Tag Archives: pit bulls

Happy Dog Bite Prevention Week

The quiz was compiled by Dog Bite Prevention Coalition members — the Postal Service, American Veterinary Medical Assn., American Humane, Insurance Information Institute and State Farm Insurance.

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Dog Safety Quiz

1. Is it okay to open a door and let dogs out when a letter carrier drops off mail? Yes OR No

Answer: NO
If a letter carrier delivers mail or packages to your front door, place your dog into a separate room and close the door before opening the front door. Dog owners should remind their children about the need to keep the family dog secured. Parents should remind their children not to take mail directly from letter carriers in the presence of the family pet as the dog may see handing mail to a child as a threatening gesture.

2. Does an angry dog wag his tail? Yes OR No

Answer: YES
People often assume that a dog with a wagging tail is a friendly dog, but this is far from the truth. Dogs wag their tails for numerous reasons, including when they’re feeling aggressive. A tail that is held high and moves stiffly is a sign that the dog is feeling dominant, aggressive, or angry.

3. Do dogs like to be kissed and hugged? Yes OR No

Answer: NO
We humans like to touch and hug people and things when we express happiness. Dogs don’t. Some dogs are very tolerant and will allow hugging and kissing while some try to get away. A dog may tolerate or even enjoy a hug on his terms, but sometimes he will not be in the mood. Think about it, when hugging a person you wrap your arms around the other and hold them in place for a few seconds. That alone is bad news to a dog since they on average do not do well with restrain. They generally don’t like to be held in place. This alone is enough to generate feelings of anxiety as well as a sense of unease and insecurity in your dog.

4. If you know a dog, is it okay to reach through a car window or a fence to pet it? Yes OR No

Answer: NO
Dogs, even ones you know have good days and bad days. You should never pet a dog without asking the owner first and especially if it is through a window or fence. For a dog, this makes them feel like you are intruding on their space and could result in the dog biting you.

5. If a dog is chasing you, should you try to run away? Yes OR No

Answer: NO
Never run from a dog! The dog may think you are playing a game and start chasing you if you begin to run away. Don’t shout or wave your arms as this will either encourage or frighten the dog. Remain calm and still and talk to the dog using a soft voice. Loud, angry-sounding words and screaming only make the dog nervous and upset.

6. Is it important to ask an owner for permission before you pet their dog? Yes OR No

Answer: YES
ALWAYS even if it is a dog you know!
 First get the “OK” from the owner.
 Hold out your hand, fingers closed, palm down, slowly toward the dog. Allow the dog to approach your hand and sniff it.

 Wait for the dog’s “OK.” If he wants your affection, he will lower his head, perk ears, or even come closer to you. If the dogs puts his ears back, flat on his head, or growls, or cowers, don’t pet him!
 Pat the dog on the top of his head, or along his back. Avoid touching his belly, tail, ears, or feet.

7. Is it okay to pet a dog while it is eating? Yes OR No

Answer: NO
Do not try to take food or toy away from a dog. NEVER bother a dog while he is eating. The most common situation where a dog bite occurs is while a dog is eating because they are protecting their source of food.

8. Is it okay to hit or yell at your dog if it doesn’t listen to you? Yes OR No

Answer: NO
When we hit or yell at a dog, we are applying pain and scaring the dog. For dogs, a natural reaction to being hurt or frightened is to bite. A fearful dog doesn’t trust people and can lead to aggression.

9. Is a scared dog as dangerous as an angry dog? Yes OR No

Answer: YES
When animals and people are afraid of something, they prefer to get away from that thing. They try to defend themselves from the scary thing. An angry dog is just as dangerous as a dog that is afraid because both will be defensive and bite.

10. Are there only certain breeds (or types) of dogs that bite? Yes OR No

Answer: NO
ALL DOGS are capable of biting. There’s no one breed or type of dog that’s more likely to bite than others. Biting has more to do with circumstances, behavior, and training.

