Category Archives: cats

Fleas, fox tails and allergies, oh my

 Happy Holidays!!!

 

Well, this week Cici and I had a scary emergency and yesterday she had to have surgery. She has been itching again and I have not seen any fleas. But apparently there have been some. Maybe they are invisible? Well, she was scratching a lot and rolling on her back a lot, even on the concrete. And then she got all splotchy and blotchy and doing the zoomies in the house and being completely weird and whacko. She was going NUTS. And then, she scratched up the carpet by the front door. She has NEVER done that in all of the time I’ve had her (7 years!) and at 3 a.m. in the morning I discovered her ear had swollen up. It felt like and looked like the leaf of an aloe vera leaf. I Googled it and found out that she had blood in her ear. Then the blood started seeping out of her ear and forehead. I was distraught and upset and well, you know crazed. I called the vet asap and set up an appointment for surgery. (The best way to drain the blood).

And yesterday morning at 8 am, Cici had her ear  drained of blood. And now she is wearing a cone (for a few weeks) and has sutures in her ear. She looks like an alien. Not sure if you can tell that from the photo below. And she has lots of pills to take in hot dogs (so that is not so bad). Am VERY relieved.

I think what happened was that Cici had a fox tail, one in each ear, a LARGE one in the ear that filled up with blood and when she was scratching and shaking her head, the blood vessels burst and developed into a hematoma. (Read more about a hematoma below).

 

Photo on 2014-04-18 at 08.07

Am VERY thankful for my anipals online, Susan S., Dana, Fifi LeBon Bon, and friends who gave me lots of moral support and one anonymous donor who helped foot the BIG vet bill.

I also want to thank Carie Broecker of Peace of Mind Dog Rescue who helped support with volunteers who drove us to and from the vet as well as picked up medicine for Cici. Ironically, Carie’s cat Betty Boop just had similar surgery as Cici’s, although for a different reason.

http://www.peaceofminddogrescue.org/index.php

photo

 

ALSO, I must mention, and hope that you would like to join me in seeing how we can set up an emergency pet health care system for low income families so that NO animal can be turned away from the medical vet care that they need because of lack of funds of the owner. It was an extremely situation for me as it was but then when the vet tells you that you have to come up with a large amount of cash ASAP, the crisis escalates. Some folks give up their pets to a shelter at that point. Or they post fundraising pleas for donations. All in all it is a VERY humiliating and difficult situation that WE NEED TO CHANGE.  Most of us do not have extra cash, especially when living on a fixed income. If anyone wants to donate for Cici’s vet bill, please paypal us at prmatchmaker at yahoo.com.

 

 

Hematoma

A hematoma is an accumulation of blood under the skin. In the case of the ear this occurs as a result of damage to the ear flap in the pet that shakes its head excessively or scratches at the ear. Those pets with “floppy ears” are more prone to this condition although erect ear dogs and cats are occasionally affected.

The excessive shaking / scratching by the pet is often due to ear canal irritation. This may be due to ear infection (germs or foxtails), ear mites (small bugs that live in the ear canal), allergies (causing “itchy ears”), or fleas (that travel into the ear canal). The self-trauma ruptures the blood vessel inside of the ear flap, causing the blood clot.  This hematoma separates the cartilage from the skin of the ear flap and causes the painful swelling.

If the hematoma is not drained the ear will remain painful for a period of time and then start to scar down on its own. This scarring creates a visible deformity of the ear that is permanent and may lead to future ear complications.

There are numerous treatment approaches that can be used:

  1. Aspiration of the hematoma (with a needle & syringe) and bandage of the ear flap for 3-4 weeks. This treatment is the least expensive but also fails 75% of the time. It is considered an “economic alternative” when other methods of repair are not possible.
  2. Drainage of the blood clot with a local anesthetic and placement of a special plastic drain tube into the ear flap is another method of treatment. A bandage is also used for many weeks (even after the tube is removed). This treatment has a higher success rate than simple aspiration (approx. 50%), is somewhat more expensive, but is also considered an “economic alternative” to recommended treatment.
  3. Surgical drainage of the hematoma and applying stitches in the ear (utilizing a special foam ear pad) is the recommended treatment for this problem. The sutures actually serve to reattached the skin of the ear back to the cartilage. This allows for better, faster healing and often eliminates the need for a bandage. The success rate is greater than 98% with this treatment method. Two follow-up visits are required over a 3-week period.

