Category Archives: keep pets safe

Doggie Day books

This week was National Dog Day, ok, we missed it by a day or two… well, here are three VERY different doggie books that you just HAVE TO READ if you love doggies… and you might just pick up a few for your fellow doggie friends for the holidays (which are going to be here sooner than your dog can chew up a dog bone).

 

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The exciting and funny / hilarious new Chet and Bernie book, Paw and Order, which you’ve all been waiting with doggie breath to come out so you can read it. Now you can.

Harry Truman once said “If you want a friend in Washington, get a dog.”

Cici and I were very happy to get our paws on the latest (7th in the series) Chet and BernieL book, Paw and Order because we are always up for another hilarious adventure seen thru Chet’s canine eyeballs. The story begins in New Orleans. And Bernie’s Porsche and a trip to a BBQ joint turns into a fiasco with some motorcycle dudes who have big necks.  But no matter, Chet and Bernie are on the case and a team not to be messed with.

The dog-eat-dog world of Washington DC will never be the same after Chet and Bernie’s Little adventure. They could have gone straight home from New Orleans but what fun would that have been? They instead detoured because well, Bernie’s sometime girlfriend Suzie the newspaper reporter is now working at the Washington Post and she is on a BIG story that she cannot talk about. So of course,  Chet sniffs around the capital city and Bernie ends up arrested. An international conspiracy unfolds and Chet encounters a strange new animal, a guinea pig, who holds the fate of the nation in his paws.

Chet and Bernie are always a winning combination. With Chet’s sharp eyes and cool nose and Bernie’s talents, they cannot lose, although it is always suspenseful along the way. Another great read for dog lovers, guinea pig aficionados, and Washington DC insiders and outsiders.

http://www.chetthedog.com/tag/paw-and-order

Off the Leash: A Year at the Dog Park  by Matthew Gilbert

If you have ever visited a dog park and met some strange, weird, quirky, bizarre dog people, then you will relate to this book. It is about an array of dogs and their people who gather at Amory Park, overlooking Boston near Fenway Park.

Matthew Gilbert, a longtime TV critic at The Boston Globe, describes his reluctant trip into the dog park subculture, as the first-time owner of a stubbornly social Yellow Lab puppy named Toby. Like many Americans, he was happily accustomed to the safe distance of TV viewing and cell-phone web surfing, tethered to the digital leash. But the headstrong, play-obsessed Toby pulls him to Amory, and Amory becomes an exhilarating dose of presence for him. The joyous chaos of wrestling dogs and the park’s cast of offbeat dog owners – the “pack of freaks” – gradually draw him into the here and now. At the dog park, the dog owners go off the leash, too.

Meetings at the dog park can be mayhem, chaotic and fun, depending upon  the day. Sort of a daily or weekly canine soap opera. Dogs love/hate one another as do their owners.  When the dogs have disagreements, so do their human companions. And sometimes the human beans are even worse than the dogs when they are off the leash.

This is a very funny, sunny, very right on, portrait of life at the dog park and relationships and encounters between dogs and the dog owners. Dog Parks: Enter at Your Own Risk. Dog parks are not for the faint of heart or skittish. And Gilbert knows right where the fun begins and ends.  His honest and enthusiastic memoir will make you rethink going to the dog park or yearning to find doggie friends and a pack to belong to.

 

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Dogs Rule, Nonchalantly by Mark Ulriksen is just plain silly. EVERYONE who is ANYONE with a DOG that is KNOWS that Dogs Rule. Of course, my Polka Dot Princess agrees with me on that one. She Rules this household. Of course.  Ulriken has been working for a little publication called The New Yorker, where he has been a regular contributor since 1993. He has achieved more than 40 magazine covers to his credit.   This book offers great illustrations of doggies, and funny lines to go with the images. We were offput by one illustration of what seemed to be a bad stereotype of a bully breed dog. We do not like those stereotypes as you know. Other than that, numerous breeds were represented in hilarious detail. And some of the jokes were VERY funny.  If you live or love a dog, you know how amusing they can be. And this book capitalizes upon canines and their goofyness with refreshing charm and a breath of doggie sunshine. Dogs penchant for stinky things. Dogs and their always sunny disposition (until you are leaving the house).  And you know the rest of their quirks.

http://dogsruleproject.com/

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Filed under animal books, animal stars, Best Friends, breeds, dog crazy, dog friendly, dog parks, dog speak, dogs, four paws up, K9 approved, keep pets safe, pet care, pet press, pit bull, shaggy dog story, silly dog, Uncategorized

Love, Hope and Forgiveness

Heroes Come in Different Species

 

An Abused Pit Bull and Human Survivor Share Hope and Healing

Some people see a pit bull and go running for the hills fearing that they will be maimed due to the sensationalizing of (and often untrue) pit bull attack stories overreported by the media. Then there are dog lovers and advocates who see a dog just like any other dog. Donna Lawrence is one of the latter. Yes, even after she WAS attacked by a pit bull.