11. Do dogs use their body to tell you how they feel? Yes OR No

Answer: YES
Dogs have a language that allows them to communicate their emotional state and their intentions to others around them. Although dogs do use sounds and signals, much of the information that they send is through their body language, specifically their facial expressions and body postures. You can tell how a dog is feeling (sad, tired, happy, angry, scared) by looking at the position of a dogs’ ears, mouth, eyes, and tail.

12. Does a good dog owner leave his dog chained up outside all day? Yes OR No

Answer: NO
Dogs are social animals who crave human companionship. That’s why they thrive and behave better when living indoors with their pack — their human family members. Dogs that are tied up or chained outside are frustrated and can become aggressive because they are unhappy. They can also become very afraid because when they are tied or chained up, they can’t escape from things that scare them.

 

*****

Because of Breed Specific Ban Laws in the UK Sir Patrick Stewart known for his role on Star Trek cannot adopt a sweet adorable dog named Ginger who needs a home.  He and the dog bonded when he fostered her in the USA. Yeah she looks very dangerous, kissing and slobbering all over his face.

 

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http://www.express.co.uk/celebrity-news/790551/Dangerous-Dogs-Act-Patrick-Stewart-RSPCA-prevent-adoption-PITBULL

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Filed under animals, dog friendly, dog kisses, dog quiz, dog speak, dog travel, dogs, pit bull, Uncategorized

Best Friends Redux

in town, Kanab, Utah, there are some new chain hotels that are pet friendly such as Comfort suites, Holiday inn, and Hampton inn with pet fees of $10 or twenty per pet per night and also a few others that are not chains such as Parry lodge, which also has a coffee shop. if you are visiting Best friends, it is easier to get around by staying right in kanab. there are other properties that are twenty or thirty miles away. these are pet friendly but then you have to drive forty to sixty miles a day, if you are volunteering.

 

The prices from April until September, high season, are higher than at other times of the year. The weather in the summer can be very humid and hot. Cici and I visited during mid-March and it is already in the 80’s, the prices are not so high and there are not as many tourists, although as we drove through Zion, it was pretty filled up and crowded with hikers.

 

Please call the Best Friends Welcome Center at 435-644-2001, ext. 4537 or email them at welcomecenter@bestfriends.org  and ask to be scheduled on a tour.

Tour times are:
8:30 a.m.10 a.m.,  1 p.m.  or  2:30 p.m.

 

I asked about the rest of the Vicktory Dogs who are still there. The Welcome Center does include info about them during the tour.

This is what I was told.
“One of them is court-ordered to stay here for life and the other three  have special circumstances that make it likely that they will live out their lives here which is just fine with their caregivers who love them. The Vicktory Dogs who are still here are not comfortable with strangers so actually meeting the dogs isn’t possible. Mya and Curly are extremely shy. Next January will be the 10th anniversary of their arrival here. So time is marching on. Out of the 22 who came to Best Friends, we are happy that 13 of them were able to be adopted.”

 

 

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http://bestfriends.org/donate/sponsor-an-animal/curly

 

http://bestfriends.org/stories-blog-videos/latest-news/vicktory-dogs-nine-years-later

 

I also visited the little store that BFAS has in town because they had a sign that said cat cuddling. i WAS game.  there were only two cats in there but one of them reminded me of my baby boy Abundance, a black cat with some white on his chest and paws. Had not expected that. Touched my heart.

 

Also got to spend some time chatting with Kevin Johnson, now retired, who used to work at BFAS, his wife still does. They adopted Ray one of the V-dogs, who passed a couple of years ago. Now they have three other pit bulls, Bosco, Bubba and Turtle and numerous parrots and a cat. Each have their own challenges. We shared pit bull stories and specific instances of dogs and love and opportunities of being a guardian of the furry creatures. Of course, Cici slobbered all over Kevin’s legs and showed off her belly.

 

 

 

 

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Filed under animals, Best Friends, best friends animal sanctuary, dog travel, dogs, Michael Vick dogs, pet travel, pit bull, Uncategorized

Top 3 Dog daddies

This Sunday is Father’s Day. A good dad is one who truly loves his kids, furry ones, too. And he spends time with them, taking care of them, training and having fun. We are inspired by these three dog dads.

 

Here are our top 3 picks for awesome dog daddies.