Once the pet has had the hematoma corrected surgically it is rare to see a recurrence in the same ear although without thorough treatment of the underlying problem it could occur with the opposite ear flap.

HOME THERAPY MAY CONSIST OF:

  1. Administration of oral medication or antibiotics
  2. Using medicated ear drops
  3. A special plastic collar to prevent further scratching of the ear flap during healing.

 

Beware of fox tails

http://pets.webmd.com/dogs/foxtail-grass-and-your-dog

So the moral of this story is KEEP YOUR DOGS and CATS safe and out of the foxtails. Make sure that the fleas stay far away. And if your dog gets allergies in the spring, give them what they need to stop the itching.

 

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Filed under adoption, allergies, animal rescue, cats, dog cone collar, dog crazy, dog health, dog rescue, dog with cone, dogs, ear infection, holistic healing for animals, holistic vet, itchy red ears, keep pets safe, paypal, pet care, Uncategorized

Howling Pet Obsessions

People are dressing up their pets for Halloween next week and it is getting crazy out there… and here…

You have just a few more days to send me your pet photos for our Howloween contest… You might just win a cool scary prize BOO…

Now, here is the skinny on how much pet parents are spending on Halloween costumes for their pets. It could make you HOWL…

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http://millionairecorner.com/Content_Blog/Heather-Couture-Corner-Halloween-Costumes-You-and-Your-Pet.aspx

“Trends for 2013 show that the most popular pet costumes are the following: a pumpkin, a hot dog as a close second, cat, and devil.

“….According to a National Retail Federation Spending Survey, Halloween is second only to Christmas in spending and since 2005 spending on Halloween has increased 54.7 percent with total spending estimated to reach $6.9 billion in 2013.

“A good portion of the spending for Halloween comes in buying human costumes, but of the people surveyed, an additional 13.8 percent of pet parents plan on dressing up their four-legged companions as well.

“An estimated $330 million will be spent on finding just the right costume for Fido or Fluffy. This number has jumped an astonishing 65% since 2010.

“…Pet parents could once count on their favorite retailer only carrying a few selections of pet Halloween costumes, but today, there are literally hundreds of choices. This is especially true when you add online retailers into the equation”.

http://shine.yahoo.com/pets/americans-spend-330-million-halloween-pet-costumes-235900559.html

15 signs that you are obsessed with your dog

of course…

10. You take your dog on vacation with you.

(and I would add and you write a whole blog about it, ha ha ha)…

http://www.buzzfeed.com/cvlee12/15-signs-that-you-are-obsessed-with-your-dog-fs6g

 


Blog Hop time…thanks to Life with DogsTwo Little Cavaliers and Confessions of the Plume…  grab the blog hop  link 

 

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Filed under adoption, Adventure, all you need is a dog, animals, blogging, canine cuteness, cats, contest, dog crazy, dog friendly, dog travel, dog wear, dogs, halloween for dogs, laughter is the best medicine, pet blog hop, puppy love, spoil your dog rotten, travel with dog, women with dogs

The Furriest Halloween Contest

We’re so excited to announce the 1st annual Halloween Costume Photo Contest!   We’d love for you and your pets to join us!

The rules are simple. Check it out:

  1. Take a photo of your pet all decked out in its Halloween best and email it to me at prmatchmaker at yahoo.com from October 3rd to the day before Halloween, October 30. Use the words “Contest Photo” in your email subject line.
  2. Include your pet’s name, age, breed, and your first and last name.
  3. We’ll add your pet’s photo to the official Costume Photo Album on our NEW Facebook page, Cici the Polka Dot Princess.

It’s your chance to show off your pet in her Halloween best!  We’ve got great prizes for the 3 pets that win!

Prizes include your very own copy of The Sound and the Furry by Spencer Quinn. And to honor the book, please dress your pooch up as an ALLIGATOR…can be a homemade costume, store bought or whatever, use your imagination !  Creativity will be rewarded.

alligator_dog

Screen shot 2013-10-03 at 7.43.05 AM

Spring Naturals dog food and other treats will also be given to the winners.

http://celiasue.com/2013/09/20/senior-pets-rock/

Halloween Safety Tips For Pets

Pet costumes are cute. And Halloween can be spooky for dogs. Be sure that your dog is safe in the neighborhood when you head out with her on Halloween. Pets do not always enjoy the sights and sounds of Halloween. Here are a few precautions to take to keep them safe:

1. Make sure your pet is wearing a collar with an ID tag with your current contact information and that the microchip has up to date info, too.

