !!!

Moving on in this saga, so I called the raw food doggie store, The Raw Connection, in Carmel and asked for their suggestion of an all natural doggie shampoo that would stop the itchies. And they told me about Miracle II Soap and Neutralizer (Liquid and Gel). She said it worked really well for her white poodle. I decided to give it a try. They had it on Amazon but I did not want to wait so we toodled on down to Carmel after the vet and got the moisturizing shampoo and gel.

 

miracle-2-products_s Screen shot 2013-09-26 at 9.56.48 AM

This stuff is lauded to be good for just about EVERYTHING (I googled it)… so far have not given Cici another bath because TWO baths in ONE week would surely make her leave me. But I have used the gel on her icky areas (where she chews on herself until red, raw and bleeding) and voila, works!!!  also have rubbed the gel onto my osteoarthritis knees and seems to eliminate the pain, so am a happy camper.

Not cheap and there is the gel (which I bought) and the neutralizer liquid which I still plan to buy. The liquid can be taken internally for various reasons.

Fleas and Ticks:
Shampoo dog and cat with Miracle Soap – rinse. Then spray Neutralizer and let dry.  It will not hurt their eyes. Heals rashes, and cuts on dogs, cats and horses. Animal lovers, you will love it!

miracle-2-products_s

1 Comment

Filed under allergies, bathing your dog, Carmel, dog friendly, doggie healing center, dogs, eco friendly/green, four paws up, K9 approved, keep pets safe, natural health remedies, pet care

Dogs just wanna eat

Today we have an interview with Kate Solisti, who has graced us with wonderful info about dog diets and nutrition and has written numerous books about Pet Communication… welcome…

 

 

dsc03280w

tell us a little bit about yourself including how many dogs you have or have had and other pets, experience with pets, and so on… 

I have been an animal communicator since 1992. Over the years I’ve written 4 books and edited an anthology, “Kinship with Animals.” My books have been published in 7 languages and focus on interspecies communication, teachings from the animals, dog & cat nutrition, flower essence support and more, addressing the whole companion animal — body, mind and spirit.

My beloved dog Mollie, a sheltie cross, is in spirit and I currently have three wonderful feline companions, Azul, Simon and Lily.

is there any specific diet that you recommend for pet parents that is the best for dogs optimum health or does the diet depend upon different factors?  (age, size, weight, breed)?

I believe in meeting guardians where they are in terms of time, budget and level of commitment to their animal’s health. There is no “one perfect” diet for all animals. Breed, age, activity level, stress level, individual food sensitivities etc. are all critical pieces to take into consideration when counseling a guardian in nutrition and meal planning for their companions. Of course, the fresher, more “whole foods”  in the diet, the better. Highly processed, inexpensive dry food is not nutritious and will not support a dog or cat in living a long, healthy life.

guidelines for nutrition? 

Again, the freshest foods are the best. Many animals thrive on a raw diet, but some, especially older animals, need their fresh foods lightly cooked. The next best, is high quality canned foods and a little dry with eggs, real meat and healthy “table scraps” added in proper proportions’. A diet of all canned or all dry is not ideal. Dry food is not okay by itself. Do not be fooled by advertising or pretty packaging. You need to READ the ingredients to be sure they are real meats and vegetables. Avoid any type of gluten, soy, corn, sugars, like maltodextrin and corn syrup and all by- products, colorings and additives like BHA and BH (known carcinogens). Remember, if you wouldn’t eat it, why would you feed it to your dog?

are there supplements that you recommend for dogs?

Two of my favorite stand-bys are digestive enzymes and probiotics. I can safely say that all animals eating dry or canned foods exclusively need these to help break down the food and absorb nutrients. Most animals, especially elderly and rescued animals, really benefit from these two supplements. Animals eating raw foods get live enzymes from their fresh food. Enzymes are destroyed in the cooking process. Any dog who has been on antibiotics and medications needs probiotics to help rebuild good, healthy gut bacteria that is essential for absorption of nutrients and a healthy immune system. Some dogs need to be on these all the time, others during times of stress.

are there factors to consider in regard to feeding your pet?

Yes, each animal must be understood as an individual and fed according to their needs.

do you find that most pet parents feed their dogs/pets kibble and canned foods or does it vary?

Yes, most do simply because they and their veterinarians are uninformed about what dogs & cats need to eat to stay healthy. I often learn that prescription diets are fed for too long and never reevaluated. As I said above, dry food is not okay by itself. Would you want to eat dry cereal every day? Would that be good for you? Well it isn’t for most dogs either.

do most dogs love peanut butter, bacon, cheese? 

