Monthly Archives: June 2015

6 Tips for a safe 4th of July

6 Tips to ensure that your pet enjoys the 4th of July festivities 

More pets go missing on the Fourth of July than any other time of the year. Pets and loud noises are not a winning combination. Dr. Carol Osborne, DVM has compiled a list of tips to help take some of the stress out of what is supposed to be a joyous celebration.

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6 Tips for a fun and fearless 4th of July:

  • Be sure your pets have well-fitting collars with up to date tags.
  • Don’t give in to offering your pet a plethora of BBQ treats. Keeping as close to their regular diet as possible will help avoid upset stomachs, vomiting, diarrhea and emergency room issues like pancreatitis.
  • Life jackets help keep water bound canines afloat, as not all dogs are strong swimmers. Never leave your dog alone at the beach and/or on a boat, as they can easily become overpowered by waves, tides and currents.
  • Most dogs and cats DO NOT enjoy fireworks. Pet ears are far more sensitive to loud noises than ours. Classical music has been shown to reduce canine anxiety. Pet thunder shirts are also an option to help comfort stressed dogs.
  • Homeopathic calming remedies including Bach’s Rescue Remedy and Tranquility Blends containing the herb Skull Cap help to safely reduce stress levels for dogs and cats with no adverse effects. Both products may be applied to the inner (hairless) ears, which act as acupressure points in dogs and cats. Both may also be given by mouth.
  • Don’t put human sunscreen on your pet. Pet sunscreen is fine for dogs and cats, but avoid zinc oxide, which is toxic to pets. DEET, a common insecticide, is also poisonous to pets and may cause neurological signs, including drooling, vomiting, diarrhea, excessive thirst and lethargy.

Dr. Carol Osborne, DVM.

Integrative Veterinarian

Dr. Carol Osborne is an author and world-renowned integrative veterinarian of twenty plus years. A pioneer in anti-aging medicine and longevity research for pets, she created and patented the original PAAWS: Pet Anti-Aging Wellness System for dogs and cats. Dr. Carol holds both the dog and cat scientific patents.


After graduating from the Ohio State College of Veterinary Medicine, Dr. Carol completed a prestigious internship at the Columbus Zoo.  Shortly afterwards, she launched a very successful private practice and became founder and director of the non-profit organization, the American Pet Institute. Dr. Carol offers traditional veterinary care for dogs and cats with a softer, natural touch. Her approach highlights the importance of nutrition and utilizing holistic avenues in combination with traditional treatments.

Official web site: http://chagrinfallspetclinic.com

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Filed under dogs, keep pets safe, Uncategorized

How to Blog like a Dog

Ever notice how people online LOVE to watch cute doggie and cat videos?  Dogs are experts at getting the attention they want with a wiggly butt, big smile, tickling toes with a lick, and they go for what they want by focusing in on the people passing by one at a time. If Cici sees someone she wants to say hello to, they do not have a chance at escaping her charm. She demands, usually with a bark, that they come over and meet her. What do dogs want? Butt scratches, belly rubs, attention and lots of treats. Some also like to cuddle and play fetch.

How does this translate into blogging like a dog?

Make it visually appealing

A dog is physically pleasing, entertaining and adorable, right. Is your blog? How does it look / stand out from the crowd?

More on design here:  http://www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/there-are-no-rules/design-readable-blog-posts

Sit, stay, Shake.

Dogs charm their audience with their funny antics. Cici rolls over on her back and shows off her belly which makes people laugh. Your blog should do the same, entertain, make people laugh and come closer for more info. The unique news should be valuable to your readers and make readers want more and encourage, inspire, enlighten and uplift.

Heads Up.

Your headline and first sentence and paragraph should capture people’s attention the same way that a dog motivates people with their goofy antics.

And the rest of your blog post should continue the story with interesting quotes, stats and photos.

Dish it good.

No one wants to know what mundane things you are doing daily such as what you ate for breakfast. That is, unless you are writing about the fabulous brunch you and your French poodle ate at that nouveau luxurious B&B that caters to poodles.

Mark your Territory.

Be clear and stick to the point. No one wants to watch a dog who is all over the place (you know those energizer bunny type dogs). It’s too confusing and requires too much energy.

Gimme a treat.

Ask yourself, “Why should readers care about your blog?”  What’s in it for them? If they are going to spend a few minutes reading, there has got to be something that they get out of it.  Figure out the who, what, when, where and why; and ask yourself if you would find it compelling or at least worth your time.

Express yourself.

Get to the point in a few sentences. Don’t use jargon that only a rare few will know what you are talking about. Communicate as simply and clearly as possible with a few simple words. Relate to your audience like a dog on a mission to get a bone or treat.

Frill me baby. 

Don’t be afraid to show off your personality, authenticity and sense of humor.  Just as Cici is not reticent about showing off her spots, flaunt what you got with a bit of sass and flair.

Ready to play blog ball?

dog car  steering wheel

dog car steering wheel

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Take Your Dog to Work

Friday, June 26 is Take Your Dog to Work Day.  As fun as this may sound to some pet owners, others won’t be as enthused when Rover gives them wet kisses or chews on some important files.  

“It’s an etiquette nightmare waiting to happen,” says Jacqueline Whitmore, an etiquette expert, author and founder of The Protocol School of Palm Beach.  

Whitmore offers these seven ‘petiquette’ tips:

–       Practice makes perfect. Make sure your dog can interact politely and adapt well to unfamiliar surroundings before you take him to the office so that he can put his best paw forward.

–       Be respectful of others. Don’t be surprised if some of your co-workers are allergic or uncomfortable around dogs. Honor their wishes and refrain from introducing your dog to them.

–       Don’t allow your dog to wander. Teach your dog to lie down quietly under your desk or at your feet while you work. Keep your dog off the office furniture and don’t allow your dog to jump on people whenever they greet him. An ill-mannered dog can be a nuisance and may not be invited back to the office.

–       Proceed with caution. Just like people, some dogs are shy and introverted. So don’t assume all dogs want to meet your dog. Allow the other dogs some time to get to know your dog before you let them play together.

–       Ask permission. Even friendly dogs can get excited and play too rough if not carefully supervised. Use your best judgment before you introduce your dog to a new dog. It’s never hurts to ask, “Is your dog friendly?” 

–       Try not to leave your dog alone for a long period of time. It’s a moot point to take your dog to work if you have to be in meetings all day. Make sure you have plenty of quality time to spend with him. 

–       Give your dog a break. Even dogs get bored if they are inactive for too long. Be sure to pack plenty of toys for him to play with. Also take your dog outside for a couple of walks during the day. The sunshine and fresh air will be good for both of you.

http://www.etiquetteexpert.com/

http://jacquelinewhitmore.com/

Doggies on the Job by Peter Nash

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https://styleblueprint.com/nashville/everyday/peter-nash-portrait-photographer-extraordinare/

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66% of workers said that they were willing to take a cut in pay to bring their dogs to work. 95% of people said they would be less stressed and 94% said they would be happier and more productive if they had their dogs at work. An astonishing 91% replied that having their dogs at work would make them get along with their co-workers better.All of this is surprising given that only 24% of American workers are allowed to bring their dog to work and the most successful companies like Google, Ben & Jerry’s and Amazon continue to be voted best to work at year after year partially because of their dog friendly work environments.

http://3milliondogs.com/news/new-survey-shows-americans-really-want-to-bring-their-dogs-to-work?utm_source=3MD&utm_medium=Email&utm_content=66_percentage_willing_take_pay_cut&utm_campaign=3MD_newsletter_june23

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