2. Keep your pet on a leash. There may or may not be a lot of kids or teens where you live outside going trick or treating door to door. But be safe and control your pet with a leash. You never know when your dog might see a cat or decide s/he wants to chase or run off and scavenge or explore.

3. Make special Halloween treats for your pets. Give your dog a new bone, some doggie biscuits, dog jerky or dog cookies. But do not give candy to dogs or cats. Chocolate, nuts, raisins and candy with ingredients like xilothil and other “sugar-free” chemicals can be life threatening and even fatal for dogs.  

4. When you are at home entertaining trick or treaters or having your own party, keep your pets in a safe place behind a closed door or gate. Otherwise, your pets might quickly get outside without a leash and get spooked, stolen or get into trouble.

5. Pets should stay indoors on Halloween night, especially black cats and even dogs that are outside. There is a high incidence of pets being stolen during the month of October, and you do not want your pets to become a statistic.

6. Have your own Halloween party for your pets and invite the neighborhood pawpals. Give out baskets of pet treats, play games and give our prizes for the best costumes !

BOO ! Share your plans for Halloween, the spookiest night of the year in the comments below and on our Facebook page, and be sure to send us your pet’s photo.

 

 


Blog Hop time…thanks to Life with DogsTwo Little Cavaliers and Confessions of the Plume…  grab the blog hop  link 

 

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A child’s pet

how can you teach your children about a pet dying?

The time has come… that inevitable time, when a family member, a beloved pet, has lived its life to the fullest, been run over by a car, or has a life threatening illness. How do you tell your children? How can you help them cope with the death?  Should you have a funeral for the pet? Do you talk about the pet and express feelings?

I recently watched the movie Marley and Me and thought that they did a good job of helping the children deal with the death of their beloved dog Marley. The father took Marley to the vet and Marley was put to sleep there. He brought the dog’s body back to their home and they buried him in the earth. The children were encouraged to each write something, to express their feelings to and about Marley and put it in the casket/earth. And the children’s thoughts and feelings were acknowledged and praised. The girl child drew a picture, one of the boys wrote a letter, and the other boy, oldest, just said “He knows.” Each of the children were respected and the dog was buried with dignity and love. The children’s emotions were allowed to be expressed. Sadness, grief, and loss were also modeled by the parents. The children were appropriately comforted. They each had a chance to say good-bye.

Perhaps this movie is a good one to share with children when they lose a pet. Talk about the pet. Share memories, photos, videos and allow the children to grieve in their own way, in their own time. Having a ritual such as a burial helps, allowing the grieving members of a family to come together to say good-bye to the pet in their own way.

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Below are some more tips.

http://www.backupcare.org/blog/how-to-help-your-kids-deal-with-the-death-of-a-pet/

http://www.griefhealing.com/column-explaining-the-funeral-to-your-children.htm

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Filed under Best Friends, cats, children and dogs, dogs, pet care, Uncategorized

Dogs just wanna eat

Today we have an interview with Kate Solisti, who has graced us with wonderful info about dog diets and nutrition and has written numerous books about Pet Communication… welcome…

 

 

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tell us a little bit about yourself including how many dogs you have or have had and other pets, experience with pets, and so on… 

I have been an animal communicator since 1992. Over the years I’ve written 4 books and edited an anthology, “Kinship with Animals.” My books have been published in 7 languages and focus on interspecies communication, teachings from the animals, dog & cat nutrition, flower essence support and more, addressing the whole companion animal — body, mind and spirit.

My beloved dog Mollie, a sheltie cross, is in spirit and I currently have three wonderful feline companions, Azul, Simon and Lily.

is there any specific diet that you recommend for pet parents that is the best for dogs optimum health or does the diet depend upon different factors?  (age, size, weight, breed)?

