Category Archives: vet

Happy Take Your Pooch to Work Day

June 20 is Take Your Dog to Work Day…   how are you celebrating?

 

here are some ideas:

 

http://www.takeyourdog.com/Get-Involved/10-ways-to-celebrate.php

 

Some lucky doggies go to work EVERY Day…

 

Screen shot 2014-06-19 at 11.18.54 AM   http://www.dogsforheroes.org/   http://www.pinterest.com/stubbydog/pit-bulls-are-therapy-dogs/   and some lucky humans gets to work with dogs (and other animals) Every day…   here are some of their jobs/businesses:

Advocate for animals

Animal boarding facility

Animal Communicator

Animal control officer

Animal sanctuary (Best Friends, VillaLobos)

Artist, pet portraits

Author of pet books

Cat/canine coffee house owner

Dog trainer

Dog food cook

Dog treat baker

Dog food truck (ie, Phydough)

Dog bakery owner or employee

Doggie daycare owner or employee

Doggie groomer

Dog hydrotherapist, acupuncturist, canine massage therapist

Farmer

Filmmaker of pet movies

Guide dog trainer

Jewelry maker of pet items

Pet camp owner

Pet fashion (clothing designer, sales)

Pet friendly innkeeper

Pet toymaker

Pet food retail shop owner

Pet photographer

Pet Public Relations/Marketing/Social Media

Pet product manufacturer (i.e., collars, leashes, harnesses, food, shampoo)

Pet sitter

Pet transporter/taxi

Pet travel specialist

Pet Travel writer

Pet writer

Property management (pet friendly properties)

Realtor (pet friendly homes)

Train dog models, dog actors

T-shirts, clothing related to pets

Veterinarian

Vet technician

Website designer (for pet related products, group, rescues, etc)

  Do you work with animals?   shampoo-conditioner-3

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Filed under adoption, animal communication, animal rescue, animal stars, animals, dog rescue, dog training, dog wear, doggie camp, doggie daycare, dogs, keep pets safe, pet sitting, pet travel, pit bull, Uncategorized, vet

Cici’s recovery

Cici’s surgery and vet care was completely unexpected and a very large expense for my very fixed and tiny income.  Most of it has been paid but there is still about $350 left on the bill that I frankly need assistance with.

Here’s why she needed surgery:

https://celiasue.com/2014/04/18/fleas-fox-tails-and-allergies-oh-my/

Koda’s Legacy put up a chipin for us so that people can donate directly to the vet hospital. I would very much appreciate it if you can donate a few bucks and/or share with others so that Cici can continue to get the vet care that she needs.

Here’s the link: http://www.youcaring.com/medical-fundraiser/cici-s-surgery/171531

thank you.

my poor little conehead is getting used to the cone AND still smashing into everything

Photo on 2014-04-18 at 08.07

OK, at first, initially Cici was eating well and everything was going smoothly after her ear surgery for the hematoma. But then, last Wed. morning, she threw up three times. And afterwards, I noticed she was also constipated. She kept down her breakfast but not her lunch.

I knew immediately the side effects of the drugs she was taking (an antibiotic and a steroid) and I stopped giving them to her. Did not ask the vet. I knew that i could not give her anymore drugs without food in her belly.

Then I checked her gums to make sure that they were not gray but healthy pink and kept her hydrated, full of water. Did not feed her anymore that day. I googled natural remedies for vomiting and constipation.

Then Thursday morning, she threw up again a tiny bit, there was not much left in her tummy. She went outside and did her business. And then she did not want to eat anymore at all the entire day and evening. I was OK with that because I figured that it would pass.

I had to call the vet for another reason and mentioned what was happening. The vet was not available but I kept on giving Cici lots of water and offering her food from time to time. No food, lots of water. To me, it was a good sign that she was drinking the water.

Finally, at 3 am, Cici decided to start eating again and i gave her a tiny meal of kibble, water and hot dogs, not the healthiest but what I could throw together. Friday morning, I gave her pumpkin and baby food, good for her belly.

The vet tech left a message that i should stop the pills and also to bring her into the office for her drain removal. This seemed earlier than i expected but i took her in. Do not know if the drain being in her ear was affecting her tummy upset but her ear looks good, like it is healing and the sutures will come out next.  I also asked them to look at her anALS and they expressed them.

Although I felt sad and nauseous at times myself, I tried not to panic throughout this ordeal. And i think that served Cici well. I comforted her and kept her hydrated when that was all I could do for her. And I prayed for her tummy upset to be over soon.

