Tag Archives: whole foods market

Cookie monster with spots

my Cici can be pretty picky about her cookies. especially healthy ones. a  month or so ago, we were at a fair nearby Whole Foods and a local gal had a table. She baked her own dog biscuits and was giving out free samples. We chatted and i gave Cici a biscuit to try. She would not eat it. I tried again and still, she was not biting into those peanut butter and something cookies. I figured well, she just does not like peanut butter all that much. She’s more of a meat eating gal. Kind of embarrassing though.

Yesterday, we were at Whole Foods and these kind people there took Cici for a walk and gave her some dog treats of the non-healthy kind. She loved the dog bone shaped cookies while I worried about her eating them. I am currently giving her a special kind of SPIRULINA to counteract all of the bumps, cysts and growths that have recently developed all over her body. A vet wanted to surgically remove them but I prefer a more holistic method, hence the BIOPREP. More about this in a later blog post. Suffice it to say here, Cici has some health issues that we are addressing and that the Bioprep worked a few years ago to eliminate a growth on her toe.

well, NO SUCH PROBLEM with Austin and Kat CBD infused Wellness Dog Biscuits Peanut Butter and Apple. Cici has scarfed up these cookies with all of the enthusiasm of a happy cookie monster doggie. She thinks they are very tasty and I love that they are good for her.  shhhhhh, do not tell her that they are good for her.

 

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HOW CLEVER to pack a wellness punch into a doggie bite-sized snack. With no eggs, dairy, gluten or preservatives, these cookies offer oatmeal, coconut oil (CICI LOVES COCONUT OIL) and turmeric, a great anti-inflammatory and digestive aid. The organic, cold-pressed CBD Hemp oil is also an anti-inflammatory plus it supplies all of the good Omega 3, 6, 9 oils that doggies need.

And then there is cinnamon, maple, molasses, flax seed, probiotics, along with the oatmeal, apples and peanut butter. What a blend of goodness. No wheat or corn flour either, oat and rice flour and almond meal to hold these yummy for the tummy goodies all together.

https://www.austinandkat.com/pages/ingredients

i have rarely, if ever, seen my dog eat up cookies that were labeled healthy in any way like she has eaten these. She just doesn’t seem to enjoy the others but she is a big fan of Austin and Kat’s cookies and wishes there were an unlimited supply for her to eat.

 

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And here’s the kicker, initially, Kat, the creator baker of these sweet things initially made these cookies for her senior doggie, Brady. And Cici is no spring chicken at the ripe old age of 10 herself. Kat also has a puppy named Austin who has enjoyed the health benefits of these snacks, too. Read all about their journey in Maine here.

https://www.austinandkat.com/pages/who-are-we-and-how-it-started

And what are you waiting for, go get your doggies some treats. OK, Halloween is over but that’s ok. Now, it is time for some goodies for Thanksgiving and Christmas. Make great paw stocking stuffers. Be sure to tell Austin and Kat we sent you.

 

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Filed under allergies, dog training, dog travel, dog treats, gifts for your dog, healthy dog food, pet care, pet food, pet friendly dining, product review, Uncategorized

Easter treats 4 your pooch

Dog Breeds that are Good with Children

thanks to Martha Stewart for including staffies on this list…

Staffordshire Bull Terrier

The Staffordshire bull terrier is extremely courageous and obedient, highly intelligent, and affectionate with a sense of humor. This, coupled with its affection for its friends — children in particular — off-duty quietness, and trustworthy stability makes it an all-purpose dog. He looks forward to daily exercise, and his powerful jaws enjoy a supply of sturdy chew toys. While he is a sweet-tempered, affectionate dog, his strength and determination require an experienced owner who can work with him in a firm but gentle way. The staffie’s coat is short and smooth and needs only a quick brushing once a week.

http://www.marthastewart.com/274834/dog-breeds-good-with-children/@center/307037/dog-breeds-center?xsc=eml_pet_2012_04_04&om_rid=NsgvVu&om_mid=_BPfElWB8hoFOHT#/264833

she also has some fun, easy and interesting crafts to make as gifts to pets with kids including dog biscuits, a bunny gift basket, a dog can robot, pet ID tags and puppet animals

http://www.marthastewart.com/275020/pet-crafts-for-kids#/200849?xsc=eml_pet_2012_04_04&om_rid=NsgvVu&om_mid=_BPfElWB8hoFOHT

You’ve still got time to enter to win our Easter giveaway…

To be eligible for the box of homemade vintage butterscotch, participants must “Like” the Zeke’s Facebook fan page and Tweet the following to Zeke’s Twitter page: “What’s your best memory with butterscotch?” Leave a comment here and/or like the Have Dog Blog will Travel Facebook page, too to keep us in the loop.