 

A recent survey of people who admitted to having negative opinions of pit bulls, 60 percent of the participants cited media reports as the basis of their negative opinions.

 

“One person and one animal can make a powerful difference in the world,” said Donna. She survived an attack and later adopted an abused pit bull puppy who was set on fire. Her courage and commitment to dogs inspires people around the world.

 

Donna and Susie’s story of Love, Hope, Courage and Forgiveness has been made into a movie called Susie’s Hope which recently aired on UPTV.

 

The DVD will be released this fall, but you can preorder through Best Buy now!

 

http://www.bestbuy.com/site/susies-hope-dvd/25346296.p?id=3251052&skuId=25346296&st=Susie%27s%20Hope&lp=1&cp=1

 

Movie trailer:

 

 

Donna thought Susie was dead when she found her in a park. “My heart melted the instant I saw her. I had so much compassion for her. I saw this six week old puppy with third degree burns all over her body and I couldn’t understand how someone could do this to her. I had never seen abuse like this before. She was so little and frail with scars all over her body. Her ears were burned off. She had broken bones. Susie needed a lot of love and protection,” Donna explained.

 

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“As I held her, covered in bandages, she kissed my face.  She was so loving and just wanted me to hold her. I was captivated. We were kindred spirits. I could relate to her pain and suffering. She was wrongfully attacked. We both had a lot of physical and emotional scars and fears to conquer.”

A few weeks before she met Susie, Donna had been feeding her neighbor’s abandoned and abused pit bull who was chained up 24/7. One day the dog became aggressive and attacked Donna’s legs. She thought she was going to die.

It is important to note that the attack on Donna was not because the dog was a pit bull. The attack fit the profile cited in a recent report published in the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association (JAVMA)/  The report discusses dog bite prevention and cites factors involved in attacks. Breed is not a factor. The dog that attacked Donna was chained up (a resident dog not a pet), abused, neglected, not neutered and no able bodied person was there to intervene.

“I was working through some serious emotional turmoil, and one weekend when I had Susie in my care, I got the tragic news that I would never be able to have children—as a result of the attack. I cried all the way home from the doctor’s office.  When we got home, it was like God spoke to me,” Donna recalled. “You see that puppy, she has been abused, set on fire, and left for dead. Yet she is forgiving. She is not living in the past. She is happy and thankful to be alive.  She is moving on with her life and so can you. I want you to adopt her. I have big plans for you–bigger than you can imagine. And you will never fear dogs again.”  So, I listened to God. I let go of my hurt and anger and trusted in God that together we would bring healing to people and animals.”

Pit bulls and their bad reputation never bothered Donna. She considers pit bulls “loyal and affectionate dogs with loving hearts.”  Before the pit bull that attacked her and adopting Susie, Donna rescued another pit bull named Samson. “He was so sweet; I’d take him to the salon with me every day and he’d sit by the dryers while the gals got their hair done.  He’d look over their shoulders as if he was reading the magazines with them!”

Wanting justice (a punishment to fit the crime) for what happened to Susie, Donna was concerned that Susie’s abuser would go free. Animal cruelty laws were very lenient in North Carolina at the time and had not been changed in a very long time. The person who abused Susie was only given jail time because the court could charge him with destroying someone else’s property. Susie was treated as property rather than a living being. So, Donna helped to pass Susie’s Law with stiffer fines and jail time for animal abusers.

It  was a team effort. “In March 2010, we canvassed the state of North Carolina, sharing Susie’s story. We sent out emails, postcards and letters with our “request for change.”  We took Susie before the city council and county commissioners Votes were unanimous in the House and Senate (after taking one look at Susie).  The Bill was signed by Governor Perdue in June 2010, with Susie’s paw of approval. The law was put into effect in December 2010.”

“Remember, serial killers practice abusing animals first and then move on to innocent children and adults,” Donna declared.