 

  1. Roo Yori

Running to the rescue, Andrew Yori made man’s best friend proud! ‪#‎K9Ninja‬ ‪#‎AmericanNinjaWarrior‬  Cici and I were very excited to see Roo on the show. Dog dad to Wallace, world champion frisbee dog and Hector, former Vick dog (both dogs are now over the Rainbow Bridge), Angus, Mindy and founder of a pit bull rescue foundation named after Wallace, Roo just appeared on the TV show American Ninja Warrior and qualified for the next round. He encourages people to adopt dogs from shelters. Wallace was an unwanted shelter dog once upon a time and Roo and Clara took a chance on him and it worked out great.

 

https://www.facebook.com/NBCNinjaWarrior/?fref=nf

 

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2.  Paul: Cherry Garcia’s dog dad

Cherry, another former Vick dog, was quite traumatized when he was adopted by his parents. And he has absolutely blossomed in their loving care.

 

What has surprised you most about him?

One of the most surprising things to us is we really thought Cherry would get to a certain point in his rehabilitation and settle in and not change much after that. What we have found is Cherry continuously grows and overcomes the next obstacle in his way. It will be a lifelong journey for him, and he has days where he regresses, but eventually he moves forward. It has been an incredible journey watching him go from a dog who slept with his eyes open to a dog that we can call “normal.” We know that isn’t the most exciting term, but that’s all he wants to be, a normal dog.

The other thing we have found really surprising about Cherry is that stress helps him learn and move forward. We all saw Cherry on “DogTown” and how shutdown he was. We didn’t have a plan of how to handle his fame, but we weren’t going to put him through public events if they didn’t help him. The first event we took him to was a small, kids-only event. He was stressed to the max, and we stayed a couple of hours b

When we got home that night, Cherry took to his normal routine with much more confidence than we had ever seen. He was so full of himself. We thought, “Hmm … maybe this is a tool we can use to help him progress.” We were right!”

 

HECherrySnuggling

 

http://bestfriends.org/stories-blog-videos/latest-news/cherry-vicktory-dog

 

3. Jon Stewart

Long time pit bull advocate, he even adopted a three-legged dog named Champ. When he did The Daily Show, the office was dog friendly. When he retired from the show, he and his wife Tracey bought a 13 acre farm in New Jersey. They provide homes for formally abused farm animals.

 

http://moomah.com/themagazine/virtual-adoption

 

Happy Father’s Day !!!!

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Filed under adoption, Adventure, Best Friends, best friends animal sanctuary, big dogs welcome, dog friendly, dog movies/TV, dogs, farm animals, pit bull, Uncategorized

It is the pits and not the pits

did it all begin with dogs?

the rancor, recrimination, disdain, and discrimination,

small versus large dogs.

breed discrimination.

breed bans.

BSL.

talk to any owner of a German Shepherd, Rottweiler, or pit bull (which is not a breed, a bunch of bully breeds including American Pit Bull Terrier, American Staffordshire Terrirer, Pit Bull Terrier, and others) are lumped together and called pit bulls, and they will tell you about how their dog(s) are vilified, demonized, shunned, and/or called mean, vicious and/or killer dogs, no matter the dog.

is it any wonder then now we have right here in America:

people

red vs blue

GOP vs Democrats

conservatives vs liberals

Bernie supporters versus Hillary

men versus women

white Christian evangelicals aka white supremacists against everyone

heterosexuals against LGBT folks

white people versus nonwhite people

rich versus poor and middle class

1% versus 99%

housed versus unhoused

child molesters and rapists versus transgendered

environmentalists aka tree huggers versus climate change deniers and oil companies, big pharma and nuke, coal, industries

vegetarians and vegans versus meat eaters

war mongers versus pacifists

north versus south

didn’t we fight this war before, I seem to recall something…

people divided

a nation in crisis 

fighting each other and the whole world

when will we learn the lessons and stop blaming one another, pointing fingers, spewing hatred?

it is not the dogs, not the people…

 

a nation gone mad accusing one another for our problems

 

we are NOT NOT NOT going to solve anything with slurs, epithets, walls and bans

 

can we just agree to disagree and MOVEO N?????