I think it is important for pet guardians to keep a cool head, to learn the side effects of the medications their pets are taking and to have and implement a reasonable plan of action. Rushing Cici to the vet would not have helped her. Getting her there when I did made a lot more sense.

Have you ever had problems with your dog’s digestion and what did you do about it?

This is a Blog Hop via Fidose of Reality

http://fidoseofreality.com/pet-bloggers-bookmark-now/

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eat spray lick

took Cici to the vet this week. she has lost 12-14 pounds… she had fleas (do not see anymore, thankfully), she may have worms, and she has a terrible skin infection. Without her cone on her head, I have to be REALLY vigilant, or she will make a bloody mess of her rear end in under two minutes.

Questions I have not yet asked the vet (we go back for a follow-up in two weeks)… did the fleas drink 12-14 pounds of her blood or did the worms eat up all of her food (because I was feeding her twice as much as normal and she kept dropping weight)… is she EVER going to stop scratching, itching and chewing on herself????

Lessons learned again:  even when you want to do the best thing, all natural remedies and treatments need to be advised by and / or treated by a knowledgeable pet expert / holistic vet.  I learned that Cici cannot tolerate essential oils (she gets rashes) and some recommended home remedies do NOT work to relieve itching or fleas. I found out that grains and coconut oil, for instance, sweetens the blood and attracts fleas. I stopped giving it to her immediately.  gave her a nice grass fed beef broth made with parsley, a clove of garlic and water, for two days…

the vet techs gave her a medicated bath and I gave her one too at their instructions and she is still itchy…  she was given confortis for the fleas, a de-wormer pill, and is on antibiotics twice a day (hidden in hot dogs)… she is eating a grain free diet for the next couple of weeks (rabbit, turkey burgers, and meat meat meat), not prescribed by the vet… but hoping to hulk her up.

also hope to strengthen her immune system so that she can get her weight back.  have found a way to give Cici ASEA every day, add some raw meat or butter to it and she licks it right up… since I have been giving this to her, she does not seem as scrawny, bones do not seem to be protruding as much. I spray it on her itchy spots and when she chews on herself to alleviate the itch and the spray works really well…

ASEA helps cells work more efficiently and empowers the body to repair itself. It also increases cellular efficiency and intercellular communications… amazing molecules

I also hope to be able to get these products for Cici that were recommended by Pet communication expert Kate Solisti…

the company that offers these products is earthanimals.com 

HERBAL INTERNAL POWDER (Yeast Free): Formulated by Dr. Bob Goldstein

Ingredients: Alfalfa Powder, Garlic Powder, Blue-Green Algae (Spirulina), Kelp Powder, Papaya Leaf, Nettles Leaf, Hawthorne Berry Powder.

Herbal Internal Powder is a culmination of organic herbs for flea and tick prevention, it is “yeast free” for dogs and cats that can be sensitive to yeast. It contains, the highest quality ingredients rich in minerals that will help cleanse and purify the blood, support circulation, help deter fleas, ticks,  mosquitoes and black flies. Taken regularly, the Herbal Internal Powder makes your animal less attractive to infestation.

By simply adding the powder to your animals daily diet, the combination of the minerals and herbs, helps to change the odor of the dog and cats blood chemistry, so that fleas, ticks, mosquitoes, and black flies do not like the odor or taste of the blood. The odor is undetectable by humans and is loathed by bugs, therefore they do not like to imbed or go on the animal at all! At the same time, building their immune system. We believe the healthier the animal the less likely for any infestations. It works! Over 20 years of proven testimonials!

No More Flea Drops

An organic, herbal remedy designed to help alter the chemistry of your dog or cats blood scent, so the scent of the body is loathed by fleas. It helps assist the dog or cat in his/her defense against flea infestations and flea bite dermatitis.  We suggest adding the drops over and above The Herbal Internal Powder or Internal Powder.  The drops, in liquid form have a high absorption benefit and will enhance the powder for ultimate prevention from fleas.