I believe in meeting guardians where they are in terms of time, budget and level of commitment to their animal’s health. There is no “one perfect” diet for all animals. Breed, age, activity level, stress level, individual food sensitivities etc. are all critical pieces to take into consideration when counseling a guardian in nutrition and meal planning for their companions. Of course, the fresher, more “whole foods”  in the diet, the better. Highly processed, inexpensive dry food is not nutritious and will not support a dog or cat in living a long, healthy life.

guidelines for nutrition? 

Again, the freshest foods are the best. Many animals thrive on a raw diet, but some, especially older animals, need their fresh foods lightly cooked. The next best, is high quality canned foods and a little dry with eggs, real meat and healthy “table scraps” added in proper proportions’. A diet of all canned or all dry is not ideal. Dry food is not okay by itself. Do not be fooled by advertising or pretty packaging. You need to READ the ingredients to be sure they are real meats and vegetables. Avoid any type of gluten, soy, corn, sugars, like maltodextrin and corn syrup and all by- products, colorings and additives like BHA and BH (known carcinogens). Remember, if you wouldn’t eat it, why would you feed it to your dog?

are there supplements that you recommend for dogs?

Two of my favorite stand-bys are digestive enzymes and probiotics. I can safely say that all animals eating dry or canned foods exclusively need these to help break down the food and absorb nutrients. Most animals, especially elderly and rescued animals, really benefit from these two supplements. Animals eating raw foods get live enzymes from their fresh food. Enzymes are destroyed in the cooking process. Any dog who has been on antibiotics and medications needs probiotics to help rebuild good, healthy gut bacteria that is essential for absorption of nutrients and a healthy immune system. Some dogs need to be on these all the time, others during times of stress.

are there factors to consider in regard to feeding your pet?

Yes, each animal must be understood as an individual and fed according to their needs.

do you find that most pet parents feed their dogs/pets kibble and canned foods or does it vary?

Yes, most do simply because they and their veterinarians are uninformed about what dogs & cats need to eat to stay healthy. I often learn that prescription diets are fed for too long and never reevaluated. As I said above, dry food is not okay by itself. Would you want to eat dry cereal every day? Would that be good for you? Well it isn’t for most dogs either.

do most dogs love peanut butter, bacon, cheese? 

It seems so. I believe that they are attracted to the fat and salt in these foods.

what is the weirdest food a dog you have spoken to liked? 

Oh my. There have been too many to list. Dogs are part of Nature’s cleanup crew, so they will try almost anything!

are dogs carnivores?

Yes, dogs are carnivores. All you have to do is look at their teeth to see this. They are almost omnivores, but again, their teeth put them plainly in the carnivore crew.

does that mean a raw diet of meat is best ?

a raw BALANCED diet with muscle, organ, connective tissue, blood, and VERY importantly bone is best for SOME dogs. The key to a balanced raw diet is to “build a bird or mammal.” Many people think mixing up a batch of ground meat, chopped veggies and a little cottage cheese is fine, but it is not balanced.  A raw or cooked homemade diet MUST be balanced correctly or it will cause dangerous deficiencies in the dog or cat. There are a few excellent supplements that can be added to a homemade diet if you can’t grind up bone and know you have the right amounts of proper vitamins and minerals.

should dogs eat grains or a grain-free diet?

Again, this depends on the dog.

is a grain free diet healthy for dogs?

For most dogs, grain-free is best. But others do better with some cooked grains in their diet. I usually prefer quinoa over most other grains. Rice is beneficial when there are digestive issues, but not necessary once the digestive tract returns to normal.

is there a flea free diet? itch free diet?  a diet that repels fleas, ticks and other bugs? 

I am not aware of a “diet” per se, but adding a small amount of garlic and nutritional yeast is often a very helpful flea and tick deterrent. As for itching, there are many causes of that. One simple thing to give to see if it helps is the right essential fatty acids. This would be fats from meats, fish (salmon, trout, sardines) or fish oils or other marine lipid oils. Some dogs do well with coconut oil. Be careful. Many fish oils, especially the generic and inexpensive ones, can be rancid and unhealthy for your companion. I have done a lot of research on the subject and recommend a specific, sustainably grown and harvested marine lipid supplement. It is the cleanest source I know of and has more anti-inflammatory properties than fish oil.

what do you feed your dogs?

If I had a dog, she would most likely eat a raw diet with lots of variety just as my cats do.

this is senior dog month, what age is a dog considered senior?