Contest ends April 8 at midnight PST.

 

and here’s a yummy recipe for dog cookies with carob which are non-toxic unlike chocolate…

Carob-Oat Cookies

  • 1/2 cup brown rice or oat flour (wheat flour can give some dogs an upset tummy)
  • 1/2 cup carob powder
  • 1/2 cup whole rolled oats
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 3/4 cup carob chips
  • water to mix

1. Preheat oven to 350°F.
2. Mix all ingredients together in a large bowl, adding water slowly until the dough sticks together (enough to form solid scoops).
3. Scoop out tablespoon-size balls of the dough onto a cookie sheet lined with parchment paper.
4. Bake for 10-12 minutes.
5. Cool and refrigerate for up to a week.
(Makes 30-40 cookies.)

Don’t have time for homemade dog cookies? Melt some carob chips to dip your dog’s favorite biscuits into instead. Cool the chocolate-dipped biscuits on wax or parchment paper before serving.

Tip:  Since carob chips don’t contain as much fat as chocolate, they don’t melt as easily. To help them melt, add a spoonful of virgin coconut oil, which also has multiple health benefits for your dog.

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Filed under breeds, bunny rabbits, dog treats, dogs, Easter, family friendly, Martha Stewart, nanny dogs, Uncategorized

turkey dinner tips for chow hounds

That big turkey dinner won’t just put you to sleep this year; it’ll also cost you an arm and a wing. According to a recent survey by the American Farm Bureau Federation, the price of a traditional Thanksgiving dinner will rise 13 percent this year. That means an average meal for 10 could set you back $49.20, up $5.73 from 2010.

Tom Turkey is the main culprit behind the biggest increase in 26 years. A 16-pound bird will run $21.57, up more than 22 percent from last year.

Note, we bought a small turkey from Safeway for $5… we had to spend $25 to get it but they had plenty of turkeys on display.  I’d say, shop around and look at coupons to get the best deal. Of course, if organic is the only way to go, then you are going to spend a lot more than $5 for a turkey.

a seriously doggie dream turkey, bacon wrapped turkey, oh my…

http://www.squidoo.com/bacon-thanksgiving-recipes

Note: You  might consider NOT eating turkey this year and having a Vegan or Vegetarian meal instead.

http://vegetarian.about.com/od/shoppingproducts/tp/Vegetarian-Turkey-Subsitutes.htm

And if you don’t want to share any of your turkey meat with your dog, you could always give them Honest Kitchen’s Keen made with cage free turkey, gluten-free.

Dehydrated cage-free turkey, organic oats, potatoes, organic flax, carrots, cabbage, alfalfa, organic kelp, apples, honey, garlic, rosemary, tricalcium phosphate, choline chloride, zinc amino acid chelate, vitamin D3 supplement, vitamin E supplement, potassium iodide, potassium chloride, iron amino acid chelate, copper amino acid chelate.

My dog eats better than I do… If your dog is anything like Cici, she will eat until she explodes. When giving treats and pet food, don’t overdo just because you have had a little too much holiday cheer… spiked eggnog, wine or whatever.

Here are some turkey dinner tips for pets 

From Lucy Postins, CEO of The Honest Kitchen:

Sharing a moderate amount of holiday leftovers with your pet can be a great way keep her included in the festivities. There are lots of ‘people foods’ that are fine for most pets to eat, and they can add some healthy variety and extra nutrition to her regular meals. Here are some seasonal holiday ingredients that can be added safely to your dog’s usual fare to make her feel special and part of the family.