It seems so. I believe that they are attracted to the fat and salt in these foods.

what is the weirdest food a dog you have spoken to liked? 

Oh my. There have been too many to list. Dogs are part of Nature’s cleanup crew, so they will try almost anything!

are dogs carnivores?

Yes, dogs are carnivores. All you have to do is look at their teeth to see this. They are almost omnivores, but again, their teeth put them plainly in the carnivore crew.

does that mean a raw diet of meat is best ?

a raw BALANCED diet with muscle, organ, connective tissue, blood, and VERY importantly bone is best for SOME dogs. The key to a balanced raw diet is to “build a bird or mammal.” Many people think mixing up a batch of ground meat, chopped veggies and a little cottage cheese is fine, but it is not balanced.  A raw or cooked homemade diet MUST be balanced correctly or it will cause dangerous deficiencies in the dog or cat. There are a few excellent supplements that can be added to a homemade diet if you can’t grind up bone and know you have the right amounts of proper vitamins and minerals.

should dogs eat grains or a grain-free diet?

Again, this depends on the dog.

is a grain free diet healthy for dogs?

For most dogs, grain-free is best. But others do better with some cooked grains in their diet. I usually prefer quinoa over most other grains. Rice is beneficial when there are digestive issues, but not necessary once the digestive tract returns to normal.

is there a flea free diet? itch free diet?  a diet that repels fleas, ticks and other bugs? 

I am not aware of a “diet” per se, but adding a small amount of garlic and nutritional yeast is often a very helpful flea and tick deterrent. As for itching, there are many causes of that. One simple thing to give to see if it helps is the right essential fatty acids. This would be fats from meats, fish (salmon, trout, sardines) or fish oils or other marine lipid oils. Some dogs do well with coconut oil. Be careful. Many fish oils, especially the generic and inexpensive ones, can be rancid and unhealthy for your companion. I have done a lot of research on the subject and recommend a specific, sustainably grown and harvested marine lipid supplement. It is the cleanest source I know of and has more anti-inflammatory properties than fish oil.

what do you feed your dogs?

If I had a dog, she would most likely eat a raw diet with lots of variety just as my cats do.

this is senior dog month, what age is a dog considered senior?

In my opinion, senior is as senior does! I read someone’s blog the other day and his dog is 11 years old and he considers his dog a senior Some say that my dog, just turned 7, is becoming a senior… does age depend upon breed? diet?  Well gosh, 11 is 77 in dog years and 7 is only 49! Yes, condition is key for me in determining a dog’s “senior status.” I have watched dogs with all the symptoms of old age, literally age backwards with a correct diet and the right supplements — specific supplements that I have come to focus on due to their exceptional benefits in a short time.

is there a consensus from dogs on any of the above? what do the dogs have to say about dog food?

Of course we all know “picky” dogs, but most dogs LOVE food, most foods. I will say though that the biggest “consensus” is around nourishing food. Dogs want and need to be nourished first and foremost. Without proper nourishment, they cannot accomplish their missions with their people and lead fulfilling lives. (Just like us.)

anything else that you would like to share?

 

Thank you CeliaSue for your good questions and devotion to helping people learn about good nutrition for their dogs. I am available for private phone consultations on diet planning, health and behavior. Please visit my website, www.akinshipwithanimals.com for all the details. Looking forward to hearing from you all and helping you create the ideal diet for your dogs (and cats too.)

 

http://akinshipwithanimals.com/?action=healing

 

Leave a comment

Filed under allergies, animal books, animal communication, animal rescue, animals, au natural dog, cats, dog health, dog treats, dogs, guest blog, healthy dog food, interviews, keep pets safe, pet care, pet food, Uncategorized

eat spray lick

took Cici to the vet this week. she has lost 12-14 pounds… she had fleas (do not see anymore, thankfully), she may have worms, and she has a terrible skin infection. Without her cone on her head, I have to be REALLY vigilant, or she will make a bloody mess of her rear end in under two minutes.

Questions I have not yet asked the vet (we go back for a follow-up in two weeks)… did the fleas drink 12-14 pounds of her blood or did the worms eat up all of her food (because I was feeding her twice as much as normal and she kept dropping weight)… is she EVER going to stop scratching, itching and chewing on herself????