 

****

 

on a different note, Cici and I are traveling and met with Howard Epstein in LA for lunch yesterday. It was fun and yummy and we grew up in the same neighborhood in NYC, went to the same high school at different times.

 

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Mean dogs and “locking jaws”

I had started this blog post before two things happened. Yesterday, my dog went missing for five hours. And an article in Newsweek about pit bulls.

Because my dog is a pit bull mix and I know that some people hate blocky headed bully dogs, besides becoming frantic and worried and searching all over tarnation for her, I had the additional concerns that she could have been hurt, abused, shot on sight, and / or killed in a shelter because of the way she looks. She may or may not even be part American Pit Bull Terrier, have not had her DNA tested. I know she is part Dalmatian and looks and acts like an APBT. Anyway, the point is that I had someone tell me that she could have been picked up to be used as a bait dog or sold by druggies to dog fighters. I was half out of my head when she finally surfaced because of these concerns and it was also getting dark.

 

I think what actually happened is that someone spooked her. I hope that they did not hurt her. She stayed underneath someone’s camper for five hours. That is not normal behavior for my dog. I had taken her over to a neighbor’s camper to cheer the neighbor up. Cici loves this woman and I had taken her over there before yesterday. I will not take her over there again because when I went back to get her, the woman did not even know that Cici was missing, nor did she even come over to apologize to me, nor help me and others look for her.

Lost Dogs 

By the way, I did remember to Call Home Again, to let them know that she was lost. They will contact all local authorities for you with the dog’s photo and microchip info and will let you know if anyone has found the dog. Good service. And I asked all the neighbors I could find and asked for their help. And as I drove around, I asked everyone I could see and talk to if they saw my dog.  I also asked my online friends to pray, send good thoughts, vibes, send Cici and me light, for her to be found safe and sound before dark, asap. And a bunch of doggie mamas responded favorably to being asked and shared the news. A whole bunch of networking paid off.

 

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A Yorkie and an Aussie Shepherd and a pit bull, really?

Ok, now onto the Newsweek article. Read it if you will.

Here are my comments about it:

http://www.newsweek.com/pit-bulls-label-shelters-study-441318

I appreciate the overall stop labeling all dogs as pit bulls and leaving them in shelters. I do however want to clear up a couple of important things.

1. There are more like 20 breeds that can be labeled pit bull including mastiffs, pit bull terriers, the ones you mentioned and more.

2. The myth about locking jaws is a terrible myth. Talk to any vet or dog expert or dog owner, even.

It is a myth that keeps the dogs banned and deemed dangerous, scary, mean and vicious. Dog fighters and others who get their macho on from training dogs to be mean love these types of myths but the people who really love dogs and pit bulls know this is just a bunch of dangerous hype.

Not true, no such mechanism as a locking jaw. I know personally. I have opened up my dog’s mouth when she was latched onto something and did not want to let go. Terriers can be very stubborn and persistent. When they want something, they want it. And I have even stuck my hands into her mouth to get something out of there that she did not want to let go of. Like a child’s saying NO NO NO, this is a canine’s way of saying No, I want this and I am not going to let go of it. No locking jaw mechanism, just a stubborn terrier.

By the way, I emailed Newsweek with my comments and also commented on their Twitter.  Google them and let them know what you think.

 

My comment to Newsweek paid off, here it is:

Hello Sue,

Thank you so much for your comment on my article. I deleted the part about locked jaws and added a correction at the bottom of the article saying that locked jaws are a myth. The last thing I want is to make dogs labeled as pit bulls appear dangerous or scary in any way.

For your comment on other breeds labeled as pit bulls, I didn’t say that the three breeds I mentioned were the only breeds labeled as pit bulls, just that they are the most commonly labeled breeds. So a correction won’t be necessary, but thank you for the information. Hopefully one day we won’t have any breed labels.

Thank you,

Morgan Mitchell

Newsweek Magazine

 

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Cici 2

 

Mean dogs and dog bites / attacks

Below is what dog experts know to be red flags that can lead to dog bites / attacks.