Ingredients: Garlic, Wormwood, Yellow Dock, Alfalfa, Nettles, and Kelp.

has your dog ever lost weight? had a bad skin infection?  had worms?   what did you do to fatten them up again?  stop them from itching?

have you ever tried sleeping with a conehead?  either the cone winds up on my legs or on my head…

Find the coneless dog head…

Photo on 2013-08-16 at 10.28

oh there it is, with dog bed ear (humans get bed head, apparently dogs get bed ears)…

Photo on 2013-08-16 at 10.56 #2

contemplating her bath today / wondering who to call to get her out of it…

Photo on 2013-08-16 at 11.02

alas, she had her bath and is now conehead once again…

Photo on 2013-08-02 at 08.53

Blog Hop time…thanks to Life with DogsTwo Little Cavaliers and Confessions of the Plume…  grab the blog hop  link

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Pet food recalls

Recent Dog Food Recalls

Just expanded to Louisiana

http://www.klfy.com/story/18224646/pet-food-recall-expands-includes-louisiana

Brands included in the recall are: (see below)*

Kirkland Signature products 

Natural Balance
– Canidae
– Chicken Soup For the Pet Lover’s Soul
– Country Value
– Diamond
– Diamond Naturals
– Premium Edge
– Professional
– 4Health
– Taste Of The Wild
– Wellness
– Apex
– Kaytee Fort-Diets

Solid Gold

http://www.solidgoldhealth.com/news.php

Ingredients

Beef meal, cracked pearled barley, ground rice, peas, egg product, rice bran, chicken fat (preserved with mixed tocopherols), fish meal, dried plain beet pulp, pea protein, millet, flaxseed, natural flavor, potassium chloride, salt, choline chloride, vitamin E supplement, iron proteinate, zinc proteinate, copper proteinate, ferrous sulfate, zinc sulfate, copper sulfate, potassium iodide, thiamine mononitrate, manganese proteinate, manganous oxide, ascorbic acid, vitamin A supplement, biotin, niacin, calcium pantothenate, manganese sulfate, sodium selenite, pyridoxine hydrochloride (vitamin B6), vitamin B12 supplement, riboflavin, vitamin D supplement, folic acid.

http://www.diamondpet.com/information/

Pet owners who are unsure if the product they purchased is included in the recall, or who would like replacement product or a refund, may contact Natural Balance Pet Foods Customer Service at (800) 829-4493 (8am – 5pm, PST). Consumers may also go to www.naturalbalanceinc.com for more information.


this is a people problem… the people who manufacture pet food should be held accountable…

“…The individuals became ill either through handling the tainted kibble or having contact with a dog that had eaten it. The outbreak has now spread across (more than) nine states…” (Alabama, Arkansas, Colorado, Connecticut, DC, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Maryland, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Mississippi, North Carolina, North Dakota, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, Vermont, Wisconsin, West Virginia, Wyoming and Canada).

“Although Diamond has claimed no dog illnesses have been linked to the outbreak, Food Safety News reports the claim may be leaving some pet owners with a false sense of security because state and federal agencies don’t track pet illnesses. So although no dog illnesses have been reported, that doesn’t mean no dog illnesses have occurred, it says.

“…Pets with Salmonella infections may have decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain, according to the FDA. If left untreated, pets may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever and vomiting. Infected but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans.”

Contact your vet if your pet has these symptoms. 

http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/tailsofseattle/2018161654_pet-food_recall_expanded.html

*For the entire list of pet foods recalled, check out Two Little Cavaliers excellent blog post.

“…People infected with Salmonella should watch for nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal cramping, and fever. Diamond Pet Foods is working with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC), which has received a limited number of reports of salmonellosis, the illness caused by Salmonella.”

http://twolittlecavaliers.com/2012/05/more-dog-food-recall-2012.html

If you are not sure if your pet’s food has been recalled, check the production codes on the back of the bag, check on the company website and/or call the company.

Don’t know what to feed your pet? Fresh, homemade dog food is the best way to go. And one way to make sure your pet has all the nutritious ingredients they need, we recommend Dr. Harvey’s Canine Health.

THE RECIPE:

1. Add Canine Health to boiling water.

2. Simmer for 8 minutes.

3. Let cool.

4. Add your choice of protein. (beef, chicken, turkey, soy, lentils, etc.)

5. Add your choice of oil. (Health and Shine, flax, borage, olive, hemp)

6. Watch a happy and healthy dog eat.

*Detailed instructions are included in every bag of Canine Health.