Lessons learned again:  even when you want to do the best thing, all natural remedies and treatments need to be advised by and / or treated by a knowledgeable pet expert / holistic vet.  I learned that Cici cannot tolerate essential oils (she gets rashes) and some recommended home remedies do NOT work to relieve itching or fleas. I found out that grains and coconut oil, for instance, sweetens the blood and attracts fleas. I stopped giving it to her immediately.  gave her a nice grass fed beef broth made with parsley, a clove of garlic and water, for two days…

the vet techs gave her a medicated bath and I gave her one too at their instructions and she is still itchy…  she was given confortis for the fleas, a de-wormer pill, and is on antibiotics twice a day (hidden in hot dogs)… she is eating a grain free diet for the next couple of weeks (rabbit, turkey burgers, and meat meat meat), not prescribed by the vet… but hoping to hulk her up.

also hope to strengthen her immune system so that she can get her weight back.  have found a way to give Cici ASEA every day, add some raw meat or butter to it and she licks it right up… since I have been giving this to her, she does not seem as scrawny, bones do not seem to be protruding as much. I spray it on her itchy spots and when she chews on herself to alleviate the itch and the spray works really well…

ASEA helps cells work more efficiently and empowers the body to repair itself. It also increases cellular efficiency and intercellular communications… amazing molecules

I also hope to be able to get these products for Cici that were recommended by Pet communication expert Kate Solisti…

the company that offers these products is earthanimals.com 

HERBAL INTERNAL POWDER (Yeast Free): Formulated by Dr. Bob Goldstein

Ingredients: Alfalfa Powder, Garlic Powder, Blue-Green Algae (Spirulina), Kelp Powder, Papaya Leaf, Nettles Leaf, Hawthorne Berry Powder.

Herbal Internal Powder is a culmination of organic herbs for flea and tick prevention, it is “yeast free” for dogs and cats that can be sensitive to yeast. It contains, the highest quality ingredients rich in minerals that will help cleanse and purify the blood, support circulation, help deter fleas, ticks,  mosquitoes and black flies. Taken regularly, the Herbal Internal Powder makes your animal less attractive to infestation.

By simply adding the powder to your animals daily diet, the combination of the minerals and herbs, helps to change the odor of the dog and cats blood chemistry, so that fleas, ticks, mosquitoes, and black flies do not like the odor or taste of the blood. The odor is undetectable by humans and is loathed by bugs, therefore they do not like to imbed or go on the animal at all! At the same time, building their immune system. We believe the healthier the animal the less likely for any infestations. It works! Over 20 years of proven testimonials!

No More Flea Drops

An organic, herbal remedy designed to help alter the chemistry of your dog or cats blood scent, so the scent of the body is loathed by fleas. It helps assist the dog or cat in his/her defense against flea infestations and flea bite dermatitis.  We suggest adding the drops over and above The Herbal Internal Powder or Internal Powder.  The drops, in liquid form have a high absorption benefit and will enhance the powder for ultimate prevention from fleas.

Ingredients: Garlic, Wormwood, Yellow Dock, Alfalfa, Nettles, and Kelp.

has your dog ever lost weight? had a bad skin infection?  had worms?   what did you do to fatten them up again?  stop them from itching?

have you ever tried sleeping with a conehead?  either the cone winds up on my legs or on my head…

Find the coneless dog head…

Photo on 2013-08-16 at 10.28

oh there it is, with dog bed ear (humans get bed head, apparently dogs get bed ears)…

Photo on 2013-08-16 at 10.56 #2

contemplating her bath today / wondering who to call to get her out of it…

Photo on 2013-08-16 at 11.02

alas, she had her bath and is now conehead once again…

Photo on 2013-08-02 at 08.53

Blog Hop time…thanks to Life with DogsTwo Little Cavaliers and Confessions of the Plume…  grab the blog hop  link

1 Comment

Filed under allergies, bathing your dog, blog hop, bugs, dog health, dog with cone, dogs, healthy dog food, holistic healing for animals, itchy red ears, keep pets safe, organic, pet blog hop, pet care, pet food, vet

Conehead

well, now we are working with raw apple cider vinegar diluted with water and sprayed onto her as well as giving her some every day with her food and the coconut oil… both of these work really well and do not get her splotchy blotchy and rashy like any of the essential oils have…

Cici has good days and bad… when I slather her up with Dr. Harvey’s healing cream and/or coconut oil, she does better and then she starts chewing and scratching again. I have a cone on her but she can get it off.

Photo on 2013-08-02 at 08.53

This has been a real challenge.  The apple cider vinegar helps with the itchies and the bugs (repelling them) so I think the combination of stuff works…  when she sees me coming with the spray bottle she has been running into the closet to hide, poor sweetie.   She barks at me with the cone because she thinks that she cannot do anything when it is on her head.  Any tricks that you have used that work on your dog when you have to spray stuff on them and/or make them wear a cone?  How do you overcome the itchies???

