Tag Archives: dog bites

Happy Dog Bite Prevention Week

The quiz was compiled by Dog Bite Prevention Coalition members — the Postal Service, American Veterinary Medical Assn., American Humane, Insurance Information Institute and State Farm Insurance.

cicibug

Dog Safety Quiz

1. Is it okay to open a door and let dogs out when a letter carrier drops off mail? Yes OR No

Answer: NO
If a letter carrier delivers mail or packages to your front door, place your dog into a separate room and close the door before opening the front door. Dog owners should remind their children about the need to keep the family dog secured. Parents should remind their children not to take mail directly from letter carriers in the presence of the family pet as the dog may see handing mail to a child as a threatening gesture.

2. Does an angry dog wag his tail? Yes OR No

Answer: YES
People often assume that a dog with a wagging tail is a friendly dog, but this is far from the truth. Dogs wag their tails for numerous reasons, including when they’re feeling aggressive. A tail that is held high and moves stiffly is a sign that the dog is feeling dominant, aggressive, or angry.

3. Do dogs like to be kissed and hugged? Yes OR No

Answer: NO
We humans like to touch and hug people and things when we express happiness. Dogs don’t. Some dogs are very tolerant and will allow hugging and kissing while some try to get away. A dog may tolerate or even enjoy a hug on his terms, but sometimes he will not be in the mood. Think about it, when hugging a person you wrap your arms around the other and hold them in place for a few seconds. That alone is bad news to a dog since they on average do not do well with restrain. They generally don’t like to be held in place. This alone is enough to generate feelings of anxiety as well as a sense of unease and insecurity in your dog.

4. If you know a dog, is it okay to reach through a car window or a fence to pet it? Yes OR No

Answer: NO
Dogs, even ones you know have good days and bad days. You should never pet a dog without asking the owner first and especially if it is through a window or fence. For a dog, this makes them feel like you are intruding on their space and could result in the dog biting you.

5. If a dog is chasing you, should you try to run away? Yes OR No

Answer: NO
Never run from a dog! The dog may think you are playing a game and start chasing you if you begin to run away. Don’t shout or wave your arms as this will either encourage or frighten the dog. Remain calm and still and talk to the dog using a soft voice. Loud, angry-sounding words and screaming only make the dog nervous and upset.

6. Is it important to ask an owner for permission before you pet their dog? Yes OR No

Answer: YES
ALWAYS even if it is a dog you know!
 First get the “OK” from the owner.
 Hold out your hand, fingers closed, palm down, slowly toward the dog. Allow the dog to approach your hand and sniff it.

 Wait for the dog’s “OK.” If he wants your affection, he will lower his head, perk ears, or even come closer to you. If the dogs puts his ears back, flat on his head, or growls, or cowers, don’t pet him!
 Pat the dog on the top of his head, or along his back. Avoid touching his belly, tail, ears, or feet.

7. Is it okay to pet a dog while it is eating? Yes OR No

Answer: NO
Do not try to take food or toy away from a dog. NEVER bother a dog while he is eating. The most common situation where a dog bite occurs is while a dog is eating because they are protecting their source of food.

8. Is it okay to hit or yell at your dog if it doesn’t listen to you? Yes OR No

Answer: NO
When we hit or yell at a dog, we are applying pain and scaring the dog. For dogs, a natural reaction to being hurt or frightened is to bite. A fearful dog doesn’t trust people and can lead to aggression.

9. Is a scared dog as dangerous as an angry dog? Yes OR No

Answer: YES
When animals and people are afraid of something, they prefer to get away from that thing. They try to defend themselves from the scary thing. An angry dog is just as dangerous as a dog that is afraid because both will be defensive and bite.

10. Are there only certain breeds (or types) of dogs that bite? Yes OR No

Answer: NO
ALL DOGS are capable of biting. There’s no one breed or type of dog that’s more likely to bite than others. Biting has more to do with circumstances, behavior, and training.

11. Do dogs use their body to tell you how they feel? Yes OR No

Answer: YES
Dogs have a language that allows them to communicate their emotional state and their intentions to others around them. Although dogs do use sounds and signals, much of the information that they send is through their body language, specifically their facial expressions and body postures. You can tell how a dog is feeling (sad, tired, happy, angry, scared) by looking at the position of a dogs’ ears, mouth, eyes, and tail.

12. Does a good dog owner leave his dog chained up outside all day? Yes OR No

Answer: NO
Dogs are social animals who crave human companionship. That’s why they thrive and behave better when living indoors with their pack — their human family members. Dogs that are tied up or chained outside are frustrated and can become aggressive because they are unhappy. They can also become very afraid because when they are tied or chained up, they can’t escape from things that scare them.

 

*****

Because of Breed Specific Ban Laws in the UK Sir Patrick Stewart known for his role on Star Trek cannot adopt a sweet adorable dog named Ginger who needs a home.  He and the dog bonded when he fostered her in the USA. Yeah she looks very dangerous, kissing and slobbering all over his face.

 

Patrick-Stewart-dog-790551

http://www.express.co.uk/celebrity-news/790551/Dangerous-Dogs-Act-Patrick-Stewart-RSPCA-prevent-adoption-PITBULL

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Filed under animals, dog friendly, dog kisses, dog quiz, dog speak, dog travel, dogs, pit bull, Uncategorized

Mean dogs and “locking jaws”

I had started this blog post before two things happened. Yesterday, my dog went missing for five hours. And an article in Newsweek about pit bulls.