Now, Donna has high hopes for the impact of the movie. “We hope that Susie’s Hope will start a nationwide movement, to bring national public and legislative awareness, to change laws in every state. Maybe even a national law to protect all animals. Some states have great animal cruelty laws, and then, some don’t. I hope the movie will motivate others to make a difference and change in their own state, or hometown, for the sake of the animals. I also hope the movie will motivate people to never give up on the things they are passionate about.”

Through Susie’s Hope™ the non-profit organization, Donna and Susie teach people how to treat animals properly.

 

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“Susie and I are on a mission to do all we can to stand up for the rights of animals. It is time for a change in our society. We need to stop turning the other cheek to abuse and start reporting abuse whenever we see it. We need to crack down on puppy mills and backyard breeding. Fight for changes in your own state. Let’s get animals off of chains and make them a part of the family. We hope people will take care of their pets, and learn how to be safe around them, to love and respect them.”

When Susie and Donna visit schools, “I usually ask the children to offer Susie a treat. I teach kids in the schools how to approach animals,and to always ask permission. Not all animals enjoy kids running up to them and getting in their face, or riding them like a horse. Children need to learn at an early age to respect an animal’s space and how to gently approach them.

“People need to understand animals have feelings and emotions just like we do. They feel pain, loneliness and rejection, and they know when they are loved–and when they are not.”

Susie turned five years old in June (2014). “Susie loves chasing her brother and sister dogs around in the yard. She loves going to work with me at the salon.  (She gives the clients kisses and shows off with her favorite tricks–riding a skateboard, jumping through a hula hoop, playing dead, counting, reading, pointing to colors, and more). She loves to eat peanut butter. She loves riding in the car and traveling.  I think she likes being my friend. Susie does like other doggies, but it takes her a bit to warm up to them–she has to make sure she can trust them.

“Susie and I are on a mission to do all we can to stand up for the rights of animals. It is time for a change in our society. We need to stop turning the other cheek to abuse and start reporting abuse whenever we see it in our neighborhoods, communities or our workplace. We need to crack down on puppy mills and backyard breeding. We want to encourage everyone to fight for changes in your own state and communities. Let’s get animals off of chains and make them a part of the family. We hope people will continue to educate children as well as adults in their own communities how to take care of their pets, and how to be safe around them, to love them and respect them,” she concluded.

Susie is a nominee in the American Human Association Hero Dog Awards contest. As the 2014 AHA Therapy Dog, please consider voting for her.  (Visit www.susieshope.com orwww.susieshope-nc.org for more information).

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Filed under adoption, all you need is a dog, All you need is love, animal abuse, animal rescue, bigotry against dogs, breed specific laws, dog movies, dog movies/TV, dog rescue, dogs, keep pets safe, pit bull, saved from fire, Uncategorized

Pets Home Alone

5 Ways to Help a Lonely Pet

Chronic loneliness and social isolation is not only debilitating for humans; dogs and cats can also suffer the psychological, and perhaps physical, impacts of being alone and not emotionally connected or engaged on a regular basis. Pet loneliness, which differs from separation anxiety, can manifest from a new or temporary situation triggered by changes like moving to a new home, a teenager going off to college, or a significant schedule alteration for the owner. More worryingly, it can be a long-term problem caused by prolonged seclusion—a situation that, unfortunately, becomes a way of life for many of our nation’s four-legged family members.

There is debate as to whether or not research on chronic loneliness, proven to have direct links to impeding both the mental and physical health of humans—including conditions like dementia, insomnia, anxiety, depression and potentially lethal heart disease—impacts pets in similar ways. More certainly, however, even beyond potential ominous health concerns, lonely pets can be unhappy, bored and lethargic. This often leads to a variety of unsavory behaviors and dissatisfaction for all involved. The more social the pet’s nature, the higher probability that problems will be present and persist.

 

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(Fortunately, my Cici, the Polka Dot Princess, is rarely home alone. And when she is, her couch or my bed or her house (her crate) are where she resides and sleeps until I come back).  But not all dogs are so lucky.  In addition to the list below, we would add, put the TV or radio on or some comforting canine music, give them a familiar article of clothing with your smell on it, and/or depending upon their level of separation anxiety, you might give them a dose of Rescue Remedy or another all natural calming remedy before you leave, to keep them happy. You could also bring them to doggie daycare or hire a pet sitter or dog walker on a regular basis if possible.