Apple Cider Vinegar (raw) 

Start with a one-teaspoon dose mixed into your dog’s food twice a day for a 50 lb dog (adjust accordingly by weight) and if necessary increase up to about 1 tablespoon twice a day for the same size dog. For skin application, you can spray on or rub apple cider in directly, or for sore or open wounds mix the ACV with equal parts water before application to the dog’s skin. In the case of pests or parasites, bathe your dog and then apply a 50:50 mix of apple cider vinegar and water. Allow this to air dry on your pet to kill off fleas, ticks, ringworm, etc. and to prevent future infestations and/or infection. You can also spray your dog with apple cider vinegar before going out for a walk, in order to repel fleas and ticks naturally.

Apple cider vinegar has excellent antibacterial and antifungal properties that give the immune system a good boost, arming your dog with the strength to ward off pests like fleas and ticks and also diseases like parvo virus in dogs and parvo in puppies.

ACV will calm the redness and swelling while providing your dog with some much needed relief.  ACV can be poured directly on your dog’s fur after a bath and then rinsed, which will cure dandruff, rejuvenate hair and help balance the PH levels in the body.

Apple cider vinegar has also been found to be helpful in the treatment of the following: allergies, osteoporosis, cancer, candida, high cholesterol, constipation, muscle cramps, diarrhea, depression, ear discharge, eczema, fatigue, bladder problems, metabolism and stiff joints.

We may also do this…

A mixture of hydrogen peroxide and borax is one of the best remedies used for mange. However, be sure to not confuse borax with boric acid. Use one to two tablespoons of borax for every 500 cc of 1% hydrogen peroxide, making sure that it thoroughly dissolves. Bathe the dog in it once a week. Do not rinse off and do not wipe the dog dry. Let the solution dry naturally so that it can be absorbed by the skin. Please note that this treatment should not be used longer than a two month period.

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/029853_canine_mange.html#ixzz2b91cL3Ba

You can get 20 Mule Team Borax (pure borax)  at Target

1 Comment

Filed under allergies, dog cone collar, dog friendly, dog health, dog with cone, dogs, keep pets safe, natural cures for ringworm, natural health remedies, organic, pet care

Top dog award

Ok, we are back…

yesterday was Cici’s birthday, she is SEVEN years old…

and my naked little conehead is still scratching (hence the cone)…

Photo on 2013-08-02 at 08.47 #2

and we won an award

TopDog_Final

http://www.canineinc.com/pages/top-95-dog-websites-award

2 Comments

Filed under all you need is a dog, allergies, awards, dogs

Put the dog in the coconut

Ok, well, I always wanted to be a sleuth… Reading Nancy Drew books when I was a pre-teenager, I imagined what it would be like to solve mysteries. Fast forward to yesterday. I had a chance to figure out (once again) what is going on with Cici’s sensitive skin (why it keeps getting rashy and blotchy and itchy).  First, I realized after slathering her up with cream that she did indeed have fleas. Saw several critters fleeing as I slathered. Been trying different natural remedies for the fleas and the rashes and it seemed last week that the coconut oil plus spraying the bedding with a mixture of water and Oregano oil was working. Cici LOVES the coconut oil, laps it up as well as licks it off her fur but the rashes and itchiness was going away.  It is organic virgin Coconut Oil from Trader Joe’s. Am going to get a few more jars.  They’re about $7 for a jar (16 fl. oz).

51%2BqWputVeL

Coconut oil has other benefits … skin smells good. weight loss, if that is an issue, keeping your dog slim and trim. Keeps the yeast away. Helps with arthritis / joints.

“the lauric acid in coconut oil has antibacterial, antiviral, and anti-fungal properties. Capric and caprylic acid have similar properties and are best known for their anti-fungal effects.”

http://www.dogsnaturallymagazine.com/the-health-benefits-of-coconut-oil/

90100692

http://www.petside.com/article/coconut-oil-miracle-jar-dogs

Until yesterday it seemed to be working. And it was strange because she had slept with me (as she did last night too) and I took her for a walk and fed her, gave her a few treats and she seemed just fine and dandy. Then I had brought her back to the bedroom for her after breakfast nap and noticed that she was all blotchy and rashy again. What possibly could have happened? I kept going over the events and decided to look up the ingredients of the treats. Voila.  I also found out that I gave her too many of them. (Am not a big follower of instructions but sometimes it is important to do so). It was suggested to give only 1 or 2 a day and I had given her five or six or seven. Oops.  Not only that but one of the ingredients was rosemary.

A few weeks ago when this all had started up again I had sprayed her with an all natural flea spray that ALSO had rosemary as one of the ingredients.  I think I also oversprayed her too. She did NOT have a problem, I don’t think, with the Salmon oil that had rosemary in it but maybe that is not true. All I know is that there is a common denominator here and it seems to be the MISSING LINK.