Dog experts agree that the most dangerous types of dogs include:

1.  unfixed (not spayed, not neutered)

2. unsocialized and untrained (dogs left chained up 24/7 and not part of the family)

3. abused (dogs treated cruelly, hurt physically, verbally and / or used in unhealthy ways*)

4. sick (a dog that is hurt or sick)

5. mamas with puppies (watch out for mamas guarding their babies)

6. roaming in packs (dogs roaming the streets with no human guardian)

7. left alone with children (NEVER leave a dog alone with a child, NEVER)

8. an unknown dog (a dog that is not known to you). Get to know the dog slowly, through a fence, perhaps or with the owner/guardian.

LISTEN Up if the owner/guardian of a dog says that their dog is mean or vicious or whatever, BELIEVE THEM. They KNOW their dog, so BEWARE.

Please notice that in NONE of the above scenarios are breeds mentioned. Because ANY dog can be mean, vicious, attack or bite another dog or a human being. And statistics show that the dogs that do bite and / or attack are dogs in any and all of the categories shown above.

This is why Breed Specific Legislation does not work because bans and BSL target various breeds of dogs. And it is not because a dog is a certain breed that a dog bites or attacks. It is because of the red flag factors above. There can also be genetic imbalances and chemistry in dogs that make them react or respond in vicious ways (born with a defect).

*Dogs that are overbred, used in dog fighting, used as bait dogs and other such cases can be put into the abused category).

 

Better to be safe than sorry. Evaluate each dog on an individual basis and know dog’s body language and the red flags above. These will enable you to be responsible, prepared and able to prevent dog bites and attacks. Please share and educate others.

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True life example:

A very small dog with a mean disposition who barks, growls and snaps at other dogs got a lesson the other day when she approached the wrong dog, a larger dog, a dog that was not playing. The larger dog taught that small dog a lesson and the owner was very glad because his dog was cruising for a bruising and he knew it.

 

Now hopefully the small dog will think twice before snapping, growling and showing off her mean attitude to larger dogs (and maybe other dogs in general? one can only hope).

 

 

 

 

 

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Victory dogs film: The Champions

If the names Cherry Garcia, Handsome Dan, Little Red, Ginger Girl, Lucas, Georgia, Mel, Ray, Hector (the Inspector), Jhumpa Jones, Audie, Frodo, Leo, Red, Stella, and others (52) are familiar to you, then you know who we are talking about when we discuss the Victory dogs (the formerly abused dogs of Michael Vick’s Bad Newz Kennels) who are now either in loving homes or remain at Best Friends Animal Sanctuary in Kanab, Utah (22 of the most traumatized dogs went to Best Friends originally). Ten of the most adoptable dogs were taken care of, socialized, and trained by Donna and Tim of BadRap in Oakland, CA who helped to find them great loving homes. Some have become therapy dogs. Others are just plain happy in homes with kids, other dogs and cats. And some have passed on (Hector, Leo, Red, Lucas, Georgia and others).

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Now their story is being told in “The Champions,” a new documentary created by Darcy Dennett, which just made its world premier over the weekend at the Hamptons International Film Festival (HIFF), which for the first time ever featured a “Compassion, Justice & Animal Rights” program for filmmakers who want to share stories that will change the world and, hopefully, our relationship with animals for the better.

From the film’s synopsis:

The documentary The Champions, follows five of the dogs, from the time they are first rescued through their adoption. It is not just about the dogs themselves, but how they change and inspire the people who come into their lives.  It also follows-up with six dogs who remain at Best Friends to this day, some of them for life.  Thanks to the work of Best Friends and BADRAP, dozens of the dogs who would have summarily been killed were given a second chance to prove that even fighting dogs rescued from the most extreme circumstances can be successfully rehabilitated with love, time, and patience.  That in fact, what many of these dogs need to thrive isn’t rehabilitation at all, but time to recover.

Today, a majority of the dogs have successfully been placed into loving, adoptive homes.  Their story proves that even creatures who have suffered the most unimaginable abuse have amazing strength, spirit, and resilience. It is a story of the bonds of trust and love we have with animals and their importance in our lives, a relationship that has the potential to bring out the best in the human and animal spirit.