Because my dog is a pit bull mix and I know that some people hate blocky headed bully dogs, besides becoming frantic and worried and searching all over tarnation for her, I had the additional concerns that she could have been hurt, abused, shot on sight, and / or killed in a shelter because of the way she looks. She may or may not even be part American Pit Bull Terrier, have not had her DNA tested. I know she is part Dalmatian and looks and acts like an APBT. Anyway, the point is that I had someone tell me that she could have been picked up to be used as a bait dog or sold by druggies to dog fighters. I was half out of my head when she finally surfaced because of these concerns and it was also getting dark.

 

I think what actually happened is that someone spooked her. I hope that they did not hurt her. She stayed underneath someone’s camper for five hours. That is not normal behavior for my dog. I had taken her over to a neighbor’s camper to cheer the neighbor up. Cici loves this woman and I had taken her over there before yesterday. I will not take her over there again because when I went back to get her, the woman did not even know that Cici was missing, nor did she even come over to apologize to me, nor help me and others look for her.

Lost Dogs 

By the way, I did remember to Call Home Again, to let them know that she was lost. They will contact all local authorities for you with the dog’s photo and microchip info and will let you know if anyone has found the dog. Good service. And I asked all the neighbors I could find and asked for their help. And as I drove around, I asked everyone I could see and talk to if they saw my dog.  I also asked my online friends to pray, send good thoughts, vibes, send Cici and me light, for her to be found safe and sound before dark, asap. And a bunch of doggie mamas responded favorably to being asked and shared the news. A whole bunch of networking paid off.

 

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A Yorkie and an Aussie Shepherd and a pit bull, really?

Ok, now onto the Newsweek article. Read it if you will.

Here are my comments about it:

http://www.newsweek.com/pit-bulls-label-shelters-study-441318

I appreciate the overall stop labeling all dogs as pit bulls and leaving them in shelters. I do however want to clear up a couple of important things.

1. There are more like 20 breeds that can be labeled pit bull including mastiffs, pit bull terriers, the ones you mentioned and more.

2. The myth about locking jaws is a terrible myth. Talk to any vet or dog expert or dog owner, even.

It is a myth that keeps the dogs banned and deemed dangerous, scary, mean and vicious. Dog fighters and others who get their macho on from training dogs to be mean love these types of myths but the people who really love dogs and pit bulls know this is just a bunch of dangerous hype.

Not true, no such mechanism as a locking jaw. I know personally. I have opened up my dog’s mouth when she was latched onto something and did not want to let go. Terriers can be very stubborn and persistent. When they want something, they want it. And I have even stuck my hands into her mouth to get something out of there that she did not want to let go of. Like a child’s saying NO NO NO, this is a canine’s way of saying No, I want this and I am not going to let go of it. No locking jaw mechanism, just a stubborn terrier.

By the way, I emailed Newsweek with my comments and also commented on their Twitter.  Google them and let them know what you think.

 

My comment to Newsweek paid off, here it is:

Hello Sue,

Thank you so much for your comment on my article. I deleted the part about locked jaws and added a correction at the bottom of the article saying that locked jaws are a myth. The last thing I want is to make dogs labeled as pit bulls appear dangerous or scary in any way.

For your comment on other breeds labeled as pit bulls, I didn’t say that the three breeds I mentioned were the only breeds labeled as pit bulls, just that they are the most commonly labeled breeds. So a correction won’t be necessary, but thank you for the information. Hopefully one day we won’t have any breed labels.

Thank you,

Morgan Mitchell

Newsweek Magazine

 

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Cici 2

 

Mean dogs and dog bites / attacks

Below is what dog experts know to be red flags that can lead to dog bites / attacks.

Dog experts agree that the most dangerous types of dogs include:

1.  unfixed (not spayed, not neutered)

2. unsocialized and untrained (dogs left chained up 24/7 and not part of the family)

3. abused (dogs treated cruelly, hurt physically, verbally and / or used in unhealthy ways*)

4. sick (a dog that is hurt or sick)

5. mamas with puppies (watch out for mamas guarding their babies)

6. roaming in packs (dogs roaming the streets with no human guardian)

7. left alone with children (NEVER leave a dog alone with a child, NEVER)

8. an unknown dog (a dog that is not known to you). Get to know the dog slowly, through a fence, perhaps or with the owner/guardian.

LISTEN Up if the owner/guardian of a dog says that their dog is mean or vicious or whatever, BELIEVE THEM. They KNOW their dog, so BEWARE.

Please notice that in NONE of the above scenarios are breeds mentioned. Because ANY dog can be mean, vicious, attack or bite another dog or a human being. And statistics show that the dogs that do bite and / or attack are dogs in any and all of the categories shown above.

This is why Breed Specific Legislation does not work because bans and BSL target various breeds of dogs. And it is not because a dog is a certain breed that a dog bites or attacks. It is because of the red flag factors above. There can also be genetic imbalances and chemistry in dogs that make them react or respond in vicious ways (born with a defect).

*Dogs that are overbred, used in dog fighting, used as bait dogs and other such cases can be put into the abused category).

 

Better to be safe than sorry. Evaluate each dog on an individual basis and know dog’s body language and the red flags above. These will enable you to be responsible, prepared and able to prevent dog bites and attacks. Please share and educate others.

interior-pet-policy

 

True life example:

A very small dog with a mean disposition who barks, growls and snaps at other dogs got a lesson the other day when she approached the wrong dog, a larger dog, a dog that was not playing. The larger dog taught that small dog a lesson and the owner was very glad because his dog was cruising for a bruising and he knew it.

 

Now hopefully the small dog will think twice before snapping, growling and showing off her mean attitude to larger dogs (and maybe other dogs in general? one can only hope).