 

To help keep America’s dogs and cats more stimulated and satisfied during “alone time,” Paul Mann, Founder and CEO of FETCH! Pet Care, offers these 5 tips on how to avoid pet loneliness and turn this sad face into a happy doggie smile:  (you know the sad eyes face that they give you before you leave when they know they are not going with you)

 

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http://www.buzzfeed.com/paws/sad-puppies-that-will-ruin-your-day#27wh7po

 

 

  1. Exercise a pet before exiting: As close as possible to the time you leave a pet alone, give them a physical workout. Take your dog on a brisk walk or play a game of fetch, and play a game of laser tag or “chase the string” with your cat.This exercise will tire and calm your pet physically so they can utilize the alone time to catch up on rest and recuperation. It also exhilarates them emotionally, fostering a healthier state of mind.
  2. Arrange regular midday visits: The best-case scenario is when an owner can come home at least once during the business day, perhaps for lunch, to spend a little quality time with Fido or Felix.Those whose schedule or commute doesn’t always allow for this should consider hiring a professional dog walker or pet sitter who can stimulate your furry friend and provide regular affection, companionship, socialization and exercise.
  3. Provide engaging play toys: Leave your dog or cat’s favorite toys and anything else you can think of so they can remain entertained in your absence.While treats may not last long in toys, you can also try inserting or freezing them inside a toy to provide a mental challenge. There are also puzzle game treat dispensers on the market that encourage a dog’s natural foraging behavior by stimulating their sense of smell. Dogs learn to lift the compartment covers and rotate the toy to retrieve the hidden treats, keeping them happy and engaged. There are also a bevy of fun and challenging play-alone activity toys for cats available like motorized wands, automatic cat teasers and even a scampering self-correcting mouse that automatically moves to engage natural hunting instincts.
  4. Capitalize on sensory stimulants: Be it an outdoor shady and well-protected space in the yard where your pet can watch birds, squirrels and other wildlife, watching Animal Planet on TV, or seeing or hearing you through a web-connected device at certain times of the day, there are many ways to ensure your pet has entertainment and peace-of-mind while you are away.
  5. Find a furry friend: Many pets enjoy spending time with other animals, whether they be the same breed or type of pet, or not. Many dogs and cats play quite well together. A common solution is to adopt a second pet as a companion for your dog or cat but, if that isn’t a viable solution, pre-arrange pet play dates. Perhaps you have a friend or family member’s pet over one day, and alternate so the other party takes your pet on other days, Of course, take the time to consider how your pet would react to this and what kind of pet is ideal. Optimally, do a test run over multiple hours with you on location to observe the interaction and behaviors before leaving the two animals “home alone” together.

Avoiding, rectifying or reversing a pet’s state of loneliness can have tremendous and immediate benefits for the animal and the household at large.  Following even a few of the tips above will improve a pet’s quality of life and surely get their tail wagging again.

Paul Mann is the Founder and CEO of Fetch! Pet Care—the nation’s largest and most trusted franchisor for professional pet sitting, dog walking, and pet fitness/exercise services—serving thousands of pets and pet parents throughout the United States from coast to coast. He may be reached online at: www.FetchPetCare.com.

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Filed under aromatherapy, dog toys, doggie daycare, dogs, exercise your dog, guest blog, keep pets safe, music for dogs, natural health remedies, pet care, pet sitting, pet travel, Uncategorized, walking the dog

Chewy chewy dog bones

We all know that dogs love to chew on bones (and other items, but we won’t go into that here).  I have given Cici all kinds of chews and bones. I have given her raw bones, frozen, but she would chomp them up and I was always afraid that those large pieces of bones might hurt her. What to do? You gotta give your dog a bone to chew on but you are not supposed to give them cooked bones and raw bones can be hard too. (Pun intended).

 

How about a healthy alternative…  Mercola dental bones

 

 

 

 

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We have long been a fan of Dr. Joseph Mercola online. The info on his website is quite good, alternatively delicious and healing. And his team includes Dr. Karen Becker, a vet. So, we were delighted to receive these dental bones for Cici’s review. And she LOVES them. She gets one per day and drools whenever I take one out to give it to her. And it is good for me because I know that they are great for her teeth. Win-win. All four paws up and two thumbs up !