Compare this list with the list on your pet’s food…

INGREDIENTS:  (no wheat, corn, soy, natural flavor, ingredients that you cannot pronounce)  

Organic Brown Rice Flakes, Organic Kamut Flakes, Organic Spelt Flakes, Organic Rolled Oats, Organic Barley Flakes, Organic Triticale Flakes, Sweet Potatoes*, Carrots*, Potatoes*, Zucchini*, Peas**, Green Beans*, Beets*, Broccoli*, Parsley Leaf, Lecithin Granules, Garlic Granules, Bee Pollen Granules, Nutritional Yeast Flakes, Alfalfa Leaf, Rose Hips*, Red Clover Blossums*, Oat Straw*, Flax Seed Meal*, Papaya Leaf*, Rosemary Leaf*, Dandelion Root*, Peppermint Leaf*, Ginger Root*, Spirulina*, Foenugreek*, Basil Leaf, Fennel Seed.

*Dehydrated **Freeze Dried

https://celiasue.com/2012/03/26/top-10-reasons-to-feed-your-dog-fresh-whole-food/

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Filed under dog health, dogs, healthy dog food, homemade dog food, pet care, pet food, toxic pet food, Uncategorized, vet

Top 10 Most Expensive Pets

interesting stats…we love our pets and they  can be costly. Food, toys, treats, and health care add up. Do you have pet insurance for your pets?

http://www.petinsurancecomparison.net/top-10-most-expensive-pets/

1. Rottweiler

2. Bernese Mountain

3. Siamese

4. Great Dane

5. English Bulldog

6. Bengal

7. French Bulldog

8. Maine Coone

9. Ragdoll

10. Himalayan

 Pet Insurance

  • Without insurance, vet bills can skyrocket—and we’re less likely to foot the bill the higher costs go (check statistics in the infographic per dog and cat).

  • An average of 27% of pet owners feel pet insurance is a good way to save money (It could cover up to 90% of a vet bill).

  • Only 3% of dogs are insured and 1% of cats. Less than 1% of all pets are so dogs and cats are among the most commonly insured pets.

  • Also there are 11 major pet insurance providers in America.

  • There are 78 million dogs and 86.4 million cats in America.

  • By 2011 an estimate of $50.84 billion were spent on pet expenses and $25.51 billion on medical costs!

  • There is more than 1 pet per 2 people!

     

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Filed under cats, dogs, pet insurance, Uncategorized, vet

Confessions of a Knee Jerk

this thurs. i took cici to the vet… she has been hopping for two weeks now.  i was hoping that he’d tell me it was nothing to worry about…  just a little strain or something.

i was wrong.

people have called me a knee jerk liberal, baby boomer, hippie and God knows what else, but now I guess I am not alone in my knee jerk reaction (sorry, for the bad jokes)…

Cici tore a ligament and will need surgery.  She also has arthritis. I asked if she could have caught my arthritis and he said no. she is still young, only five and a half. I thought that dogs don’t get conditions like this until they are 12+ when they are seniors.  Wrong again.

it is not related to the car accident/surgeries she had 4 years ago. Her femur bone has healed beautifully he said.

been crying for two days. upset because I thought she needed more exercise and I’ve been making her situation worse.  plus letting her hop up and down onto chairs and the bed. i now have her confined with a tether and she has a cushion on the floor to lie upon. no more hopping.  take her to our park twice a day but no more long walks.

So now I really feel like a knee jerk…

apparently, this happens mostly to larger dogs and is very common.

it is called cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) damage or rupture.

http://vavetspecialists.com/surgical-services/common-orthopedic-conditions-procedures/cranial-criciate-ligament-injury/

Types of surgery

Tibial Plateau leveling Osteotomy (TPLO); Tibial Tuberosity Advancement (TTA); extracapsular stabilization; and the tight rope procedure

It is reported that dogs who experience a CCL injury in one stifle have a 50% chance of tearing the CCL ligament in their other knee.

http://www.petmd.com/dog/conditions/musculoskeletal/c_dg_cranial_cruciate_ligament#.TyQ24xW-ZFc

Causes

What is currently known is that all breeds are susceptible. Specifically, the incidence of cranial cruciate ligament disease increases for rottweilers and Labrador retrievers younger than four years of age, dogs older than five years of age, and in large-breed dogs from one to two years of age. The predominant gender this affects is the spayed female.

The causes for cranial cruciate ligament disease are most frequently caused by repetitive micro-injury to the cranial cruciate ligament, that is, putting pressure on the ligament in the same way, repeatedly. This action causes slight stretching of the ligament each time, altering the structure, and eventually causing the ligament to tear.