 

 

 

 

 

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how to talk to media about pit bulls

great discussion on pit bulletin legal news radio with Cathy Rosenthal

we have to not be emotional about these issues, just provide the info so people can feel that they are part of solving the problem (in the letter below I used her techniques for always associating pit bulls with positive, and reframing the question to educating people about dog bites, how media overreports on pit bulls and more.

http://radio.pblnn.com/shows/interviews/405-cathy-rosenthal-talking-to-the-media-about-pit-bull-terriers

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letter to respond to:

http://www.pasadenanow.com/main/councilmember-madison-says-city-cant-wait-pit-bulls-must-controlled-now

Councilmember Madison Says City Can’t Wait, Pit Bulls Must Be Controlled Now

By RACHEL YOUNG
Published: Wednesday, January 29, 2014 | 11:51 AM

Councilmember Steve Madison points to a pit bull attack this morning as further evidence that the City Council needs to pass his ordinance mandating all pit bulls be spayed or neutered.

Madison spoke this morning after a cyclist was forced to the roof of a car along Fair Oaks Avenue to escape the attack of three pit bull or pit bull mix dogs earlier today. Police officers shot all three dogs with a shotgun, killing one and injuring the other two.

“[Councilmember] Terry Tornek said the evidence doesn’t support it. I don’t know how someone could make that statement, it’s just so clearly false,” Madison said. “To me it’s a case where we should exercise our police power as a city, as a government to impose at least some modest regulation so that we address this.”

This attack comes on the heels of a similar report on Jan. 11 in which a growling pit bull trapped a man inside his car in Northwest Pasadena until the police arrived with a tazer gun. That dog shook off the tazer’s effect and ran away at that time, only to be captured days later.

“This is not something I’m making up. I don’t have anything against pit bulls per se, it’s just [that] no social scientist who looks at this data could draw any conclusion other than these dogs are very dangerous,” Madison said.

Madison pointed out that this attack comes just 36 hours before his colleagues had rejected a “modest” ordinance that did not impose a ban of pit bulls, but required them to be spayed and neutered. He noted that most of the “passionate pit bull lovers” were probably responsible and loving dog owners who already had their dogs spay and neutered.

“When you have a room packed full of passionate pit bull lovers and they’re telling you please don’t do this my dog is great, it’s easy just to put your finger in the wind and not act,” Madison said.

However, he said the conversation should be about the data and not each pit bull owner’s experience. He noted that last year 31 deaths in the country were caused by pit bulls. He also said five of five dog related deaths were caused by pit bulls last year in California, with three of those five being the family pet attacking a family member.

Madison says the City can’t wait six months to discuss a mandatory spay and neuter of all dogs because the problem right now is pit bulls.

“I’ve been working on pit bulls for years, everybody says ‘lets just study the issue.’ We don’t need to study this anymore. This is a clear and present danger and we need to act now. I’ll be happy to discus spay and neutering parakeets and lizards and goldfish and all the rest, but right now those aren’t the threats. The threats are pit bulls,” Madison said.

paw heart

editor@pasadenanow.com

Dear Editor,

re: Councilmember Madison mandatory spay and neuter

Everyone in the community is concerned about aggressive dogs and stopping dog bites. No one wants their dog to be killed or shot by police who are trying to deal with the problem of dogs roaming the streets. The mandatory spaying and neutering proposal will NOT solve the problem since breed is NOT a factor when it comes to dog bites and attacks. Councilmember Madison says that breed is the problem but bites by pit bulls are overeported by the media. He is focusing on breeds instead of focusing on the real reasons for dog bites.

It is important to know the factors that lead to dog bites so that REAL solutions can be implemented.

My next door neighbor’s dog is the perfect example of a dog who is potentially dangerous because of all of the red flag factors. Red flags: He is not neutered. He is left alone and isolated in the yard 24/7 rain, cold, sunshine/heat, and he is not socialized, not trained on how to act towards people and other dogs. This is a powerful dog with a lot of energy who is never walked nor exercised. He is frustrated, crying, whining and often heard howling. He is miserable. And if and when he ever escapes his captors yard, he may hurt someone since he does NOT know how to behave. This is not his fault. It is the fault of his guardians who refuse to neuter him, train, exercise and/or take him inside. Their dog is a powerful Siberian Husky who weighs about 150 pounds. It is not how this dog looks that will cause him to hurt someone, it is how he is being mistreated.

Other factors that lead to dog bites include dogs that roam the streets in packs, dogs who are chained up in a yard who can become territorial, leaving a dog outside 24/7, female dogs with babies who protect their offspring, dogs who have been abused, neglected and/or terrorized by humans, sick dogs, starved dogs and dogs who are trained to attack humans and/or other dogs.

In a 2008 study published in Applied Animal Behavior Science, dog breeds were ranked based on their propensity for aggression toward owners, strangers and other dogs. The breeds with the highest likelihood of directing aggression toward strangers were dachshunds and Chihuahuas, with 20 percent of the sample attempting to bite or biting humans, compared with 7 percent for pit bulls.

Other breeds rated highest for aggression toward strangers included Doberman pinschers, rottweilers, Yorkshire terriers and poodles. The study states that “scores for stranger-directed aggression found among pit bull terriers were inconsistent with their universal reputation as a ‘dangerous breed’ and their reported involvement in dog bite-related fatalities.” The high aggression breeds identified in the study send people to the emergency room and, even when they don’t, they can instill a lifelong paralyzing fear of dogs in children who constitute the majority of dog bite victims.

It is also important to learn canine body language. Dogs exhibit body postures that forecast how they are responding. In other words, dog give warning signals before they bite. If a dog is staring intently, tail stiff up, and /or growling, it is best to back away slowly from the dog.