 

Ingredients include: Organic brown rice powder, Tapioca starch, water, natural chicken flavor, Organic Pea powder, Brewers Dried Yeast, Parsley powder, Peppermint oil, Rosemary Oil and Vitamin E.  Gluten-free.

 

Some info on Dr. Mercola’s website about oral health in dogs:

According to the American Veterinary Dental Society (AVDS), 80% of dogs show oral distress by age 3. It’s one of the most common health issues treated in animal health clinics today.

Dr Becker says in the video that telling you not to brush your dog’s teeth is like telling you to forego brushing and just chew granola. She suggests that our dog’s oral health is VERY important. And that is why it is important to brush your dog’s teeth every day. So these bones are not a substitute for that. (Although I admit am not a big fan of brushing Cici’s teeth).

 

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Here’s a quick checklist to help you start taking better care of your dog’s teeth:

  • Have your dog’s teeth checked and professionally cleaned at your family veterinarian – follow your vet’s advice as far as cleaning regularity
  • Start your dog off with as clean a mouth as possible prior to cleaning or brushing
  • Pickup a soft-bristled tooth brush and toothpaste from your veterinarian – human toothpaste and baking soda may not be good for your dog
  • Brush your dog’s teeth on a daily basis – even with regular brushing, your dog may still need occasional professional cleaning
  • In between brushing, find a healthy and tasty chew bone for your dog.

Avoid dog chews with these ingredients:

Here are some of the not-so-natural ingredients you’ll see listed:

  • Gelatin: A potentially toxic animal by-product, created by boiling down various unused parts of animals such as skin, tendon, bone, cartilage and connective tissue.
  • Hydrogenated Starch Hydrolysate (HSH): Low-carbohydrate artificial sweetener.
  • Soy Protein Isolate: Known allergen, with reduced vitamin, mineral, and protein quality – and increased levels of potential carcinogens.

Mercola Healthy Pets Dog Dental Bones come in two sizes and contain absolutely no corn, soy, gluten, extra fat or sugar, or animal byproducts..

  • Large Size (2.23 oz./63.4g) for dogs 25 pounds and over.
  • Small Size (0.81 oz./22.9g) for dogs from 5 to 25 pounds.

And for puppies, senior dogs and dogs with delicate or missing teeth, Mercola Healthy Pets Gentle Dental Bones (1.43 oz./40.54 g) come in two sizes.

  • Large Size (1.43 oz/40.54g) for adult dogs or puppies 15 pounds and over.
  • Small Size (0.81 oz/22.9g) for adult dogs 5-25 pounds or puppies up to 15 pounds.

 

 

 

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Filed under chew toy, dog friendly, dog health, doggie breath, dogs, eco friendly/green, four paws up, holistic vet, K9 approved, keep pets safe, Made in USA, organic, pet care, product review

Pit Bull Week

Are you following Pit Bull week on HuffPost?  You should be…

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HuffPost Green is launching a week-long, community-driven effort to bust the myths and raise awareness about pit bulls, a maligned “breed” that often bears the brunt of dated, discriminatory legislation that can make it near impossible for these dogs to find a forever home.

You can follow along with HuffPost Pit Bull Week here:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/news/pit-bulls/

 or on Facebook and Twitter where we’ll be using the hashtag #‎PitBullWeek.

Adorable photos of pit bulls

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/07/28/my-pit-bull_n_5625605.html

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Pit bulls have long been popular family pets, noted for their affection and loyalty, but you don’t hear much about gentle, loving pit bulls in the media because a well-behaved dog doesn’t make headlines.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/matt-bershadker/what-puts-pit-bulls-in-pe_b_5626508.html

Pit bull heroes

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/07/29/pit-bulls-heroic-happy-and-good_n_5563496.html

And hopefully, we will have an interview with a very special guest this week, a pit bull named Susie and her mom, Donna. On Sunday August 3, this weekend, a movie about their very amazing life together will be on TV. The movie is called Susie’s Hope.

Stay tuned !!!

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Filed under adoption, animal abuse, canine cuteness, dogs, keep pets safe, pet adoption, pet care, pit bull, publicity

Fighting Over Dogs and Cats

Nowadays, many of us pet parents, consider our fur babies our children. There is nothing wrong with that, in my humble opinion. Except that the law considers them property not kids. Still, issues like divorce bring up similar considerations between spouses, what to do about the fur kids. Who gets to “keep” the fur kids? Will custody be shared? Can one party “keep” the fur baby and how often can the other party visit? Below an attorney, guest blogger, Charla Bradshaw, flushes out the issues more fully.

