Tag Archives: horses

Best Friends Redux

in town, Kanab, Utah, there are some new chain hotels that are pet friendly such as Comfort suites, Holiday inn, and Hampton inn with pet fees of $10 or twenty per pet per night and also a few others that are not chains such as Parry lodge, which also has a coffee shop. if you are visiting Best friends, it is easier to get around by staying right in kanab. there are other properties that are twenty or thirty miles away. these are pet friendly but then you have to drive forty to sixty miles a day, if you are volunteering.

 

The prices from April until September, high season, are higher than at other times of the year. The weather in the summer can be very humid and hot. Cici and I visited during mid-March and it is already in the 80’s, the prices are not so high and there are not as many tourists, although as we drove through Zion, it was pretty filled up and crowded with hikers.

 

Please call the Best Friends Welcome Center at 435-644-2001, ext. 4537 or email them at welcomecenter@bestfriends.org  and ask to be scheduled on a tour.

Tour times are:
8:30 a.m.10 a.m.,  1 p.m.  or  2:30 p.m.

 

I asked about the rest of the Vicktory Dogs who are still there. The Welcome Center does include info about them during the tour.

This is what I was told.
“One of them is court-ordered to stay here for life and the other three  have special circumstances that make it likely that they will live out their lives here which is just fine with their caregivers who love them. The Vicktory Dogs who are still here are not comfortable with strangers so actually meeting the dogs isn’t possible. Mya and Curly are extremely shy. Next January will be the 10th anniversary of their arrival here. So time is marching on. Out of the 22 who came to Best Friends, we are happy that 13 of them were able to be adopted.”

 

 

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http://bestfriends.org/donate/sponsor-an-animal/curly

 

http://bestfriends.org/stories-blog-videos/latest-news/vicktory-dogs-nine-years-later

 

I also visited the little store that BFAS has in town because they had a sign that said cat cuddling. i WAS game.  there were only two cats in there but one of them reminded me of my baby boy Abundance, a black cat with some white on his chest and paws. Had not expected that. Touched my heart.

 

Also got to spend some time chatting with Kevin Johnson, now retired, who used to work at BFAS, his wife still does. They adopted Ray one of the V-dogs, who passed a couple of years ago. Now they have three other pit bulls, Bosco, Bubba and Turtle and numerous parrots and a cat. Each have their own challenges. We shared pit bull stories and specific instances of dogs and love and opportunities of being a guardian of the furry creatures. Of course, Cici slobbered all over Kevin’s legs and showed off her belly.

 

 

 

 

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Filed under animals, Best Friends, best friends animal sanctuary, dog travel, dogs, Michael Vick dogs, pet travel, pit bull, Uncategorized

No ifs ands or goat butts

I made a new friend today… a goat.  Well, a few friends but one in particular seemed to enjoy my company.

My new goat friend ate some bread out of my hand and proceeded to sit underneath my chair. Horns and all. The chickens joined in the party for the bread and pecked it off the ground.

Cici and I stayed on the property of “Manifest” aka Shaun in Joshua Tree. He has 37 goats (and two dozen chickens on his land plus a rabbit or two, a scorpion, squirrels and some bats (who eat mosquitoes).

Cici thinks that the goats are fun to chase, except when they let her know when she is out of bounds. She does not seem as interested in the chickens and roosters. Maybe she thinks she is a goat without any horns? She wants to play and is learning how to play nice.

There are also UFO sightings in the area at Great Rock and Integratron in Landers and other places near the Joshua Tree National Park. Looks like we may have caught something on camera. What do you think ?

 

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Manifest’s story with goats begins with his wanting to get an awesome Australian Shepherd as a pet dog, doesn’t everybody? Instead a goat named Dada Aye followed him around and has become his mascot. Dada is 5 years old, half-Nigerian dwarf, half-pigmy and four years later, she gave birth to a daughter named Shou Aye. He has trained these two to be his service pets. And they go with him practically everywhere he goes to swap meets and other places.

He also has a dozen males and three of each breed, Nigerian, Nubian and Pygmy, that he is hoping to breed with females to get a Griffin. The little baby goats are adorable.

 

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Born and raised in Los Angeles, Manifest spent much time rock climbing in Joshua Tree from the time he was 17 to twenty-five. He also was a captain of a sport fishing boat in the waters off San Diego.