And just because a dog (like my neighbor’s) has red flags does not necessarily mean that they WILL bite, only that the likelihood goes up for each factor. And even then, some dogs will NOT bite. Take, for example, the former Michael Vick dogs. Despite the fact that they were chained 24/7, were unsocialized, untrained and had been terrorized, abused and traumatized at Bad Newz Kennels, none of these pit bulls showed any aggression. Eight of them have become therapy dogs. Many are living in homes with children, other dogs, cats and other pets.

History and statistics tells us that solving the wrong problem will not bring an end to dog bites. Breed is not a factor when it comes to dog bites so to demand mandatory spaying and neutering of any particular breed of dog will not end the problem.

Thank you.

 

(they published my letter)

 

 

http://www.pasadenanow.com/main/opinion-everyone-in-the-community-is-concerned-about-agressive-dogs-and-stopping-dog-bites

 

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Filed under All you need is love, keep pets safe, media madness, pit bull, prejudice against dogs

Who let the pit bulls out?

Below is how to answer fear mongering anti pit bulls pro BSL letters/opinions published in newspapers…  Last week, the Orlando Sentinel published a couple of opinion pieces by noted and discredited pit bull hater Colleen Lynn… all about how safe Orlando will be when pit bulls are banned.

I wrote a letter to Mike Lafferty the Opinion editor and asked if Colleen Lynn should be banned from speaking about pit bulls and suggested that they pick more credible writers and also counter with differing opinions (which to his credit, they did, he informed me).

Here is how the pit bull community responded:

“We all want to live safely, including with dogs. With that purpose in mind, we should adopt policies that have succeeded, and avoid ones that failed.

Breed-specific regulation did not originate with pit bulls. Long Branch, N.J., banned the Spitz in 1878. Massachusetts banned bloodhounds in 1886. Australia prohibited the further importation of German Shepherd dogs in 1929.

None of these breed-specific regulations made communities safer, and all have long since been consigned to the dustbin reserved for government failures.”

http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/opinion/os-ed-front-burner-pit-bulls-con-20130523,0,5330359.story

“…This is how dog attacks happen. A dog is causing problems in a neighborhood, the owners are not responsive, people try to get somebody to do something and the people who are supposed to be addressing these issues (animal control or the police) don’t respond because there is no injured party and the threat to public safety isn’t abundantly obvious until the dog has either hurt someone or is threatening to do so right before the officer’s eyes.

“Today, the Sentinel ran an editorial from noted pit bull hater Colleen Lynn, who runs an organization called DogsBite.org., called “Banning pit bulls saves lives and protects the innocent.” She claims that pit bull bans will help keep communities safer because, in theory, the dogs that she thinks are doing all the biting won’t be around anymore. She cherry-picks a bunch of dubious statistics (for instance, she cites a dated CDC study that looked at dog breeds responsible for dog bites over a period of years that the CDC itself has said really didn’t prove much of anything; they’ve since stopped using breed as a way of categorizing dog bites because they say their findings weren’t really conclusive enough to draw conclusions) and some sensational information (for instance, she says pit bulls don’t let go of what they’re biting until they’re dead – which is why people sometimes say they are “dead game.” That’s a whole lot of malarkey, but also beside my point for now) and concludes that a pit bull ban would keep people from being mauled by dogs.”

http://blogs.orlandoweekly.com/index.php/2013/05/a-response-to-the-editorial-in-todays-sentinel-pit-bull-bans-not-the-answer/

blanketbabybully

butterball

familyportrait

http://photos.orlandoweekly.com/index.php/80-adorable-pit-bulls-who-want-you-to-know-they-are-family/sony-dsc/

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Filed under breed specific laws, dogs, pit bull, prejudice against dogs, Uncategorized

Pit bull fallacies refuted

Strolling through the Internet last night, actually did a Google search on my name, and I found this gem… Someone wrote about me and “pit bulls” regarding a letter/comment I posted last year in a Vail, Colorado newspaper. Apparently, the person who wrote this did NOT do her research so I am here to refute her statements that she has confused with facts.  Just to be clear, when someone says something and even quotes others, does not make the statements fact. A fact is a credible statement backed up by research.

for more info about pit bull myths, go here…

https://celiasue.com/2012/07/27/pit-bull-myths/

Here is the original article in the Vail paper

http://www.vaildaily.com/article/20111204/EDITS/111209954

here is my response to that article

http://www.vaildaily.com/article/20111206/LETTER/111209906

and below is a letter after what I wrote…

Before I begin, this study is pertinent…

Three MOST aggressive breeds

The number one aggressive breed out of the 33 dogs surveyed? The Dachshund. Yes – the wiener dog. The study found that “one in five dachshunds have bitten or tried to bite strangers, and a similar number have attacked other dogs; one in 12 have snapped at their owners.”

“Number two on the list is an even more diminutive breed – the Chihuahua, while Jack Russells came in third.

“The researchers say that the bite statistics that have been released in recent years are skewed because most dog bites are not reported. Big dog bites are more likely to require medical attention, but this does not mean that those breeds are doing the majority of the biting.”

http://www.dogguide.net/blog/2008/07/the-3-most-aggressive-dog-breeds-revealed-pit-bulls-rottweilers-youll-be-surprised/

What she says is highlighted by underlining… my comments are generally below her statements.

Dogged agenda

Who is Celia Sue Hecht? Do you know her? Is she your neighbor? I doubt it. 

She does not live in Eagle County or even Colorado. She lives in California. 

She is a writer and pit bull apologist who trolls the Internet looking for articles, such as the commentary from the Sunday, Dec. 4 Vail Daily by Melanie Pfeiffer about pit bulls. 