Some of the incidents which may bring about deterioration of the cruciate are injury to the stifle joint; a history of athletics, where repetitive movement can cause stress to the ligaments; a specific traumatic event, as from jumping badly, or any accident that causes the ligament to tear; a knee injury, such as dislocation of the kneecap (medically referred to as patellar luxation).

cost of surgery is quite expensive… and do not know how I will be able to pay for it.

most pet insurance exclusions are like this…

During the first 12 calendar months in which your policy is in effect, no coverage will be extended for the diagnosis, medical management, or surgical correction of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) or cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) damage or rupture. During the first six calendar months in which your policy is in effect, no coverage will be extended for the diagnosis, medical management, or surgical correction of intervertebral disc(s), regardless of the procuring cause.

alternative treatments…

this article has an amazing plethora of info on alternative supplements for arthritis

http://www.whole-dog-journal.com/issues/10_3/features/Canine-Arthritis_15910-1.html

A good arthritis supplement

http://www.jointaid4dogs.com/dogs/home.html

an expensive brace (about $500)

http://www.woundwear.com/product3.cfm

info about various ways to deal without having surgery

http://dogkneeinjury.com/conservative-management-cm/

my plan/protocol is this:

keep her real quiet for 4-8 weeks and confined

give her the joint aid (just ordered it) plus am giving her:

spirugreen

http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/spirugreen.aspx

  • Brain and cognitive function
  • Eye and retinal health
  • Heart and vascular health
  • Immune system function
  • inflammation management
  • Cell division and growth
  • Skin and coat health
  • Movement and flexibility
  • Central nervous system function

wild alaskan salmon oil (just ordered) for the Omega 3’s

may or may not give her yucca stalk by nature’s way, there are mixed reviews

the above is based upon what was said on the conservative management site…(below)

Weight Management … despite her being a cookie monster, this is not a factor for Cici. her weight has been maintained at 53 pounds for a few years now…

Inflammation – We started with Rimadyl and Omega 3 Fish Oil (1000 mg capsules, twice per day). After 1 month of the Rimadyl I transitioned to Yucca Intensive, and give 9-10 drops diluted in food.

Joint Support – Glucosamine and Chondrointin supplements are good to support joint health in any dog.

Rest – Make sure your dog stays in a confined area without distraction. Carpets are preferable, avoid steps, jumping, running or rough play during this time. Toys such as frozen kongs filled with peanut butter or bully sticks are a good way to help them alleviate boredom.

Controlled Exercise – Take a few, short, leash walks per day under controlled conditions to ensure your dog maintains muscle, and to also encourage the growth of scar tissue around the injured ligament.

Pay Attention to Your Dog – Your best friend will tell you how they’re doing. Go at their pace, and avoid doing too much, too soon!

no more hopping for Cici…

http://www.squidoo.com/bunny-ears-for-dogs

http://www.dailydawdle.com/2011/07/just-dog-jumping-on-trampoline-gif.html

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Filed under dog health, doggie healing center, dogs, holistic vet, keep pets safe, organic, pet care, pet insurance, pit bull, Uncategorized, vet

Season’s Eatings

 Veterinarian Reveals How to Avoid Dangerous Trend Among Pet Owners

Do we pay the mortgage or surgery for the dog?

That’s the question a lot of pet owners face in this challenging economic landscape, and unfortunately, it’s a question that’s coming up a lot more often.

“The same thing that is happening to people who can’t afford healthcare is happening to pets, only with pets it’s worse,” said veterinarian Lori Pasternak, of Helping Hands Affordable Veterinary Surgery and Dental Care (www.helpinghandsvetva.com). “When people can’t afford healthcare, they self-treat their colds and flus and ignore serious symptoms until they eventually land in the emergency room. With pets, the same takes place, but in many cases, it leads to the pet winding up needing expensive treatments or surgical procedures that the owners cannot afford. The result is that they end up allowing the pet to be euthanized, simply because they cannot afford the much needed treatment. What’s even more tragic is that it can be avoided with a few simple and affordable steps.”

Pasternak – whose affordable surgical and dental practice works out creative methods of payment to help pet owners avoid making that tragic choice – wants pet owners to consider the same kind of preventative medical visits that their own doctors recommend for them.

Her tips include:

• Pet Healthcare Plans – Many pet clinics and veterinarians offer some variation of a pet healthcare plan in which the owner pays a nominal monthly fee of $20 to $30, which entitles them to a number of free check-ups and wellness visits for their pets. Some plans even include a limited selection of prescriptions and diagnostic tests in that plan, or they discount them deeply. Routine checkups can catch some serious illnesses before they become serious, and prevent a situation in which the treatment is not affordable.