He thinks goats are special animals and here’s why.

“What I love about goats is that they are the closest animals to nature and source. They are the elves of the forest. They cultivate plants, grass and trees. They bring vibrancy to the land. Goats are simple like a four wheel dog. Their bodies are durable, endure weather better than dogs, like micro-camelettes,” he explained.

He has about two dozen chickens and roosters, Golden Phoenix, American and Cochin.

 

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Manifest has a dream of creating Eco pets, animals that clean your garden and neighborhood, provide superfood (milk), without hormones, no pesticides, and no preservatives), pets that give back and have a job to do.

He has been learning a lot from his goats. “Goats live a simple life. They enjoy their days. Watching the world go by. Chewing their food. They go to sleep and wake up the next day and do the same thing all over again. People, meanwhile, live to work and work hard and have no time in their lives to enjoy life. Everyone’s working too many hours to keep up the Joneses and just to get by and we cannot even afford to live anymore. We don’t respect and honor products that are made well to last. Instead, we buy items that last a month rather than years. Everything is temporary not permanent. Throw away junk.”

Goats have a different perspective on life than humans do.

“Goats interact with nature every day and enjoy trees. They preserve and protect and grow life. They use trees to mark their territory, sharpen their horns, to convene together, come back together as a community. They have their favorite trees and do well eating Mesquite, Palo Verde and non-fruited Mulberries. Will eat creosote and non-native grasses in a pinch. They limit growth and keep the grass short. They give something back.

“The way they communicate with one another is through their actions and activities. Food makes goats happy. They respond to whistles and commands. And interact with one another through rubbing the nape of the neck, stomping of hooves, mane and tails, and howling and other noises. During mating season, late August through early October, the males are especially loud with snorts and hollering, stomping their feet, pawing the ground, and showing off to the females their level of vibrancy. This is very equestrian in nature.

“I think the Tasmanian devil was based upon a goat, emulating a goat. They get wound up and it can require a good amount of patience and persistence to train them. It did not take me as long as I thought it would to make my goats great pets. Goats want to be friendly and sociable with humans. Most humans have not taken the time to get to know them as pets. They throw them in a pen but the goats don’t want to be left alone. They are smart and want to communicate with us,” he concluded.

a new paper published in Frontiers in Zoology, (says that) goats have fewer commonalities with their dull farm counterparts and belong instead on the ungulate honor roll. These furry, hoofed eating machines appear more sheep- or mini-cow-like in their demeanor, but their IQs likely put even the most astute steer to shame, the researchers—real men and women who stare at goats—found.

“The researchers, who hail from Queen Mary University of London and the Institute of Agricultural Science in Switzerland, long suspected that goats might be more intelligent than they seem. For example, goats live in complex social groups; they are experts at getting at hard-to-reach foods (goats in the Morocco, for example, are known for climbing trees in search of tasty sprigs); they live a long time, meaning they are better able to build up a repertoire of memories and skills than some short-lived animals; and despite the misconception that goats eat garbage, they are surprisingly picky eaters, able to adeptly pick leaves off of thorn bushes or seek out just the right sprig of grass.

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/never-underestimate-goat-not-stupid-looks-180950265/#hmHtswFS1PjKEHOI.99

Did you know that the origins of the saying “getting your goat” references “an old English (Welsh?) belief that keeping a goat in the barn would have a calming effect on the cows, hence producing more milk. When one wanted to antagonize/terrorize one’s enemy, you would abscond with their goat rendering their milk cows less- to non-productive.”

So goats were known as the great calmers of nature and were kept in stables to calm down thoroughbred horses.

 

Goat Therapy = Goat Yoga

Were goats the original horse whisperers and/or cow whisperers?  And how about pairing humans with goats during Goat Yoga?