So there you have it folks.  No more Rosemary for Cici. It is good to be cautious when it comes to herbs, essential oils, and other natural remedies as well as regular treatments. Some may be too strong for you and/or your poochie pals. Tea tree oil, clove, oregano, cinnamon bark, are some oils that can burn when put on the skin (and more). They have beneficial properties but proceed with caution, dilute, dilute, dilute and for some, do not use at all.  Ask your vet (holistic vet). Tis better to be safe than sorry… don’t let the flea bugs bite !!!!

Photo on 2013-06-04 at 08.37

Lickiest tongue in the west

 

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=10151540622537545

 

 

Put the dog in the Coconut…

Leave a comment

Filed under Adventure, allergies, bathing your dog, belly rubs, bugs, dog health, dogs, holistic healing for animals, holistic vet, itchy red ears, keep pets safe, natural health remedies, organic, pet care, Uncategorized

Beware: side effects of rabies shots

Damn, the police sent me a notice that cici’s dog license had expired and needed to be renewed. Along with that, she needed another rabies shot. I did NOT want to get her vaccinated again but did not know what to do. If I ignored the police, would they come to the door and take my dog away? Especially her breed, the whole thing made me nervous and upset and I wanted to run away. Instead, I went ahead, against my better judgement and had the damn thing done.

Found out that the Monterey SPCA has a low cost vet clinic. We went, Cici loves going to the vet, she got a three year shot, 1-2-3 we got her dog license renewed for three years (last year we did not know about the 3 year shot) and voila, it was done…

well, not quite. Now this week, the itchiness that she was already having has gotten much much much worse. She is beyond itchy… scratching, chewing on herself until she bled (in one spot on her rear)…

Amped up giving her the doggy goo, gave her a bath, slathered dr Harvey’s healing cream onto her rear, and poured aloe vera and hot spot oil onto her. Even got her a soft cone to keep her from chewing and scratching.  She is still chewing and scratching MUCH more than before the shot and she is blotchy, with lots of spots all over her fur.  Below, here she is calling Dr Harvey for help…

Photo on 2013-05-15 at 17.39

Also, the soft cone is too small to keep her from doing it… now started thinking about getting her some dog panties… these are cute… what a royal pain though to put them on and off…

Screen shot 2013-05-17 at 4.54.55 AM

Screen shot 2013-05-17 at 4.56.27 AM

and meanwhile, it occurred to me that perhaps her enhanced/increased itchiness had to do with the stupid rabies shot… sure enough, it DOES..

talked to Dr. Harvey about it and he asked why did I do that?  I did not know what else to do.

Dr. Harvey said that Cici getting rabies is about as likely as a big bear coming to dinner… (in other words, no need for a rabies shot because the shots do not prevent rabies anyway)… sheeeeesh…

well, I have three years now… but meanwhile, here are some tips for YOU dear readers… beware vaccination side effects for your dogs. Some are LIFE THREATENING others are a royal pain in the butt…

http://www.dogsnaturallymagazine.com/itchy-skin-wins-big-a-mystery-to-vets/

Animal Control sends a notice stating that your dog’s rabies vaccination is due. Some of us will vaccinate readily. Because it’s legally mandated, it must be safe, right? Besides, what choice do we have?

Others of us panic, desperate to avoid the shot at any cost. We remember what happened the last time our dog had a rabies vaccination. We wonder, will our dog survive another?

World-renowned pet vaccination scientist, Dr. Jean Dodds, wrote recently: “Rabies vaccines are the most common group of biological products identified in adverse event reports received by the USDA’s Center for Veterinary Biologics (CVB).”

An adverse reaction to a rabies vaccine may exact a high price – to your dog’s health and your wallet. Here’s what you need to know to make vaccinating your dog safer:

1. Learn to recognize adverse reactions. Short-term reactions include vomiting, facial swelling, fever, lethargy, circulatory shock, loss of consciousness and even death. (If your pet appears distressed, contact your vet immediately.) Reactions occurring days or months after vaccination can be difficult to recognize. They include:

• Fibrocarcinomas (cancer) at the injection site
• Seizures and epilepsy
• Autoimmune disease
• Chronic digestive problems
• Allergies
• Skin diseases
• Muscle weakness or atrophy
• Pica (eating inappropriate materials, including feces)
• Behavioral changes (aggression, separation anxiety, compulsive behaviors and more)

If you suspect a health or behavior problem may be connected to a vaccine, you may have to convince your vet. It’s common to hear “it couldn’t be the shot” or “a reaction like that is impossible.” Even the drug’s manufacturer (to whom you should immediately report the reaction — giving them the brand and lot# — may deny the connection. Insist on seeing the product’s package insert,  viewable on-line or from your vet. Also know that long-term reactions aren’t usually documented or even studied. Note: a vaccine reaction, especially one supported by your vet, may entitle you to compensation for medical expenses from the drug manufacturer.