I do not apologize for pit bulls nor do I troll the Internet looking for articles. At times, people post articles to my Facebook page and if and when I HAVE TIME and ENERGY to respond to inaccuracies, I do so. And if I were a troll, apparently am not a very good one since it is now five months later. If I were trolling I would have come across her response months ago.

I am not disputing that Hecht has a right to her opinion. Furthermore, I think that the Vail Daily does have an obligation to present both sides to a story. But I do think it is pertinent to note that she is not a member of our community and that she is not unbiased.

Clearly she is a member of the community and is biased based on what she says…

She writes authoritatively in the Vail Daily that, “pit bull is not a breed: American Staffordshire terrier, American pit bull terrier and other breeds are all lumped together and called pit bulls.” 

Yet on her own website she writes that her own dog is a Dalmatian and pit bull mix — lumping together her own pet.

Ridiculous… for the sake of brevity on my blog I do not have a long dialogue about how I have not done a DNA test on my dog to determine whether she has American Pit Bull Terrier, American Staffordshire terrier, bulldog, mastiff, or any of the other 30 breeds routinely lumped together and labeled pit bull dogs in her… so I say she is a Dalmatian/pit bull mix …

Many dog breeds “can” fall under the blanket “pit bull” category.

These include:

•Alano Espanol
•American Pit Bull Terrier
•American Staffordshire Terrier
•Cane Corso
•Cordoba Fighting Dog
•Dogue de Bordeaux
•Japanese Tosa
•Perro de Presa Canario
•Staffordshire Bull Terrier

I challenge Ms. Edwards  to Find the Pit

http://www.pickthepit.com/

and I would ask Ms. Edwards 1. how many “pit bulls” she has personally met up close and personal and 2. how many millions of INNOCENT dogs killed would make her feel safe?  as it is, millions of INNOCENT “pit bull” type dogs are slaughtered every year in shelters across the country just because of discrimination against these dogs, stereotypes, ignorance and profiling.

Did you know that the MOST DECORATED dog in military history was a “pit bull” type dog Sergeant Stubby?

http://willmydoghateme.com/pet-cetera/the-dogs-of-war-sergeant-stubby

and remember, Petey the Little Rascals dog… guess what his breed was?

The substance of her commentary was a Christmas-letter catch-up on how Michael Vick’s dogs are doing.

absurd… the former V dogs are exemplary examples of how “pit bulls” actually are… these DOGS who were abused and traumatized and made to fight for their lives, to some people, are considered to be the meanest, most vicious “pit bull” type dogs and what I pointed out is that “pit bulls” are NOT inherently mean nor vicious by virtue of the FACT that eight of the former V dogs have become therapy dogs and many are living with other dogs, cats and children as family pets.

 

That they have not have killed another dog or child somehow is proof that we all have it wrong when it comes to pit bulls.

there are no incidents to date of a spayed/neutered indoor family pit bull EVER having killed anyone.

…[S]ince 1975, dogs belonging to more than 30 breeds have been responsible for fatal attacks on people, including Dachshunds, a Yorkshire Terrier, and a Labrador Retriever.” (It’s also key to point out that you are more likely to be killed by lightening than a dog, and dog bites are at historic lows.)

http://stubbydog.org/2012/05/pit-bulls-by-the-numbers/

Yes, Ms. Hecht is entitled to her opinions, but that does not mean that they have any merit, as she lacks any credentials giving her one iota of credibility. 

She is a dog owner. I mean, pit bull owner.

My credentials:

30 years as a Journalist who knows how and DOES research

5-1/2 years as a dog owner makes me an expert… when I first rescued my dog I was told she was a Dalmatian mix… I knew NOTHING about “pit bulls.”   After many people asked me if she was a “pit bull” I spent HOURS doing research. And found that my dog does indeed have numerous characteristics of the American Pit Bull Terrier… blocky head, extremely friendly towards people and children, silly and goofy personality, slobberpuss and more.

Observing my dog’s 1,000+ interactions with more than 600 dogs of all breeds (including her play with our neighbor’s dogs, Australian Shepherds, chi mix and mini poodle next door, Siberian Husky and her new doggie pal Harley, a 10 pound Havanese) and farms animals including cows, horses, chickens, sheep, llamas and even Himalayan yaks and elk, and seeing her response to six attacks from other dogs mostly at dog parks (she generally goes into submission, showing off her belly), PLUS intimately living with this dog day and night, sleeping with her, playing with her, putting my fingers in her mouth, watching her with other people, I have NOT seen any signs of aggression… not when a dog had her by the throat, another dog made her eye bleed, and another dog chewed a piece out of her head. On another occasion, for four days, a dog growled and snapped at her continuously and she IGNORED the other dog’s aggression preferring to play with the other dog on the property. One dog trainer told me that she wished HER dog acted so gently and cautiously when meeting a new doggie friend.

So what exactly are YOUR credentials, Ms Edwards, besides living in Vail, being a mother and cat owner?  You don’t say. Hysteria is not a credential, nor is relying on FAULTY  “facts” and fake science that have been disproved time and time again by EXPERTS.

and you also deny 150 years of HISTORY

http://www.ywgrossman.com/photoblog/?p=1103

One dog breed achieved such a rock solid reputation with children that for 150 years it was known as America’s “Nanny Dog”.

temperament testing reveals that pit bulls score gentler than 121 other breeds

Temperament evaluations by the American Temperament Test Society have given pit bull terriers a very high passing rate of 90.6 percent. The average passing rate for the other 121 breeds of dogs in the tests was only a low 77 percent.