“You know, I’m in this horrible state but they’re making me laugh—that’s the therapy part, goats just being goats,” she says. “It was just so hard to be depressed and sad when—even when I was in pain I would forget about it because of them. They use horses a lot for therapy, and dogs, but nobody uses goats and I just wonder why. They’re hilarious animals!”

http://www.alternet.org/culture/heres-real-story-behind-internet-famous-goat-yoga

My new goat friend thinks goats are fun and  perfect for doing yoga with, for therapy purposes as well as calming people and other animals down.  He has his work cut out for him with Shaun, who has a rotten temper, is a bully, has a bad reputation with his neighbors and thinks he knows everything. Oh well…

 

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The goat is not sure about interacting with my computer and becoming famous on the Internet. No ifs ands or goat butts …

 

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Fighting Over Dogs and Cats

Nowadays, many of us pet parents, consider our fur babies our children. There is nothing wrong with that, in my humble opinion. Except that the law considers them property not kids. Still, issues like divorce bring up similar considerations between spouses, what to do about the fur kids. Who gets to “keep” the fur kids? Will custody be shared? Can one party “keep” the fur baby and how often can the other party visit? Below an attorney, guest blogger, Charla Bradshaw, flushes out the issues more fully.

I don’t wanna get divorced…

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http://www.buzzfeed.com/paws/sad-puppies-that-will-ruin-your-day#

more info:

http://www.womansdivorce.com/pet-custody.html

Consider making up a pre-pup arrangement (like a pre-nup) that spells out what happens to your pets if your marriage splits up.

True Love American Style

  “We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals”

                                -Immanuel Kant

The American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers conducted a poll of 1,500 members and nearly a quarter said they had noticed an increase in custody issues over pets. Courts have had to determine not only who gets the pet but whether one party has the right to see the pet after the marriage breaks up.  Identifying the best interests of the pet in a divorce case can safeguard that the pet is properly cared for after divorce.

Pets can provide unbelievable companionship and unconditional love for adults and children.  Animals such as dogs, cats and horses are considered personal property for divorce purposes and unfortunately can also be the subject of domestic violence.

In a divorce, pets must be awarded as part of the property division and therefore will usually go to one spouse or the other.  However, spouses can choose to co-own the pet going forward and create a visitation schedule for the pet.  We have done these orders and they actually work very well.  We also see pet schedules associated with a child’s visitation schedule where the pet goes with the child.  When spouses co-own a pet, going forward, we must provide provisions for the expenses related to the animal. This can be important when dealing with livestock, such as horses, or an animal that has health issues.

Since pets are considered personal property, there can be disputes over whether the pet is the separate property of one of the spouses or community property.  Separate property can be acquired by a gift, inheritance, or if the property was owned on the date of marriage.  Separate property cannot be divided by a court.  Spouses may argue over whether the pet was a “gift”, or whether the spouses bought the pet together, making the pet community property subject to being awarded to one spouse or the other.

Unfortunately, pets are often targets in family violence but Texas has come to the rescue.  Texas courts can now include pets in protective orders in domestic violence cases. Because pets have suffered abuse when family violence has occurred, in 2011 the Texas legislature amended the law to prohibit the removal of animals from the possession of a person named in the protective order.  In a protective order, the court may prohibit a party from removing a pet, companion animal, or assistance animal, as defined by Section 121.002 of the Human Resources Code, from the possession or actual or constructive care of a person named in the protective order.  The “actual or constructive care” verbiage was added in 2013.  In turn, in 2013, the Texas Penal Code was amended to specify what the possession of a pet, companion animal, or assistance animal by a person actually means.

So what do these protective order laws actually mean for pets?  They mean that a person subject to a protective order that violates a pet provision in the protective order can go to jail, plain and simple.  An abuser will often turn on a pet to cause pain and suffering not only to the pet, but to the perpetrator’s victim(s).  An abuser may also threaten a pet’s life in order to keep their victim(s) close.  As a result, a victim may stay in an abusive situation to keep the companionship of the pet, not realizing the court can make orders with regard to the pet.

One of the problems is that most facilities and shelters for those running from family violence are not equipped to take animals and therefore the animals are left behind. There is a growing need in this regard not only for the safety of the pet but because the unconditional love a pet can give may be lost at the time it is needed the most.

Divorce or abuse can actually take a toll on a pet.  The Humane Society of the United States sets forth the following signs of pet stress:

•    They become depressed

•    They sleep a lot

•    Their appetite lessens

•    They’re not interested in their walks or other daily activities

•    They start to cry or whimper

•    They groom, lick and/or bite themselves excessively

•    They have accidents in the home

The bottom line is that pets are often the subject of divorce and family violence and the laws are improving to protect them.  It is important for everyone to be aware of these laws especially so that abuse victims may realize the court can include a pet in a protective order.  Abuse is bad enough for the lives of those who suffer it, but losing or leaving behind a pet can only make the suffering worse.