• Preventative Dental Cleanings – The most common way for dogs to get infections is through their mouths, so keeping their teeth and mouth clean is a great way to prevent disease. Keep in mind, one of the most expensive procedures for dogs is dental work. What’s worse, because your pet doesn’t know how to complain, you won’t know how bad its teeth are until after your dog stops eating. Just because they are eating does not mean they don’t have tooth pain. They will eat until they cannot stand it anymore. Then it may be too late. Routine dental cleanings will go a long way to improve your pet’s health. Most infections are introduced through the mouth, so keeping the mouth healthy will help keep your pet healthy.

• Pet Your Pet – Pet and rub your pet often and all over. Not only will they enjoy the attention, but it will enable you to easily determine if they have any bumps or lumps that could be indicators of infection or disease. These growths are much easier and less costly to remove if taken off when smaller than a quarter, so actually petting your pet can help your ability to detect these anomalies early.

“Being a pet owner is not only a joy, but it’s also a responsibility,” Pasternak added. “They depend on us for everything and ask for nothing in return but our love and attention. The best part is that keeping them healthy is a lot easier and affordable than allowing them to get sick. Our goal is to eliminate economic euthanasia and we hope that every pet owner can help us accomplish that by doing their small share in helping all our pets live longer and healthier lives.”

She also has tips for the holidays, ways to keep our pets safe.

“The holidays are supposed to be a time of joy for our families, but in preparing for the season, many pet owners run the risk of exposing their pets to household dangers that could present potential life-threatening hazards to their pets,” said  Pasternak. “These latent hazards could derail a family’s holiday season if their pets become ill as a result of these hidden perils.”

Pasternak’s list of prospective risks include:

• Decorations – While holiday decorations can make a home feel more festive, they can be tantalizing traps for pets. Pet owners should keep decorations and ornaments higher up on trees so they are not consumed by pets. If a pet decides the colorful garland or tree trim might make a tasty snack, they can and will get stuck in your pet’ intestines, necessitating immediate surgical removal. Moreover, exposed cords from electric lights can cause electrocution or oral burns if chewed.

• Gift Wrap – When it’s time to pull all the gifts out of hiding to be wrapped, take care that your pet isn’t in the room as you spread out all the wrapping paper, bows and ribbons. If a cat should starting gnawing on the ribbon, it will literally “stitch” the cat’s intestines together as it is being passed through the gut. Surgery is one holiday gift you don’t want to give your family pet.

• Holiday Feast – While turkey and ham make up the majority of traditional holiday meals, turkey and ham bones can become lodged in the intestines if swallowed in large pieces. Be careful that your guests don’t give in to the holiday spirit too much and choose this time to offer table scraps to your pets. Your pet could become seriously ill or even choke to death.

• Flowers – The poinsettias many choose to use as holiday centerpieces are also toxic to most household pets if they are chewed and swallowed in large enough quantities. The level of toxicity is completely proportionate to the size and weight of your pet, but instead of doing the math on that equation, it’s better to choose other types of floral arrangements that don’t endanger your pets.

“The holidays should be a time for fun, not an unscheduled trip to the animal hospital,” Pasternak added. “If something does happen, don’t hesitate to take your pet to the nearest animal hospital, and know that if you come to ours, we work with our pet owners on affordable payment structures in emergency cases. But we’d rather not see you this season. The best holiday gift you could give your pet is a hazard-free household so they can enjoy the warmth and joy of your celebrations safely and soundly.”

About Lori Pasternak

Lori Pasternak, DVM, graduated from Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine in 1998. She worked in a full-service practice in Richmond, VA for 13 years prior to opening Helping Hands Affordable Veterinary Surgery and Dental Care, where her mission is to help pet owners avoid economic euthanasia by offering “bare bones” fees for services and accepting creative forms of payment.

 

 

 

http://www.wikifido.com/page/Dog+Holiday+Photo+Contest

Fa la la la la la la la…

 

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Filed under all you need is a dog, belly rubs, dog treats, dogs, economy, guest blog, happy holidays, Happy Thanksgiving, holiday tips, holistic vet, keep pets safe, natural health remedies, pet care, stuffing, toxic food for pets, turkey, Uncategorized, vet