The film also touches on something that continues to hurt pit bulls and their families in general: breed discrimination. Hopefully it will help continue to dispel the myths that surround these dogs and open the hearts and minds of more people who will stop fearing and targeting them based on stereotypes.

The film trailer has premiered and is on the web site. Check it out!

The Champions

The Champions, which won the annual Zelda Penzel “Giving Voice to the Voiceless Award” at HIFF this year, will be screening at select locations throughout the U.S. over the coming weeks. For more info, check out The Champions.

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Foster a Dog

 

Fostering is one piece of the NO Kill equation

“We all grew up believing that if you worked at a humane society or an SPCA, it was because you loved animals. And we were also told that the killing was a necessary evil and that nobody wanted to do it. And they wouldn’t do it if there was any sort of alternative… But then when the San Francisco SPCA created an alternative model and showed them that, indeed it wasn’t a ’necessary’ evil, it was just evil and we could end it, [the sheltering establishment] didn’t want to hear about it, they didn’t want to know and they felt so tremendously threatened by it that they did everything in their power to try and stop it.” –Jennifer Winograd, No Kill Advocacy Center, in the film Redemption.

http://www.nokillredemption.com/

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Screenings:

“America is two countries now—the country of its narrative and the country of its numbers, with the latter sitting in judgment of the former. In the stories we tell ourselves, we are nearly always too good: too soft on criminals, too easy on terrorists, too lenient with immigrants, too kind to animals. In the stories told by our numbers, we imprison, we drone, we deport, and we euthanize with an easy conscience and an avenging zeal. We have become schizophrenic in that way, and pit bulls hold up the same mirror as the 2.2 million souls in our prisons and jails and the more than 350,000 people we deport every year. Every year, American shelters* kill about 1.2 million dogs. But both pro- and anti-pit-bull organizations estimate that of these, anywhere from 800,000 to nearly 1 million are pit bulls. We kill anywhere from 2,000 to 3,000 pit bulls a day. They are rising simultaneously in popularity and disposability, becoming something truly American, a popular dog forever poised on the brink of extermination.”

http://www.esquire.com/features/american-dog-0814?src=soc_fcbks

* the No Kill community would argue that we do not HAVE to kill. Some shelters CHOOSE to do so.  Nathan Winograd suggests and has himself implemented the No Kill Equation as the head of a shelter (or two) where he took killing off the table of options and challenged his staff to come up with creative solutions to get pets adopted.

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Can fostering pets save more shelter pets?

Rock and Rawhide thinks so.

There is an estimated 3-4million pets euthanized each year in US animal shelters. That’s 10,000 per day on average. There must be a way to curb at least some of this. There is. Fostering.

There is a strong lack of homes willing to open their doors to fostering a shelter pet. Maybe it’s because they assume that a shelter animal is “broken”, or that they think they would never be able to give the animal up to an adopter, it would break their heart. The former could not be further from the truth. And the latter is selfish. Imagine the heart exploding with happiness that the beautiful pet you have supported and loved, has found forever love with a great family.

Many shelter animals are down on their luck, and need a second chance. They have lived in homes before, they have lived with children, other pets, and life was great! But perhaps their human passed away, or maybe they fell on hard times and just couldn’t afford pet care any longer. And now Muffy or Fluffy or Spike or Spot is sitting in a cage wondering what on earth happened. Sure, there are some shelter pets who sadly have never felt love, or the affection of a human before. Some were abused or neglected. But all of them still have hope, they wag their tails, they purr.

One thing they all have in common is the dangerous waiting game. Will they get sick in the shelter? Will they go crazy if they are there too long? Will they gain bad behaviors because they are not receiving the natural love, attention and comforts that a home should provide? Will they make it out alive at all?

How the animals end up in the shelter in the first place is a societal problem that we alone cannot fix. But if people opened their homes to shelter pets we could save a bunch of lives and help animals transition into forever homes much more easily. That at least would be a start till our society puts a higher value on the lives and existence of our furry friends, till the law stands up for our four-legged buddies, till shelters are no longer overflowing with the unwanted.