2. Vaccinate healthy dogs only. Vaccinating an unhealthy animal can exacerbate illness and do irreparable harm. Also, immunity may not develop after vaccination because of the dog’s compromised immune system. This is especially dangerous as you may presume immunity that does not exist. Pets with autoimmune disease or cancer are obviously “not healthy,” but neither are pets suffering from stress from a move or surgery, a virus or infection, or allergies or skin problems or any other condition compromising health. (Never allow your pet to be vaccinated during surgery.)

3. Ask for a rabies vaccination exemption.  If your dog has documented health problems, ask your vet to apply for a rabies vaccination extension or exemption. Many localities permit them even if state law doesn’t specifically allow them. If your vet won’t apply for an exemption, go elsewhere. You may want to contact a holistic vet who may better understand the dangers of vaccinating an unhealthy animal. If local law forbids exemptions, change the law. Numerous states are in the process of adding exemptions to their laws. Click this link to check your state’s rabies law and pending exemptions.

4. Don’t vaccinate against rabies within three weeks of other vaccinations or medication for parasites. Multiple vaccines given at once greatly increase the chance of reactions.  Multiple vaccines are especially risky for small dogs.

5. Make sure your dog gets the correct vaccine. If you’re vaccinating a puppy, make sure your vet administers a one-year vaccine initially (as late as legally possible) and a three-year vaccine (or whatever is required in your area) thereafter. The one-year and three-year vaccines are virtually identical medically – but not under the law.  A one-year shot must be followed by re-vaccination a year later. Note: the one-year shot is not safer than the three-year (except that it may contain fewer adjuvants).

6. Vaccinate at the safest time. Vaccinate in the morning, early in the week, and don’t leave the area for at least an hour if possible. Watch for reactions for at least the next 48 hours. Reactions occurring when the closest vet’s office is closed can prove disastrous, even fatal.

7. Tell your vet you want a Thimerosol-free vaccine. Thimerosol (mercury) in vaccines has been linked to adverse reactions. Merial, for one, makes one- and three-year thimersol-free rabies vaccines: IMRAB® 1 TF and IMRAB® 3 TF. Make sure you see “TF” on the label. (If your vet doesn’t carry the vaccine, you may have to vet shop to find the vaccine you want.  You might also ask why the vet why he/she doesn’t carry it.)

8. Find a vet trained in homeopathy to vaccinate your dog.  Certain homeopathic remedies given before, during and after vaccinating can lessen the chance of ill effects from vaccination. Click the link to find vet referral lists.

9. Report all vaccine reactions to your vet and make sure they’re recorded in your pet’s file. Have the vet sign relevant pages, get copies and put them in a safe place. (Vets lose records, retire and move away.) Also report the reaction to the drug’s manufacturer. (You’ll need the vaccine lot number.) Vets are notoriously bad at reporting reactions, but exemptions to rabies vaccination and drug safety require documentation.

10. Don’t vaccinate within a week of travel. Pets experiencing reactions on route can die for lack of immediate medical assistance.  (Find a list of emergency clinics by area athttp://www.vetsnearyou.com/ml2/?v=352875029&u=0880F1AAC5EF9BA40210818080F807184B&gclid=CKOmmcXvm6QCFQY-bAodawLaEg  (I cannot guarantee the clinics’ expertise, but at least this is a place to start.)

11. Keep copies of vaccination records and titer tests in your car(s) and license tags on your dog’s collar or harness. Otherwise, you may be forced to re-vaccinate if your pet bites someone, runs away and is taken to a shelter or if you have to board your pet unexpectedly.

12. Do not administer a rabies vaccine yourself. It will not satisfy legal requirements and you’ll have to have a vet vaccinate again. You will also be unprepared to deal with a potentially life-threatening reaction.  Similarly, a vet’s office may likely be a safer place to get the vaccine than a mobile clinic.

13. Support the Rabies Challenge Fund.  World-renowned scientists, W. Jean Dodds, DVM, and Ronald D. Schultz, PhD, are working as volunteers to increase the interval between rabies boosters by proving that the vaccine gives immunity, first, for five years, and then for seven years. (The study is in year four now.) They’re also working to establish a blood “titer standard” to provide a scientific basis to avoid unnecessary boosters with a simple blood test. This nonprofit group is supported solely by dog lovers and dog groups.