Victims asking a court for a protective order should ask the court to make orders regarding their pet(s).  Additionally, spouses in a divorce should be aware that pet(s) are property.  Sadly, a pet may become the subject of a very expensive fight when the real issue is to cause pain to the other spouse.

Charla Bradshaw is an accomplished family law attorney and Denton Managing Shareholder known for successfully summarizing some of the most difficult cases. She was listed among the Top 50 Women Lawyers in Texas (2014) and rated one of the Best Women Lawyers in North Texas by D Magazine. While she employs an aggressive approach to litigating family law cases, Charla Bradshaw is also a certified mediator and handles collaborative law cases.

This is a blog hop post… click on link here

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Survivors of OK tornado

Some truly amazing miracle stories have been told with pet guardians and their dogs after the tornadoes in Oklahoma and Texas… here are a few:

Barbara Garcia, a resident of Moore, Oklahoma, who survived yesterday’s potentially historic tornado, was being interviewed by CBS News about riding out the storm in the bathroom of her former home.

Garcia was holding on to her dog when the winds came, but after the walls fell down the two separated, and she had been unable to locate him since.

Then, in the middle of the interview, little “Toto” suddenly emerged from the rubble, and the two were reunited in the most tearjerking of fashions.

“Well I got God to answer one prayer to let me be okay, but he answered both of them,” Garcia said.

CBS: http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=50147264n

 

The goal is to raise $50,000 to buy her a new home, and people have donated $30,000 in just four days!

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/05/26/barbara-garcia-dog-bowser-oklahoma-tornado_n_3339950.html?ncid=edlinkusaolp00000009

 

This woman was going to work when sirens were going off about the tornado so she turned back and went home to her dog. The two of them spent their time in her bathtub with pillows as protection and they survived the storm.

http://kfor.com/2013/05/20/woman-saves-dog-rides-out-moore-tornado-in-tub/

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In Texas, this man was inside his mobile home with his dog, an adorable pit bull, holding the dog in his arms when the tornado came and literally ripped the dog from his arms. Amazingly, the man and his dog were reunited when the dog was found in a nearby shelter after the storm.

http://www.cnn.com/video/data/2.0/video/weather/2013/05/18/ac-pkg-kaye-texas-storm-pet-reunion.cnn.html

more survival stories about pets

http://www.buzzfeed.com/ryanhatesthis/moving-stories-of-oklahoma-tornado-victims-finding-their-pet

Ways everyone can help the animals in Moore Oklahoma, Please share…
http://www.examiner.com/article/animals-need-help-moore-oklahoma?cid=db_articles

Our thoughts and prayers are with everyone affected by the disaster in Oklahoma. We hope for peace and health to those searching for their loved ones and recovering from the devastation.

Some of the displaced dogs… please help them be reunited with their owners, share.

https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.574182702604564.1073741828.321167654572738&type=1

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Filed under Adventure, animal rescue, dog rescue, dogs, four paws up, horses, Uncategorized

Sing with wolves

saw these places on Animal Rescue TV on Saturday morning…

the first is a beautiful sanctuary for horses near Los Angeles in Acton, CA… the horses are given lots of room/acreage to roam… and they also participate in the Horses for Healing program… when I lived in Arizona a few years ago, I met some gorgeous horses at a sanctuary… they all surrounded me including a few ponies and gave me so much love, it was precious.  I had been reading the Tao of Equus by Linda Kohanov which is an incredible book about the spiritual and healing power of horses.

http://eponaquest.com/

Equine Assisted Psychotherapy is a therapeutic modality. The horses facilitate psychotherapeutic change by interacting with people.  Equine Assisted Psychotherapy (EAP) incorporates horses experientially for emotional growth and learning. It is a collaborative effort between a licensed mental health therapist, a horse professional, and horses working together with the client(s) in order to address the treatment goals.

“Why horses? Why not other animals?”

Horses are large and powerful, which creates a natural opportunity for some to overcome fear and develop confidence. The size and power of the horse are naturally intimidating to many people. Accomplishing a task involving a horse and overcoming those fears creates confidence and provides for wonderful metaphors when dealing with other intimidating and challenging situations in life.