In my opinion, senior is as senior does! I read someone’s blog the other day and his dog is 11 years old and he considers his dog a senior Some say that my dog, just turned 7, is becoming a senior… does age depend upon breed? diet?  Well gosh, 11 is 77 in dog years and 7 is only 49! Yes, condition is key for me in determining a dog’s “senior status.” I have watched dogs with all the symptoms of old age, literally age backwards with a correct diet and the right supplements — specific supplements that I have come to focus on due to their exceptional benefits in a short time.

is there a consensus from dogs on any of the above? what do the dogs have to say about dog food?

Of course we all know “picky” dogs, but most dogs LOVE food, most foods. I will say though that the biggest “consensus” is around nourishing food. Dogs want and need to be nourished first and foremost. Without proper nourishment, they cannot accomplish their missions with their people and lead fulfilling lives. (Just like us.)

anything else that you would like to share?

 

Thank you CeliaSue for your good questions and devotion to helping people learn about good nutrition for their dogs. I am available for private phone consultations on diet planning, health and behavior. Please visit my website, www.akinshipwithanimals.com for all the details. Looking forward to hearing from you all and helping you create the ideal diet for your dogs (and cats too.)

 

http://akinshipwithanimals.com/?action=healing

 

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Pets over the bridge

Pet communication comes in various forms. It is amazing what we can learn from our pets when we are willing / open to listening to them. Sometimes, we just don’t know how or are so busy worrying or scattered, filled with our daily lives that we miss the subtle and sometimes not to subtle messages.

Here are a few of my experiences communicating with pets here and also some who have crossed over the Rainbow Bridge…

* a dog I hardly had a relationship with passed… and he came to me in a dream, he was a German shepherd, I think he just wanted to let me know he was safe and at peace…

* my cat Abundance of five years came to me in a dream a number of years after he had run away and he came to me sitting on my belly purring like he used to do in life… it was a visit that was very healing for me because i was devastated when he left and i felt at peace that he had come back to me after he had passed on

before Abundance left the earthly plane, we were having some amazing communications… I had interviewed Susan McElroy who taught me a bit about pet communication. She said to use images rather than words… I was practicing with my two cats Abundance and Precious while I was working at Best Friends Animal Sanctuary… one morning, I was sitting at my computer and Abundance kept meowing and bugging me… finally, I decided to tune into what he was trying to tell me. Immediately, I saw that I had accidentally put my other cat Precious in a room with a closed door with no litter box, no food, nor water… Abundance was meowing to let me know to get Precious out of there. I opened the door and sure enough, he was in there and scooted out.

* a white cat that i was feeding in the neighborhood, i found out a few others were feeding her too…. got that she was very sick, she was very very skinny… took her to a vet and the vet said she had cancer and not much to do for her, and would be very expensive but not much hope… suggested euthanasia as the humane choice, i cried all the way to the spca in pasadena with this cat… they let me be with her in a room before the procedure…. I prayed with her and saw her being lifted up into my father’s and family’s arms/hands into heaven while the procedure was going on… she was met by loving people when she passed…

* with my dog Cici, she responds MUCH MUCH better to me when I communicate telepathically to her than when I verbalize. She actually listens and does what i ask her to do (usually not always)…

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how about you? are your pets psychically attuned to you? do you listen and decipher their messages easily?  is your pet telepathic?  Can you use your intuition with your pet to understand what they want/need?

I believe that we are all intuitive, people and pets. And that we can learn to “tune in or tap into” the messages. Just like learning to listen to a sound from a frequency that we are not used to being able to hear. We can become quiet within and within that stillness hear messages, see message and more. Our loved ones including our pets love to “speak” to us and love it when we listen to them.

The loss of a beloved pet can be truly painful and difficult to deal with. A compassionate ear and heart and having been there can help a lot. When I lost Abundance, a “friend” kept telling me, it’s just a cat. She surely did NOT understand what I was going through. To me, Abundance was MUCH more than “just a cat.” He was a beloved companion of five years and a family member. He was my heart and soul and every little thing reminded me of him. I was in a lot of pain and did not think I could bear it. The sadness and grief was overwhelming.

Have you longed to hear from a pet who has crossed the bridge?  I’d be happy to do a session with you and your pet(s). It can be one of the most healing experiences for a pet parent that is going through the grieving process.

Email or call me to set up a time (over the phone) at 702-225-8206.