I don’t wanna get divorced…

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http://www.buzzfeed.com/paws/sad-puppies-that-will-ruin-your-day#

more info:

http://www.womansdivorce.com/pet-custody.html

Consider making up a pre-pup arrangement (like a pre-nup) that spells out what happens to your pets if your marriage splits up.

True Love American Style

  “We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals”

                                -Immanuel Kant

The American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers conducted a poll of 1,500 members and nearly a quarter said they had noticed an increase in custody issues over pets. Courts have had to determine not only who gets the pet but whether one party has the right to see the pet after the marriage breaks up.  Identifying the best interests of the pet in a divorce case can safeguard that the pet is properly cared for after divorce.

Pets can provide unbelievable companionship and unconditional love for adults and children.  Animals such as dogs, cats and horses are considered personal property for divorce purposes and unfortunately can also be the subject of domestic violence.

In a divorce, pets must be awarded as part of the property division and therefore will usually go to one spouse or the other.  However, spouses can choose to co-own the pet going forward and create a visitation schedule for the pet.  We have done these orders and they actually work very well.  We also see pet schedules associated with a child’s visitation schedule where the pet goes with the child.  When spouses co-own a pet, going forward, we must provide provisions for the expenses related to the animal. This can be important when dealing with livestock, such as horses, or an animal that has health issues.

Since pets are considered personal property, there can be disputes over whether the pet is the separate property of one of the spouses or community property.  Separate property can be acquired by a gift, inheritance, or if the property was owned on the date of marriage.  Separate property cannot be divided by a court.  Spouses may argue over whether the pet was a “gift”, or whether the spouses bought the pet together, making the pet community property subject to being awarded to one spouse or the other.

Unfortunately, pets are often targets in family violence but Texas has come to the rescue.  Texas courts can now include pets in protective orders in domestic violence cases. Because pets have suffered abuse when family violence has occurred, in 2011 the Texas legislature amended the law to prohibit the removal of animals from the possession of a person named in the protective order.  In a protective order, the court may prohibit a party from removing a pet, companion animal, or assistance animal, as defined by Section 121.002 of the Human Resources Code, from the possession or actual or constructive care of a person named in the protective order.  The “actual or constructive care” verbiage was added in 2013.  In turn, in 2013, the Texas Penal Code was amended to specify what the possession of a pet, companion animal, or assistance animal by a person actually means.

So what do these protective order laws actually mean for pets?  They mean that a person subject to a protective order that violates a pet provision in the protective order can go to jail, plain and simple.  An abuser will often turn on a pet to cause pain and suffering not only to the pet, but to the perpetrator’s victim(s).  An abuser may also threaten a pet’s life in order to keep their victim(s) close.  As a result, a victim may stay in an abusive situation to keep the companionship of the pet, not realizing the court can make orders with regard to the pet.

One of the problems is that most facilities and shelters for those running from family violence are not equipped to take animals and therefore the animals are left behind. There is a growing need in this regard not only for the safety of the pet but because the unconditional love a pet can give may be lost at the time it is needed the most.

Divorce or abuse can actually take a toll on a pet.  The Humane Society of the United States sets forth the following signs of pet stress:

•    They become depressed

•    They sleep a lot

•    Their appetite lessens

•    They’re not interested in their walks or other daily activities

•    They start to cry or whimper

•    They groom, lick and/or bite themselves excessively

•    They have accidents in the home

The bottom line is that pets are often the subject of divorce and family violence and the laws are improving to protect them.  It is important for everyone to be aware of these laws especially so that abuse victims may realize the court can include a pet in a protective order.  Abuse is bad enough for the lives of those who suffer it, but losing or leaving behind a pet can only make the suffering worse.

Victims asking a court for a protective order should ask the court to make orders regarding their pet(s).  Additionally, spouses in a divorce should be aware that pet(s) are property.  Sadly, a pet may become the subject of a very expensive fight when the real issue is to cause pain to the other spouse.

Charla Bradshaw is an accomplished family law attorney and Denton Managing Shareholder known for successfully summarizing some of the most difficult cases. She was listed among the Top 50 Women Lawyers in Texas (2014) and rated one of the Best Women Lawyers in North Texas by D Magazine. While she employs an aggressive approach to litigating family law cases, Charla Bradshaw is also a certified mediator and handles collaborative law cases.