Before the next notice from Animal Control arrives, do your homework. A little time spent learning about the rabies vaccine can mean the difference between your dog’s wellness and serious illness.

Note: a veterinarian/author who specializes in over-vaccination issues read this article and wanted to add a few points.  Click here to learn what this veterinarian says about preventing vaccine reactions.

http://www.dogs4dogs.com/blog/2010/09/23/rabies-vaccination-12-ways-to-vaccinate-more-safely/

http://www.dogs4dogs.com/truth4dogs.html

Suggests doing a detox before and after the vaccination… to prevent and/or reduce symptoms

http://www.parvobuster.org/vaccine-information/rabies-vaccine-side-effects-prevention#!/exjun_

am giving Cici Asea, which helps people and canines and others on a cellular level… these stabilized redox signaling molecules help the cells communicate with one another. As we age, our cells become toxic and we develop diseases. Asea helps to restore the body’s ability to heal itself and each body is different. It is known as a time machine in a bottle… truly revolutionary, I have been taking it for more than three months now… I have more energy, less pain in my knees/legs, and I’ve seen that cuts, burns and wounds heal much faster and itchies go away quicker, too… I spray it on my face and take it internally once or twice a day. Some athletes claim it gives them more endurance; friends of mine in their late 60’s say that it makes them feel younger and takes away the wrinkles and age spots.  I have been spraying it on Cici and it helped with the bloody spot (did not want it to get infected)… and will keep on spraying her and me as well as give it internally.  She does not like it if I pour it into her mouth but she likes it when I spray it into her mouth. Am also getting her some Dr. Harvey’s Shine (salmon oil for Omega 3’s) and chlorophyll and alfalfa and Ester C, all to help her immune system.

http://asea.myvoffice.com/suemagic/

 http://vimeo.com/asea/review/50508279/3e1ab4f330

Blog Hop time…thanks to Life with DogsTwo Little Cavaliers and Confessions of the Plume…  grab the blog hop  link

6 Comments

Filed under allergies, animal communication, dog health, dogs, holistic healing for animals, keep pets safe, Monterey, natural health remedies, pet blog hop, pet care, Uncategorized

Spring Allergies

 

Nation’s Largest Pet Insurer Reveals Most Common Causes of Veterinary Visits

Just like their human counterparts, when pets are afflicted with even seemingly minor ailments such as an ear infection, stomach ache or cough, it can prompt a visit to the doctor. While the majority of these conditions are rarely life threatening, they can become chronic and expensive to treat. Veterinary Pet Insurance Co. (VPI) policyholders spent more than $58 million in 2012 treating the 10 most common medical conditions affecting their pets. VPI, the nation’s oldest and largest provider of pet health insurance, recently sorted its database of more than 485,000 insured pets to determine the top 10 dog and cat medical conditions in 2012.  Ear infections traditionally topped the list for dogs, but for the first time in the last five years, skin allergies now lead the way. Below are the results:

Screen shot 2013-04-08 at 5.50.26 PM

Dogs

1. Skin Allergies
2. Ear Infection
3. Skin Infection
4. Non-cancerous Skin Growth
5. Upset Stomach/Vomiting
6. Arthritis
7. Intestinal Upset/Diarrhea
8. Bladder Infection
9. Periodontitis/Dental Disease
10. Bruise or Contusion

Cats

1. Bladder Infection
2. Periodontitis/Dental Disease
3. Overactive Thyroid
4. Chronic Kidney Disease
5. Upset Stomach/Vomiting
6. Diabetes
7. Intestinal Upset/Diarrhea
8. Skin Allergies
9. Lymphosarcoma (Cancer of Lymph Node)
10. Upper Respiratory Infection

“Although a few of the top 10 dog and cat conditions can be associated with an animal’s natural aging process, many of the conditions listed above can occur in any pet,” said Dr. Carol McConnell, DVM, MBA, vice president and chief veterinary medical officer for VPI. “Regardless of the age or breed of the dog or cat, pet owners should familiarize themselves with their pets’ daily routine in order to identify abnormal behaviors that might indicate an injury or illness.”

In 2012, VPI received more than 68,000 canine claims for skin allergies, the most common cause for taking a dog to see a veterinarian. The average claim fee was $96 per office visit. For cats, a bladder infection was the most common reason to take your kitty to the veterinarian. VPI received more than 4,000 medical claims for this ailment – with an average claim amount of $251 per office visit.