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Filed under Adventure, all you need is a dog, All you need is love, animals, cats, dog speak, dogs, dreams, K9 approved, keep pets safe, Rainbow Bridge, Uncategorized

Teach your Children well

When a child learns to love animals, she’s learning the art of compassion and developing the necessary emotional skills to empathize with other living beings. Kids naturally seem to gravitate towards animals, but loving and properly caring for them are skills that must be learned, rather than innate abilities. When you foster a love of animals in your child, you’re helping her to learn the importance of looking out for those that have trouble helping themselves and the necessity of being gentle, patient and affectionate. Kids that are taught to look after animals and to treat them with respect are learning the fundamentals of social interaction by understanding that it’s not okay to be a bully or to take advantage of weaker beings. Instilling that love and compassion, however, can be a bit of a challenge if you don’t know where to start.

Get a Pet

The quickest and most direct route to helping your little one learn to love animals is helping them learn to love one animal in particular. One that lives in your home and is part of the family, not a puppy that’s banished to a kennel in the backyard when he struggles with housebreaking or is figuring out not to chew up shoes. It’s important that you carefully research your options before bringing a pet home, though. The last thing you want to do is present your child with a pet and encourage her to love it, only to send it away when the animal doesn’t suit your lifestyle. Remember that a commitment to pet ownership is a promise you make for life, not a decision to be made on a whim.

Model Compassionate Attitudes

When you’re trying to do something and the family dog is barking incessantly, your first instinct may be to shout something rude like, “shut up” or “that dumb dog.” While you’re only venting your frustration and saying things that you don’t mean, your children are observing you and taking cues from your behavior to determine how they’re supposed to react. Modeling respectful behavior means that you not only let your children see you behaving in a loving and compassionate manner, but that you help them to understand why it’s never okay to call anyone names or demean them, even if they’re getting on your nerves or can’t understand your words.

Think Twice About Shelter Volunteering

At first blush, volunteering at your local animal shelter may seem like an ideal way to help your kids learn about compassionate animal care if you can’t take in a pet of your own. It’s actually not the best idea, as evidenced by the policies of the shelters themselves. Many animal shelters won’t even allow kids under the age of 16 to volunteer, and there are reasons for that policy that extend far beyond insurance and liability concerns.

Helping out at a shelter will allow your child to help cats learn to socialize, to walk puppies and to learn the basics of animal care. It will also teach them to love individual animals, and can lead to heartbreak when they eagerly come in to find that a favorite has been adopted into another home. Even worse, your little one would have to deal with the inevitability of losing a furry friend if he volunteers at a shelter that euthanizes when they reach capacity. Before you start looking for shelters that will allow kids to volunteer, make sure you’re working with no-kill shelters and that your child is well prepared for the day that his favorites go home to their new, forever families.

Watch Your Language

When you’re walking down the street and you see a strange dog without a leash, the compulsion to protect your child is an instinctual one. Rather than pulling your youngster to the other side of the street with an explanation about how the dog could bite him or be dangerous, consider your language carefully. Instilling a fear that every dog could bite him is only teaching your child to fear all dogs, not to love and respect them. Try explaining that every dog is different, and that it’s smart to only approach dogs that he knows, or that some dogs aren’t used to strangers. Teaching an instinctual fear of something different not only imparts a fear of all dogs, but also sends the message that they’re to be avoided at all costs. Rather than commenting on how gross a frog is, talk about how neat his skin feels. Don’t use negative adjectives when you describe animals, because your child’s ideas are formed by what he gleans from your words.

http://www.becomeananny.com/blog/how-to-foster-a-love-of-animals-in-children/

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Filed under adoption, cats, dogs, media madness, pet care

Blog the Change: Adopt me

The No Kill Conference just happened last week.

A few highlights:

From
Nathan Winograd keynote speech.

“There are over 500 cities across the country saving over 90%, 95%… Even 97%, 98% and 99% of their open admission shelter population. What are you waiting for?

“Whether a rescuer, shelter director, or activist, YOU can make a difference!”

In June, the No Kill Advocacy Center sponsored Just One Day where more than 10,000 pets were adopted in just one day (June 11) all over the country. Each year they ask shelters across the country to put down their euthanasia needles for a day and instead adopt animals out. And if they can do it for one day, they can do it for another and another.