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Fostering is a wonderful experience. As a foster parent, you can set certain guidelines with the rescue group as to what type of animal you prefer. A certain breed, age, sex, temperament, that you think will fit into your home. If you work full time and already have a dog, you can always request a dog-friendly foster pet who is house-trained. You will have the full support of the rescue group. But you must also give them full support in return. You must make a minimum time commitment (some rescues require 3 months, some 6 months).

Your job as a foster is to guide the pet into being the best it can be, to get it ready y for a forever home. That could involve teaching a dog to stay off the couch or walk better on leash, or teaching a cat to welcome other pets or to play, or simply to teach trust and love.

For an adopter, it makes the process a little easier. There is less guessing. We are certainly not suggesting that potential adopters should shy away from shelters when making adoption decisions. We LOVE shelters and wish more people would consider adopting a pet direct from a shelter, instead of using it only as a dumping ground. But for some, they need to know more specifics that a shelter often times cannot provide. When a pet lives in a foster home, it has a better chance of showing its personality, of displaying more natural behaviors. An adoptee can be told if that pet likes children, what commands it knows, how it acts in a dog park, what its favorite game or pasttime is, how it is with car travel, what it acts like when strangers enter the home, whether it needs a home with adults only, etc. Some of these traits can be noted by a shelter, but to many the transition from shelter directly to home is one that results in many adopters returning pets.

A pet needs time to decompress, to learn trust, to “get over” the shelter experience. This may be easy for some pets, and not so easy for others. A patient and loving foster home can help them through this process. Each rescue group is different with the type of support it offers it fosters. Some pay for all medical bills, some even pay for food. But all are ready with any help and advice they can provide. The rescue will promote the pet on social media and it’s website, as well as on sites such as PetFinder.com. If appropriate, the pet would also be part of adoption events where the general public can visit the pet. It is always helpful if the foster also promotes the pet to their contacts. They are the best ambassador for that pet.

One example of a wonderful dog that would flourish in a foster home is Millie. She was on the kill list in NYC and was pulled by A Pathway to Hope Rescue, after Rock & Rawhide advocated for her life. A great dog with so much potential, she is currently staying at A Hotel for Dogs in Middletown NJ, a doggie day care facility. She spent 2.5 months in the shelter, and now almost 1 month at the Hotel, where she is doing great. But it is time for Millie to find a home! Two-years-old, sweet, affectionate, listens to commands, obedient, healthy, loves to play, walks great on leash, and loves the car. Yet she’s just one of hundreds, actually one of thousands of dogs in boarding today. Lucky enough to have their lives saved. Unlucky enough that they are still in limbo….waiting.

Consider fostering. Consider adopting. Consider volunteering at your local animal shelter or rescue group. And always, hug your pets a little tighter, knowing they are the very lucky ones.

About Rock & Rawhide: Rock & Rawhide aims to increase adoptions and quality of life for dogs and cats in shelters, by providing distraction therapy and noise/stress reduction through the donations of toys, tough chew items, Kongs, Nylabones, bones, rawhides, blankets and more. If a dog is chewing, it’s not barking! If a cat is playing, it’s not meowing! Less noise = less stress. In turn, dogs and cats can pass their evaluations at shelters, and show more of their personality, making them more adoptable. We collect items through regular donations, music gigs, visual art shows, culinary events, DJ events, drop box programs, and more.


About A Pathway to Hope Rescue: A Pathway to Hope is dedicated to the rescue, rehabilitation and adoption of abandoned dogs and cats, with a special focus on south to north rescue of northern breed dogs, the rescue of stray cats, and community outreach to further the cause of rescue.


About Hotel For Dogs: Dedicated to providing your dog with only the very best in lodging, play, and love. An owner-operated facility, staffed by hard-working, energetic dog lovers. It’s not enough for us to simply provide your dog with a little space while you’re away. We want them wagging their tails, making new friends, and singing doggy farewells when you come to pick them up – because we’re dog owners too and we know how hard it is to leave them.

 

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