The most expensive canine condition on the list (arthritis) cost an average of $258 per visit, while, for cats, the most expensive condition (lymphosarcoma) cost an average of $415 per visit. In addition to familiarizing themselves with their pets’ routine and behavior, pet owners should schedule their pets’ semiannual veterinary examinations on a regular basis to help prevent and identify certain conditions before they become serious or costly.

Pet owners can find more information about VPI Pet Insurance, call 800-USA-PETS (800-872-7387) or visit petinsurance.com.

73496_10151212152302267_1133399496_n

If your dog is suffering from the itchies from Spring allergies, you might consider that with Spring Flowers also comes Spring / Summer Pollens…

As well as, Achoo for Us Humans and Itchy / Paw Chewing, Gunky Ears for our DOGs

Many Pet Parents with Itchy DOGs are not aware that their Canine Friend Suffers from the Same Enviro Allergy TroubleMakers as You Do !

85% of our Allergy DOGs have Enviro Allergies.

Cici and I have found out the best remedy for doggie allergies is Doggy Goo and it tastes good, too, so it is easy to give to the dog. She thinks it is a wonderful treat.  We have tried baths, change of diets and slathering her with creams and spraying her with other stuff, too… but Doggy Goo works from the inside out…

More info:

http://www.doggygoo.com/

Do you / Your Dog Live in the TOP Allergy Cities in the USA ?

The Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA) has once again compiled a list of the most challenging places to live for people with allergies.

Despite the persisting cooler temps, the AAFA predicts a longer, strong spring allergy season, partially due to more extreme weather conditions.

Here are the TOP 10 ALLERGY Cities in the USA

1  Jackson, MS
2  Knoxville, TN
3  Chattanooga, TN
4  McAllen, TX
5  Louisville, KY
6  Wichita, KS
7  Dayton, OH
8  Memphis, TN
9  Oklahoma City, OK
10 Baton Rouge, LA
To find Your City, visit the below Link…

http://allergycapitals.com/downloads/AAFA_Dymista_Spring_Allergy_Capitals.pdf

For more info about Doggy Goo (CICI LOVES licking this peanut buttery best tasting dog medicine that seems like a treat), http://www.healthygoo.com/

2 Comments

Filed under allergies, cats, dog health, dogs, itchy red ears, keep pets safe, pet care, pet insurance, Uncategorized

Hare today: rabbits in the raw

If you live in the Monterey Bay area from Carmel to Pacific Grove, Marina to Gilroy, there is a rabbit farmer in Hollister who delivers raw ground rabbit food for dogs for FREE in the area with a minimum purchase of 10lbs..

He feeds them native grasses, each package is 2 lb. which can be fed to a 60 lb. dog for a week, approximately.

Cici has been scarfing up the raw rabbits. She loves it.  I try not to think about the bunnies. The 2 pound package lasts about a week, so five packages should last the month, if you mix the ground rabbit with kibble or Dr. Harvey’s as I do and feed twice a day. Longer, if your dog is smaller than Cici. She weighs about 53-60 pounds. She has stopped itching, too. No more allergies… allergies be gone dog food !

It is all natural raw dog food, ground rabbit with bone and organ meat included. It has NO preservatives, additives or antibiotics. It is all fresh and healthy. It comes frozen in 2lb packages. And it is very affordable. I did some research on other sites and found prices of $100 for 10 pounds of raw rabbit meat.  Feed your dogs rabbit tartare. Or you can cook the meat and feed your dog cooked rabbit. Either way, it is a nice change of pace (see health benefits below).

Check out the Rabbit in the Raw facebook page

3E63M63Ic5Ge5K65P5ccs4514ec2f60441f3d

If you have any Questions feel free to call Charly at 831 673 2287. He can answer your questions and will enjoy meeting you and your dogs!

Rabbit Meat:  Is classified as poultry.  Like chicken or turkey but is extremely lean with more protein and significantly less fat.  But unlike the common proteins of chicken and turkey dogs and cats that are allergic to poultry can usually digest rabbit without allergy symptoms.  Other benefits of rabbit meat include the following:  there is no cholesterol found in rabbit meat making it a fantastic option for dogs that have a history of cardiac disease.  Rabbit meat contains fewer calories when comparing ounce per ounce of chicken, turkey, beef, and lamb making it a fantastic option for dogs needing to lose a few pounds without significantly cutting the portion size.  Rabbit meat is a very “heart-friendly” protein source, and makes a great choice for allergic, overweight or sensitive pets.

Leave a comment

Filed under allergies, animals, Bay area, bunny rabbits, Carmel, dogs, farm animals, food, four paws up, healthy dog food, homemade dog food, K9 approved, keep pets safe, Monterey, Pacific Grove, product review, Uncategorized