But PETA says to leave the shelters alone and refuses to stop killing for even one day.

http://www.nathanwinograd.com/?p=13122

PETA has been getting some interesting coverage due to their high kill rates and unwillingness to adopt out healthy and adoptable pets.

“As word spreads about PETA’s high use of euthanization, the animal-rights group itself could become the subject of protest. If PETA cannot commit to the “no kill” philosophy practiced by organizations in the pro-animal community, it will forfeit the moral right to speak out about others’ inhumane actions.”

Read more: http://www.post-gazette.com/stories/opinion/editorials/peta-kills-the-animal-rights-group-is-big-on-euthanasia-695479/#ixzz2Z8Ftyq17

Watch a film all about the benefits of adopting a shelter pet…

SHELTER ME is an entertaining and uplifting film series about shelter pets improving the lives of those who adopt them. Hosted by actress Katherine Heigl, SHELTER ME celebrates the human-animal bond with positive, uplifting stories about shelter pets and their new homes. Every year, 3-4 million dogs and cats are euthanized in America’s shelters. SHELTER ME focuses on the success stories to bring more people into the shelters to give these incredible animals a second chance.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2313299/

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Filed under adoption, animal rescue, cats, dogs, fountain of woof, no kill shelters, pet adoption, pet care, Uncategorized

Pet music

Interview with Lisa Spector, co-creator of Through a Dog’s (and now Cat’s) ear music…

About Lisa Spector

Lisa Spector is a concert pianist, Juilliard graduate, and canine music expert. By combining her passion for music with her love of dogs, she co-founded Through a Dog’s Ear.

As a concert pianist, Lisa has won first prizes in Chopin competitions in New York and Los Angeles and has performed in China, Poland, Spain, France, Italy and throughout the U.S.

Note:  July 4th and Fireworks. Many dogs have issues with loud noises from thunderstorms and fireworks. Many run off and go missing on this holiday. My Cici does not usually have any issues with fireworks unless big noises are up close and personal… and this year, it sounded like some big KABOOMS were right outside our door… she was looking a bit concerned. so I put on our Through a Dog’s Ear calming canine music (thanks to the wonderful Lisa Spector and Cici calmed down, was sleepy, then I jumped into bed with her and cuddled, and we both just slept thru all of the noisy fireworks for about three hours)… zzzzzzzzzzz… the music really conks Cici and me out…

Lisa has been busy creating an IPawd for doggies with ALL kinds of canine calming music…   Through A Dog’s Ear is clinically demonstrated to relieve canine anxiety issues.  ICalmDog is a portable, compact player with built-in speaker and battery. With an auto-repeat function, the 4-hours of pre-loaded Through a Dog’s Ear music can be played for 12 hours at a time.

http://throughadogsear.com/samples/Calm_Canine_Companion_2/01-Vivaldi-Winter-Largo.mp3

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http://throughadogsear.com/icalmdog/

and she has also created music for felines that is similar to the doggie calming music CD’s but specifically for cats.

what is different (between the cat and dog music)?

from Joshua Leeds

Joshua Leeds is a sound researcher, music producer and educator. He is one of few published authorities in the field of psychoacoustics—the study of the effects of music and sound on the human nervous system. Publications include Through a Dog’s Ear (Sounds True, 2008), The Power of Sound (Healing Arts Press, 2001), and Sonic Alchemy (InnerSong Press, 1997).

Sonic Anchoring is experimental. Our goal is to create a mental and emotional sense of safety that arises from familiarity. We accomplish this through a recognizable sequence of notes. The music on Through a Cat’s Ear is repetitious by design. Of fifteen tracks, six interludes are melodic fragments from Bach’s “Rondo Espressivo.” While people hear these interludes as repeating melodic intervals, cats may categorize this information as a familiar frequency matrix. As much as cats are hearing the music, they are feeling a sequence of vibrational frequencies. Like sensory information we instantly recognize—a favorite taste or aroma, our best friend’s voice, a mother’s touch— familiar sensory cues can have a profound and calming impact on the nervous system while providing psychological security.

Frequency Modulation (FM) can be defined as the alteration of sound. To further focus the therapeutic impact of Cat’s Ear, we’ve removed higher frequencies from the re-arranged piano music. FM also takes place in the mid- and low-frequency ranges. Through progressive modulation, “arousing” frequencies are reduced and “soothing” frequencies are increased.