Horses have the ability to mirror exactly what human body language is telling them. Many people will complain, “The horse is stubborn; the horse doesn’t like me; the horse is just like XXX;” etc. But the lesson to be learned may be that if they change what they are doing or how they are feeling within themselves, the horses will respond differently toward them. Horses are honest, which makes them especially powerful messengers. Horses respond immediately to behaviors, therefore appropriate consequences are received by the client(s). Horses are not judgmental—they respond consistently to what is shown to them.

http://www.horsescare.org/index.php

Move From Fear and Towards Love

with Anna Twinney & Melisa Pearce    

Wednesday, June 5th,
6:00pm MT 

(8:00 pm EST, 5:00 pm PST)

FREE webinar! 


REGISTER NOW!

https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/408259298

Melisa and Anna met through their participation as contributing authors in the book Horse as Teacher, a Path to Authenticity. Discovering the commonality in their interpretation of horses and humans they have begun to work more closely together and today collaborate on several projects.

During this webinar Melisa and Anna will discuss and share how horses interpret our fear, their natural response and how they lead humans away from it when understood. Melisa will share about her experiences with horses claire-sentient abilities that she sees everyday as she partners with horses who emotionally heal humans through her Equine Gestalt process. Anna will be sharing as a Natural horse trainer who has traveled the world working with and studying horses behavior. She will share how they are effected in ways you may not even be aware of when you are working with them and what you can watch for with your horse.

www.touchedbyahorse.com

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Now this wolf sanctuary also was shown and looks like a wonderful place for the wolves and other animals who live there.  They are located in the high desert in southern California (Lucerne Valley).
When you look into the eyes of a wolf, you see your soul . . .
 

Visit Wolf Mountain Sanctuary and sing with the wolves…

http://www.wolfmountain.com/Visit%202011.htm

Similar to the pit bulls and parolees concept, this sanctuary works with military veterans and wolves.

http://www.warriorsandwolves.org

 

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Pit Bulls and Addicts

been enjoying the new season of Pit Bulls and Parolees…now that they have moved to New Orleans…

https://www.facebook.com/PitBullsandParolees/app_378878488848240

last night, there was an inspiring new show on afterwards, Addicts & Animals...

Addicts & Animals’ hero, Phil Aguilar, aka “Chief,” has made it his mission to help drug addicts, but he does it his way. He and his family run an in-home sobriety program that uses the responsibility and joy of pet ownership as a means for recovery. Once a heroine addict himself, Chief swoops up addicts from the doorsteps of Hell and helps them get their lives back, with the help of a few tail-wagging companions.

He rescues death row dogs/shelter dogs… which is very cool…and each addict, when ready, gets to take care of a dog.

Healing Trauma

The relationship between humans and pets has always been a close, cherished bond. Animals have a magical way of easing stress and relieving strain for individuals in need – even drug addicts. Research suggests that the hormones activated by drug abuse are also elevated by animal contact. Dopamine and serotonin levels increase with drugs like cocaine and heroin; the same feel good hormones increase from healthy activities, like taking care of a dog.

Health benefits of having a pet include:
• Lowers blood pressure
• Reduces stress
• Fights depressions

Animal-assisted therapy is being used in a wide variety of settings to help people with acute and chronic illnesses. This is based on the many physiological and psychological benefits documented in patients during interactions with animals. These include lowered blood pressure and heart rate, increased beta-endorphin levels, decreased stress levels, reduced feelings of anger, hostility, tension and anxiety, improved social functioning, and increased feelings of empowerment, trust, patience and self-esteem. Animal therapy is looked upon as both a learning and healing experience.

How can animals help with addiction? There is more than one reason for utilizing animals to help in addiction recovery.

The first reason is that animals like dogs and horses exhibit total emotional honesty, something that addicts need to learn themselves. A horse, for example, will show signs of fear when afraid, aggression when angry, exploration when curious, rather than trying to conceal these emotions in any way.

In addition, animals like horses reflect our emotions. If we are anxious near them, they will be anxious also. If we are relaxed, they will relax as well. This kind of feedback is especially helpful for addicts who are working on getting more in tune with what they feel. An addict may not be aware that he is feeling particularly tense, for example, when working with a horse. But the horse’s unease may alert him to that fact. The addict can then respond by concentrating on relaxing.

Horses are large and somewhat intimidating animals. How an addict responds to and behaves around the horse can tell an addictions therapist a lot about how this person interacts in other relationships. For example, someone who is aggressive, in personal relationships, will generally demonstrate the same behavior when working with a horse.