This is a blog hop post… click on link here

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Filed under adoption, animal abuse, blog hop, cats, dogs, Humane Society, keep pets safe, moms, pet blog hop, pet care, Uncategorized

Ten Tips: When Your Pet is Lost

First thing to do is to PREVENT your dog from getting lost by ensuring that your gate at home is closed or locked and your dog cannot get out of it. When you are traveling, keep your dog on leash with you at all times. 

Prepare ahead of time for the worst case scenario. If your dog has a microchip, make sure that it is registered with the company with your current contact info. Cici’s is with HomeAgain and they also have a service that if she is lost, I can call them and they will send alerts out to all of the locals including neighbors, vets, and SPCA. Plus, if she is found 500 miles away, they will fly her home for free.

Get good dog tags for your pet to wear at all times. And when you are traveling be sure that the contact info is correct.

Now a word here about Pet ID tags. We have tried numerous pet ID tags. By far the BEST ONE we have found is this one…

http://www.1cutepooch.com/

We LOVE the various options, the state driver’s license tag is our favorite. Second is the Hello name tag version. Your dog’s name and contact info and photo is imprinted on the ID tags. And what really set these apart for me (and Cici) is that you can put the tags into a leather pouch that attaches to the harness or collar. It was a little bit hard to open but once done, that was it. With all of Cici’s rolling around on her back,, at home and in the grass, all of the other tags we’ve tried came off within an hour or two. NOT with these tags. She’s worn them now for a few weeks. Imagine my surprise.  The ones below are similar to the ones sent us.

 

 

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Nearly one in five lost pets goes missing after being scared by the sound of fireworks, thunderstorms or other loud noises, according to a survey by The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. And, while losing your pet can be a traumatic experience for both you and your pet, have hope as 93% of dogs and 75% of cats reported lost are returned safely to their homes according to another survey.

If you do lose your pet, here are 10 top tips to help reunite you with your furry friend as quickly as possible:

 

  1. Contact or visit your local shelters and animal control organizations.  File a lost pet report with every shelter, dog pound and animal control office within a 60-mile radius of your home and visit the nearest shelters daily, if possible.
  2. Get the word out to all veterinarians in the area.  Sometimes people pick up a stray and drive it to a distant clinic.
  3. Search your neighborhood.  Walk or drive through your neighborhood several times each day. Enlist friends, family and others to help you.  Ask neighbors, letter carriers, and delivery people if they have seen your pet. Hand out a recent photograph of your pet and information on how you can be reached if your pet is found.
  4. Go door to door and speak with your neighbors.  The more people know you have lost a pet, and that you are upset, worried and desperately trying to find your pet, the more people will call you if they see an animal in the woods or on the road, or in their backyard.
  5. Place posters and flyers throughout the neighborhood.  Post notices at grocery stores, community centers, veterinary offices, traffic intersections, at pet supply stores, and other locations. Also, place advertisements in newspapers and with radio stations. Include your pet’s sex, age, weight, breed, color, and any special markings. To avoid scams, when describing your pet, leave out one identifying characteristic and ask the person who finds your pet to describe it.
  6. Post info about your pet on all pet recovery websites and services.  Sites such as Craigslist.org, TheCenterForLostPets.com and FidoFinder.com allow you to broadcast your missing pet info quickly.  National pet care providers can be hired to assist you in your search for your lost pet.
  7. Consider using a lost pet recovery service.  There are now numerous lost pet alert services, such as FindToto.com, that will contact homes, veterinarians, shelters and animal control organizations for a reasonable fee.
  8. Place food and water outside your home.  Your pet may eventually return to your home when they get hungry or thirsty.  Consider placing the food in a rented or purchased humane pet trap to capture them.
  9. Tell everyone you see about your pet and ask them to keep their eyes open for her.  The more people you alert about your missing pet, the greater the chance someone will recollect seeing your pet in their area.
  10. Don’t give up.  Be aggressive in your search, get lots of help, get the word out right away – don’t wait a few hours “to see if she’ll come home on her own “– you need those early hours to put up posters and start your search.

Paul Mann is the Founder the CEO of Fetch! Pet Care—the nation’s largest and most trusted franchisor for professional pet sitting, dog walking, and pet fitness/exercise services—serving thousands of pets and pet parents throughout the United States from coast to coast. He may be reached online at:www.FetchPetCare.com.

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