TACats Vol. 1-cover-final

how are people responding to the cats music?

Initial response is wonderful. Like Through a Dog’s Ear, people are also finding Through a Cat’s Ear very relaxing for themselves.

Comments from an email today:

“Thank you for this fabulous CD for cats.  I am having construction in the house and my Abyssinian cat, Simba, has been extremely distressed about being locked in a back bedroom and hearing loud construction sounds.  He has been a nervous wreck with poor appetite, howling, and he even tried to run away. Your wonderful cat  CD came yesterday and I have been playing it for him this morning in a calm setting.  That cat is limp.  Purring.  Smiling.  

By the way, I love the music. Thinking of using it myself to help with sleep issues. And my dog, Suki the mini-poodle,  is draped upside down in her bed listening to the CD.

I think this is one of the best CDs you have done.  You and your colleagues have created something truly special.”

do cats hear differently from dogs?

Yes, they hear a much higher frequency than dogs. Their hearing range goes up to 65K Hz. However, the most important thing is how the frequency of sound affects the feline nervous system.

do cats have different traumas/fears phobias than dogs?

Yes, cats rarely have separation anxiety. But, they have much more of a need for consistency than dogs. Most dogs get very excited when a visitor comes to the front door. Many cats run and hide under a bed when visitors come in. Changes in their environment cause them stress.

what kinds of music do cats like?

That conversation is still up for exploration. When clinical studies of Through a Dog’s Ear were done, it was based on research in the shelter environment by a behaviorist, Deborah Wells. She tested a variety of types of music in the shelter environment and it showed that classical music calmed the dogs. So when we went into the recording studio, I played a variety of types of classical music, including re-arranged, slowed down, simplified versions of classical music that later became Through a Dog’s Ear.

However, there hasn’t been any music studies on cats. So we are not starting from the same place. We are very eager for researchers to run with this project and to put Through a Cat’s Ear and other music through clinical testing.

For more info and for listening samples:

http://throughadogsear.com/samples/

Blog Hop time…thanks to Life with DogsTwo Little Cavaliers and Confessions of the Plume…  grab the blog hop  link

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Tips for families who want pets

Pets are a great way to teach kids the importance of caring for another living thing, and give them a sense of responsibility. They’re also a lot of work, and their addition to the family is not a decision to be taken lightly. Before you bring your newest family member home, these are ten of the things that you should consider.

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http://www.liveinnanny.org/blog/10-things-to-think-about-before-getting-a-family-pet/

 

Dogs who are good with kids

http://www.dogster.com/dog-breeds/top-dogs-good-with-children

 

 

According to the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA), every year more than 4.5 million people in the United States are victims of dog bites

Kids are the No. 1 victims of dog bites. Surprisingly, the AVMA says most dog bites happen in the course of everyday activities with familiar dogs. Seniors are the second most common dog bite victims.

There are a variety of reasons dogs bite, and sometimes they are not the most obvious reasons. Dogs bite when they are afraid, feel threatened, get excited, are at play, have been trained to be aggressive, are being protective with food or treats, or are in pain or annoyed.

Tips to prevent dog bites:

  • Know the basics of a dog’s body language. A wagging tail does not always mean a dog is friendly. Depending on the carriage of the tail, it could mean the dog is nervous, stressed, and uneasy.
  • Teach children to never approach a stray dog under any circumstances. And if they are approached by a stray, they should “be a tree,” and not move until the dog moves away.
  • Never taunt a dog. If you dare a dog to bite you, he just might give you exactly what you’re asking for.
  • Don’t put your face in a dog’s face you don’t know. Children should be taught to never get up in a dog’s face, even the family pet. Many dogs read that as a challenge and react out of impulse to protect themselves.
  • Respect the growl. A growl is a warning from a dog that he may bite, and you should always believe him!
  • Never sneak up on a sleeping dog. Never approach a dog who is eating. Never back a dog into a corner where he feels he can’t escape.
  • Supervise all interactions between young children (under 10) and dogs at all times. Children forget to tie their shoes and make their beds, so naturally they could forget the correct way to play with and handle the family dog. An adult should always be present to make sure the rules are followed.

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Only YOU can prevent dog bites! http://ww.dogster.com/13V6X5q

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