Another addict who is shy, reserved, or afraid to speak her mind will usually have a very difficult time setting boundaries with a horse. The horse will learn to respect those who earn it, and weak requests will not get that respect from a horse.

The horse is therefore a great teacher of assertiveness, the midpoint between aggression and passivity. A horse will often respond in fear or refused cooperation to aggression. They will generally ignore passive requests. Somewhere in the middle is assertiveness, the ability of the addict to be clear and honest about what he needs, without being overbearing.

Outside of therapy, animals can help a person in recovery cope with stress. Animal studies regularly demonstrate that the mere presence in the home of a dog or cat can lower a person’s blood pressure. Just petting a dog or cat can decrease heart rate, respiratory rate, and other symptoms of stress.

With stress being so imperative for addicts in recovery to manage, having a pet can be a big help in the recovery process. Pets can also help addicts work on service and compassion, as they learn to care for and love an animal that is dependent upon them for support. All of these benefits make animals an important addition to recovery.

As an adjunct to more traditional types of addiction treatment, animal-assisting therapy works by helping those who have been battling the demons of substance abuse find a way to step outside of themselves and discover deeper meaning and purpose by providing vital assistance to other living creatures who desperately need love and companionship. For animals and recovering addicts alike, animal-assisting therapy is a win-win situation.
Acts of kindness and selflessness by their very nature put us in contact with the best of ourselves, and this can make them incredibly valuable for recovering addicts who spent so many years selfishly putting their own needs above those of everyone else. Addicts and alcoholics repeatedly use and manipulate people in order to satisfy their desire for relief from the symptoms of addiction, and besides their need to detoxify their bodies they also need to cleanse their wounded spirits to remove the contamination left behind by their self-centered and abusive past behaviors.
Animal-assisting therapy can help even the most broken and jaded person rediscover his or her deepest inner sources of compassion, which is an essential step for any addict who hopes to finally ascend from the pit of despair and shame that dominated his or her existence for so long. Before those with a history of substance abuse can hope to find lasting sobriety, they must first rebuild their self-esteem to the point where they actually feel strong enough to accomplish difficult things and worthy enough to deserve the happiness and peace that was denied them during their years of battling against alcoholism or drug addiction.
Animal-assisting therapy is all about fixing bodies, minds, and souls that have been damaged by abuse and neglect. Above all else, recovering addicts and alcoholics need something new and worthwhile to live for, and a commitment to caring for animals who have been cast aside can provide vital meaning and purpose where before there was only dependency and hopelessness.

Therapy dogs, like Peaches the pit bull pictured above, typically work with their owners in hospitals, nursing homes, schools and rehabilitation centers. They play with abused children, give affection to the elderly, help the critically ill to laugh and forget their pain for a while, and sometimes provide a warm lick to wipe the tears away.  The presence of dogs provides a sense of normalcy and reassurance to troubled individuals. Acceptance and non-judgment are perhaps the two most important gifts that these animals can offer. To dogs, humans are “perfect” just the way we are.

Shame, guilt, secrecy and hopelessness create a fertile ground for self-loathing, despair and an abnormal fear response. In an environment where people have proven to not be trustworthy – or, in the addict’s case if they cannot trust themselves – trained therapy dogs can potentially bridge the gap and make a difference in one’s recovery.

Benefits:

  • Stabilized and Improve social skills by learning gentle ways to communicate and handle the animal, such as feeding and grooming.
  • Brighten affect, mood, pleasure and affection while playing with the animal.
  • Reduce abusive behavior and learn appropriate touch.
  • Improve ability to express feelings by identifying how an animal might feel in a certain situation and/or recalling a client’s history with pets (sharing stories of grief or funny events).
  • Reduce anxiety and fear by forming a bond of love and comfort with the animal.
  • Learn how to better communicate with people by talking to the animal.
  • Develop a cooperative plan to accomplish something with the animal.