The American Temperament Test Society determined that pit bulls were less aggressive in confrontational situations than many stereotypically friendly breeds, scoring 86% in overall ability to interact appropriately in public — versus the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel (83%), the Miniature Poodle (78%) and the Old English Sheepdog (77%).

Beyond a dog’s breed, factors that affect a dog’s tendency toward aggression include reproductive status, sex, early experience and socialization/training. According to the Centers for Disease Control, these concerns are well-founded, given that:

  • More than 70 percent of all dog bite cases involve unneutered male dogs.
  • An unneutered male dog is 2.6 times more likely to bite than is a neutered dog.
  • A chained or tethered dog is 2.8 times more likely to bite than a dog not chained or tethered.
  • 97 percent of dogs involved in fatal attacks on people in 2006 (the most recent year statistics are available) were not spayed/neutered.

What does the science say? (NOTE:  THIS IS NOT NOT NOT SCIENCE)

 “The pit bull’s massive canine jaws can crush a victim with up to 2,000 pounds of pressure per square inch — three times that of a German shepherd or Doberman pinscher” (dogbitelaw.com). “The pit bull is quicker to anger than most dogs. … Pit bulls are frighteningly tenacious; their attacks frequently last for 15 minutes or longer, and nothing — hoses, violent blows or kicks — can easily stop them. That’s because of the third behavioral anomaly: the breed’s remarkable insensitivity to pain” (www.city-journal.org).

http://stubbydog.org/2011/12/yes-pit-bulls-suddenly-snap/

http://nationalcanineresearchcouncil.com/uploaded_files/publications/230603563_Pit%20Bull%20Placebo.pdf

Dr. Lehr Brisbin of the University of Georgia wrote:

“The few studies which have been conducted of the structure of the skulls, mandibles and teeth of pit bulls show that, in proportion to their size, their jaw structure and thus its inferred functional morphology, is no different than that of any breed of dog. There is absolutely no evidence for the existence of any kind of “locking mechanism” unique to the structure of the jaw and/or teeth of the American Pit Bull Terrier.”

A German Shepherd Dog, American Pit Bull Terrier (APBT), and Rottweiler were tested using a bite sleeve equipped with a specialized computer instrument to measure bite pressure. The APBT had the least amount of pressure of the 3 dogs tested. (Source: Dr. Brady Barr of National Geographic)

“There is no scientific evidence that one kind of dog is more likely than another to injure a human being than any other kind of dog.[i][ii] In fact, there is affirmative evidence to the contrary.[iii]

[i] http://www.avma.org/advocacy/state/issues/javma_000915_fatalattacks.pdf (Accessed April 27, 2011).

[ii] http://www.cdc.gov/HomeandRecreationalSafety/Dog-Bites/dogbite-factsheet.html (Accessed April 27, 2011).

[iii] S. Ott, et al, “Is There a Difference? Comparison of Golden Retrievers and Dogs Affected by Breed-Specific Legislation Regarding Aggressive Behavior,” Jrnl of Vet. Beh., 2008, 3, 134-140.

http://nationalcanineresearchcouncil.com/dogbites/whatisadogbite/

What does an animal behavior expert say? Temple Grandin (from Colorado), writing in her book “Animals in Translation,” notes, “On average, rottweiler’s and pit bulls are so much more aggressive than other breeds that it’s extremely unlikely bad owners alone could account for the higher rate of biting. … Aggression isn’t always the owner’s fault. … Don’t let people tell you that rottweiler or pit bull aggression is a myth. It’s not.”

What do the Centers for Disease Control say? “At least 25 breeds of dogs have been involved in 238 human dog-bite-related fatalities during the past 20 years. Pit bull-type dogs and rottweilers were involved in more than half of these deaths.” 

Lisa Peterson, spokeswoman for the American Kennel Club, the AKC is opposed to BSL, which Peterson compares to racial profiling. She says, “When there is an incident in a local area, the reaction is to create a dangerous dog law, and sometimes lawmakers react with breed bans because that breed of dog that was involved in an incident. A law that targets a breed because a single dog was involved in an incident is not a good law.”

a study by the University of Colorado School of Medicine conducted between 2003 and 2008 determined that unsupervised children ages five and younger are at the greatest risk for dog bites, and that family pets, including a high percentage of breeds considered “good” with children such as Labrador retrievers, are the most frequent offenders.

“My kids are around pit bulls every day. In the ’70s they blamed Dobermans, in the ’80s they blamed German shepherds, in the ’90s they blamed the Rottweiler. Now they blame the pit bull.”    Cesar Millan.  “Pit bulls get a bad rap because of irresponsible owners….”

Victoria Stilwell, dog trainer, It’s Me or the Dog

“It’s a Witch Hunt”

Victoria Stilwell on Breed Specific Legislation, “I am a mother. I am also a dog owner and dog trainer who has committed my life to helping people find the most effective, humane and responsible way to live in harmony with their dogs while also affording them the respect they deserve.

…The general concept underpinning BSL is that the most effective way to determine whether or not a certain dog could potentially pose a threat to humans is by classifying and generalizing entire breeds of dogs as ‘dangerous’, regardless of the individual dog’s temperament, behavioral history or owner’s actions.

It continues to confound me that there are still proponents of BSL given both the behavioral science which is now available and the abysmal track record of municipalities that have attempted to curb dog attacks by instituting BSL. We know so much more than we did even 20 years ago about how dogs think, what they feel, how their brains are wired (very similarly to ours, as it turns out), and what could potentially cause them to aggress. Ironically, one of the most commonly found attributes among aggressive dogs is not their breed, but rather a lack of confidence and insecurity. Think of the typical schoolyard bully – is he generally a self-confident kid or one who actually suffers from significant insecurity issues? The same general concept can be applied to dogs.

“Regardless, counties, cities and entire countries around the world continue to turn to BSL policies in a desperate attempt to protect their public from the rising number of serious (and sometimes fatal) dog bites. I share this desire to reduce the number of dog attacks. As a doting mother of a beautiful 7 year old girl, my heart literally breaks every time I hear about another child who has been mauled by the family dog, which is why I have set up a Dog Bite Prevention Task Force to help educate the public about responsible dog handling and safety. The vast majority of fatal dog attacks share one glaring yet often-overlooked characteristic: usually at least one component of the scene is not in its usual environment. Either the dog is staying with the uncle, the grandparents are babysitting for the child, or someone outside their normal circumstance is placed as the primary guardian. The key to avoiding these tragedies is not to make owning certain breeds illegal, but rather to ensure that everyone in charge of dogs and/or children is educated about safe practices and never leaves any dog alone with any child.

“Pit bulls can make great family pets in the hands of a responsible owner

Simply put, any breed of dog can bite, and any breed of dog can make a perfect family pet. Yes, the bigger and stronger the dog, the more damage it is capable of inflicting, although I have seen horrific footage of bite wounds from small dogs such as Jack Russell Terriers and Chihuahuas as well. Which breed of dog was named ‘most aggressive’ in recent scientific studies?  The family Dachshund.

“…Statistics have shown that throughout the world, wherever BSL has been initiated, the number of dog bites has actually increased since the legislation has passed. This is the case in Scotland, England, parts of Canada, certain cities in the US, the Netherlands and beyond. In every single case, dog bites have become more of a problem since governments began banning breeds. What more evidence do we need as a society to realize that BSL is ultimately ineffective, if not also unfair?”

http://positively.com/2011/04/06/why-bsl-doesnt-work/

Those breeds do not, however, make up half the dogs owned in America.

Ms. Pfeiffer writes, “I can honestly say that in three out of four cases (dog fights), an American pit bull terrier is involved.”

So what’s my agenda? I live in this community, Arrowhead. I have small children. And I’m, ahem, a cat owner.

Deirdre Noble Edwards

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dog bite prevention

Nationwide last year, 5,577 postal employees were attacked in more than 1,400 cities. Los Angeles topped the list with 83 postal employees attacked in 2011. Beyond the needless pain and suffering, medical expenses from dog attacks cost the Postal Service nearly $1.2 million last year. 

  • “Children are three times more likely than adults to be bitten by a dog,” said PTB President Kathy Voigt, whose daughter Kelly, was mauled by a neighborhood dog. “Education is essential to keeping children safe from dog bites.” The attack prompted their creation of Prevent The Bite, a non-profit organization that promotes dog bite prevention to young children.
  • AAP President Dr. Robert Block added, “Parents, please don’t ever leave a young child unsupervised around any dog, even a dog well-known to your family. Even very young children should be taught not to tease or hurt animals. And with school almost over for the year, children will be spending more time in parks, at friends’ homes, and other places where they may encounter dogs. They need to know what to do to minimize the risk of being bitten.”
  • According to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, in 2011 alone more than 29,000 reconstructive procedures were performed as a result of injuries caused by dog bites.   Dr. Michael Neumeister, ASRM president said, “Even the friendliest dog may bite when startled or surprised. Be cautious, once a child is scarred they are scarred for life. We hear this line all the time ‘The dog has never bitten anyone before.’ A dog’s reaction to being surprised or angered is not predictable.”
  •  “Any dog can bite,” said Dr. René Carlson, AVMA president. “If it is physically or mentally unhealthy, is in pain, feels threatened, or is protecting its food or a favorite toy, it can bite. It is important to understand how dogs behave and how our behavior may be interpreted by a dog.”
  • “Dog attacks accounted for more than one-third of all homeowner insurance liability claims paid out in 2011,” said Dr. Robert Hartwig, III president and chief economist

The National Dog Bite Prevention Week partners offer the following tips:

 

Avoiding Attacks

·       Never leave a baby or small child alone with a dog.

·       Don’t run by a dog. The dog’s natural instinct is to chase and catch you.

·       If you feel threatened by a dog, don’t scream. Avoid eye contact. Try to remain motionless until the dog leaves, then back away slowly until the dog is out of sight.

·       Never approach a strange dog, especially one that’s tethered or confined.

·       Don’t disturb a dog that is sleeping, eating or caring for puppies.

·       Anyone wanting to pet a dog should first obtain permission from the owner.

·       Always let a dog see and sniff you before petting the animal.

·       If you believe a dog is about to attack you, try to place something between yourself and the dog, such as a backpack or a bicycle.

·       If you are knocked down by a dog, curl into a ball and protect your face with your hands.

 

Be a Responsible Dog Owner

·         Obedience training can teach a dog to behave properly and help owners control their dogs.

·         When letter carriers and others who are not familiar with your dog come to your home, keep your dog inside, in another room away from the door.

·         In protecting their territory, dogs may interpret people’s actions as a threat.

·         Spay or neuter your dog. Neutered dogs are less likely to roam.

·         Dogs that receive little attention or handling, or are left tied up for long periods of time, frequently turn into biters.

If Bitten

§         Rinse the bite area with soapy water.

§         Elevate limb(s) that have been bitten.

§         Apply antiseptic lotion or cream. Watch the area for signs of infection for several days after the incident.

§         For deeper bites or puncture wounds, apply pressure with a clean bandage or towel to stop the bleeding. Then wash the wound, dry it and cover with a sterile dressing. Don’t use tape or butterfly bandages to close the wound. 