Cynthia Chandler, author of Animal Assisted Therapy in Counseling, points out that the positive benefits to be gained from therapy can be more immediate when a therapy pet is involved, especially when working with a resistant client. The desire to be with the therapy pet can sometimes override the client’s initial defenses (Chandler, 2005). She further points to the natural relationship that occurs between dogs and humans which can result in quick bonding and trust between the client and dog in a therapeutic setting. According to Chandler, this bond between the pet and the client also helps to facilitate a bond with the therapist, as the feelings of affection and trust for the pet are eventually transferred to the pet’s therapist. Screening is required for clients in recovery who have a history of violence, animal abuse, animal phobias or allergies. However, most clients and pets will benefit from this type of therapy (Chandler, 2005).

According to Dr. Joseph Volpicelli and the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), “20 million Americans suffer from alcohol abuse disorders, yet only about 2 million are in any kind of treatment program.”

Stories of getting sober and being aided in staying sober fill the halls of AA and other recovery centers, and now, with the expansion of the field of AAT, perhaps the use of animals at treatment centers will one day become commonplace.

Love is considered by many to be the universal healer. Is it any less comforting if the source is not human? According to a study done at the Waltham Center for Pet Nutrition in Leicestershire, England, a pet’s love can help reduce anxiety, lower blood pressure and triglyceride levels, moderate the effects of stress, and build a sense of empathy. Love creates a bond that undeniably aids in the health, happiness and a sense of belonging that makes life worth living (Meunier, 2003). These nurturing qualities can easily be translated into a treatment plan for a recovering addict.

Imagine all of the shelter animals that can be saved and given new life/loving homes when more animals are utilized to help people recover from addiction, illnesses, war, trauma and injuries, PTSD and more…

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/21134540/vp/40471379#40471379

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Filed under adoption, all you need is a dog, All you need is love, animal planet, animal rescue, belly rubs, cats, dog training, doggie healing center, dogs, horses, K9 approved, K9 travel, keep pets safe, love, pet adoption, pet rescue organizations, pit bull, self help, true love, Uncategorized

social butterfly dogs

  1. Bernese Mountain Dog
  2. Briard
  3. Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
  4. Cockapoo (Cockapoodle)
  5. Coton de Tulear
  6. Goldador
  7. Golden Retriever
  8. Goldendoodle
  9. Harrier
  10. Havanese
  11. Irish Setter
  12. Labradoodle
  13. Labrador Retriever
  14. Petit Basset Griffon Vendeen
  15. Puggle

According to Rachael Ray’s pet blog, the above are the dog friendliest dogs… is your dog the social butterfly of dogs, very friendly to other dogs?  is it one of the above or another breed?  Do dogs of a feather stick together?

Cici has played with more than 600 dogs of all kinds of breeds … her favs tend to be Golden retrievers, labs, German Shepherds, Boxers, Labradoodles, Australian Shepherd, Border Collies (BIG dogs) AND she has best lil pals too, mini poodles, tiny terriers, and other breeds.   She has issues with bull dogs of all types for some reason. She used to have issues with other pit bull terriers but has had a few pit bull puppy friends, too.  Depends upon the individual dogs.

http://blog.rachaelray.com/index.php/2011/03/10/dog-friendly-dogs/

plus, she has met/sniffed/chased or stalked bees, birds, bugs, bunny rabbits, cats, chickens, chipmunks, cows, deer, ducks, elk, fish, geese, goats, horses, lizards, llamas, peacocks, sheep, skunks, squirrels, wild turkeys, yaks, and zebras…

and she LOVES kids… the other day she played with a bunch of kids at the neighborhood park playground, licking them, showing off her belly, the kids were on the swings, she was a bit leery of the swings, but she ran and chased and raced with the girls and they enjoyed playing with her.  She wanted to stay and play all day.

what other farm animals or other pets does your dog play with?

Today is saturday, sheeeesh, where does the weeks go?  So fast. Maybe it’s the rain which is pouring again. And of course, Japan, do not pass by this blog without checking out what you can do for Japan (last blog post). Do not pass go, do not collect $200…

Anyway, since it is Saturday, Pet Blogger’s Hop, jump aboard another Blog Hop and thanks to Life with Dogs, here is the code…

enter at your own risk of having FUN…

 

As you hop around, don’t forget to stop by the first three entries on the list, our hosts: Confessions of the Plume, Two Little Cavaliers and Life with Dogs.

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Filed under big dogs welcome, breeds, bugs, bunny rabbits, cats, chickens, cows, deer, dog parks, dogs, farm animals, goat, horses, keep pets safe, llamas, mutts, nanny dogs, pit bull, Rachael Ray, sheep, skunk