§         It’s a good idea to call your child’s physician because a bite could require antibiotics or a tetanus shot.  The doctor also can help you to report the incident.

§         If your child is bitten severely, call 9-1-1 or go to the emergency room.

§         When going to the emergency room, advise the personnel of:

         your tetanus vaccination status;

         vaccine status of the dog;

         who the dog owner is; and,

         if the dog has bitten before.

2011 U.S. Postal Service Top 25 Dog Attack Rankings

Ranking City/Location Attacks
1 Los Angeles, CA 83
2 San Diego, CA 68
3 Houston, TX 47
4 Cleveland, OH 44
6 Dallas, TX 41
6 San Antonio, TX 39
7 Phoenix, AZ 36
8 Denver, CO , and Sacramento , CA 35 each
9 Minneapolis, MN , and St. Louis , MO 32 each
10 Louisville, KY 31
11 Chicago, IL , and Philadelphia , PA 30 each
12 Seattle, WA 28
13 Brooklyn, NY , and Portland , OR 27 each
14 Baltimore, MD , and San Francisco , CA 26 each
15 Dayton, OH , and Detroit , MI 25 each
16 Cincinnati, OH ; Oakland and San Jose , CA 24 each
17 Ft. Worth, TX 23
18 Buffalo, NY and Miami , FL 22
19 Indianapolis, IN 21
20 El Paso, TX and Memphis , TN 20 each
21 Oklahoma City, OK 19
22 Kansas City, MO; Las Vegas, NV; Long Beach, CA; Pittsburgh, PA; Richmond, VA; and Tacoma, WA 18 each
23 Jamaica, NY; Milwaukee , WI , and Washington , DC 17 each
24 Charlotte, NC , and Orlando , FL 16 each
25 Baton Rouge, LA , and Rochester , NY 15 each
Blog Hop time…  thanks to Life with Dogs,Two Little Cavaliers and Confessions of the Plume…  grab the blog hop code…

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bit by a dog…

at 7 am this morning, cici was lying peacefully at my feet underneath the desk while I was on the computer. Morgan came over and let cici know that was not ok, her turf or whatever.

morgan kept sniping at cici all day yesterday and finally this morning cici had enough and they got into it… and I got bit by Morgan while pulling them apart. Put cici in the car and she was fine and docile. then put morgan behind a closed door and she yapped for an hour.

Cici was playing sweetly with Chloe and the two of them were very cute together. Chloe is tiny, maybe 8-10 pounds. Cici went into submissive mode with her a few times to let her know that she was not going to hurt her and Chloe played with her and snacked on pencils and other stuff on the floor.

My leg hurts, the bite is right near where I have a scar from falling on the beach in Carmel in June. ouchie…

I think that if a dog snipes and yaps at your dog, keep your dog away… the dog is aggressive, maybe passive aggressive, has issues, dominance and you do not want anyone to get hurt. at least neither of the dogs got hurt but now I have to keep them apart.

http://www.safety.com/articles/how-to-take-care-of-dog-and-cat-bites-cleaning-and-treatment-steps.html


How to Take Care of Dog and Cat Bites: Cleaning and Treatment Steps

When the dog (or cat) bites, you need to take action immediately. A 1999 study by David Talan of the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) and the Emergency Medicine Animal Bite Infection Study Group showed that animal bites could introduce bacteria that cause serious, even potentially fatal, infections. The study found staph, strep, and bacteria from the Pasteurella family, as well as other disease-causing bacteria. You can see that it’s important to clean and treat bite wounds, but know that some bites will require a visit to the doctor.

Immediate Bite Care
Don’t waste time after you’ve been bitten. Follow these steps, as well as any after-care steps, in order to play it safe:

  • Wash the area with soap and water
  • Use pressure from clean towels to stop bleeding
  • Cover the wound with a sterile bandage
  • Raise the wound above your heart to reduce swelling
  • Leave wounds uncovered after a few hours, unless on the face
  • Rub on antibiotic ointment twice daily

When to See a Doctor
Taking care of your wounds at home may not be enough, especially if your health is already affected by diabetes, cancer, or a weakened immune system. Also, if you haven’t had a tetanus booster in over five years, you are at greater risk for developing lockjaw.

Seek medical care for:

  • Any cat bite
  • A dog bite to the head, hand, or foot
  • A deep, gaping wound
  • Bleeding that doesn’t stop after 15 minutes of pressure
  • Possible broken bones, nerve damage, or other trauma
  • Symptoms of infection including swelling, redness, warmth, oozing pus, increasing soreness, and fever

How the Doctor Treats Bite Wounds
The doctor will look at the wound to determine treatment. Depending on the type of damage, any of the following may be part of your care:

  • Flushing the wound with water or saline
  • Removing damaged tissue
  • Checking tendons or nerves for damage, as well as bones
  • Using stitches to close the wound, although wounds are often kept open to aid in healing
  • Giving a tetanus shot
  • Ordering antibiotics, usually in the case of high-risk wounds or if the wound is very infected
  • Scheduling a follow-up for a few days later
  • Referring you to a specialist or sending you to a hospital, if needed

Rabies Treatment Information
Don’t overlook the risk of rabies infection. Although it is rare in domestic pets, it’s good to be cautious. The dog or cat that bit you should be quarantined for ten days to see if it develops symptoms of rabies. Luckily, you will need shots only if the animal can’t be found, it shows signs of rabies, or if it tests positive for rabies. If you do need the shot series, your first shot should be given very soon after the bite, followed by a series of five shots over a 28-day period.

Take Cat and Dog Bites Seriously
Although bites are more common than people like to think, don’t make the mistake of ignoring your wounds. Prevent infection — your health depends upon it.

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