Be sure that guests understand what foods you do and don’t want your pet to be fed. If she’s hanging out with the guests, a ‘no scraps’ rule might be simpler to enforce than trying to train guests on which foods are pet-safe.   Reassure and confine your pet appropriately to help reduce stress, especially if she’s likely to help herself to food from unattended plates.

Don’t switch diets when you travel, and also be sure to prevent pets from gorging excessively on holiday leftovers, which can trigger GI upset and pancreas problems when fed in excess. If your pet gets into the holiday trash or decides to counter surf at your host’s abode, keep a close eye on him for signs of bloating or impaction (cooked meat bones can be especially tempting and problematic during the holidays). For general gorging and overindulgence, the homeopathic remedy Nux vomica is worth considering.

Fresh, growing wheatgrass (available from many health food stores) is a good option and well worth the investment. You could also add a little fresh mint or parsley to his food, to help settle the digestive system.

If you do decide to share holiday foods with pets, here are some specific guidelines…

Turkey, Ham, Prime Rib and other meats. These can all be added to Fido’s food in moderation. The key things to remember are that dogs should never be fed any type of cooked bones because they can splinter and damage or impact the GI tract.  Too much fat and gristle can be problematic and can lead to pancreatitis, which is very painful and potentially dangerous. Try to avoid prepared meats that have added nitrites and preservatives if possible. Whenever you can, choose free-range, natural and grass-fed meats, which are better for you and your pet as well as the animal who provided the meat in the first place.

Green Bean Casserole. A natural creamy sauce with the green beans is okay in small amounts, but don’t include the onion topping. Alternatively, just add some fresh raw or cooked green beans to your dog’s usual food. Most dogs love the naturally sweet taste – just be sure to trim them to a manageable size for smaller dogs.

Sweet Potatoes. These are an excellent source of beta carotene and make a highly nutritious meal addition for dogs. Steamed or baked sweet potatoes are ideal; raw root vegetables can be difficult to digest unless completely pulverized in a blender or food processor. Avoid giving your dog the kind of holiday-themed sweet potato side dishes that contain lots of maple syrup, melted marshmallows or candied nuts.

Cranberries are a great addition to your pet’s meals at any time of year and especially during the holidays. Many dogs enjoy fresh cranberries but cranberry sauce and jelly can be full of sugar and other ingredients that Fido doesn’t need. Dried cranberries are a nice alternative, provided they don’t have lots of added sweeteners. Cranberries contain natural compounds that can help prevent bacteria from adhering to the bladder wall, so they are an excellent choice for cats and dogs who are prone to urinary tract infections.

Pumpkin & Squash are great foods to share with cats and dogs in moderate amounts. Most pets love the taste of these nutritious, fibrous vegetables. If you’re making a soup, consider setting aside some of the gently cooked cubes of squash before you begin adding wine, cream, onions and other less pet-friendly ingredients to the mix.

Winter greens like chard and kale are a super source of vitamins and antioxidants. Brussels sprouts and cabbage are also loaded with nutrients, but they tend to cause gas. These can be added raw, lightly steamed or sautéed. Avoid serving your pet large amounts of winter greens that contain lots of added salt, wine, soy-sauce or butter.

White potatoes are fine in moderate amounts. They contain fiber and minerals. Try to avoid serving your pet potato dishes that are prepared with lots of cream, ranch dressing, oil or butter. Potatoes provide a good source of Vitamins B3 and B6, Vitamin C, Potassium, Iron, Copper and Fiber.  Potatoes have been associated with some adverse publicity in the past due to their content of glycoalkaloids, which can develop in the stems, shoots and green parts of the skin of potatoes that are improperly stored and where the skin is subjected to excessive or prolonged exposure to light. The shoots and green parts of potatoes should not be consumed by people or animals for this reason and should be removed before serving.

Stuffing and corn pudding  should be avoided for most pets, because they tend to contain onion and sometimes raisins, as well as ingredients like bread and cornmeal which aren’t very nutritious and can actually exacerbate ear infections and skin problems.

Desserts and Cheeses should be avoided too, because they can cause tummy upsets, especially when eaten in excess.

Relishes, pickles and sauces are also best left out of your pet’s bowl because they tend to contain heavy spices, sugar, onion and other ingredients than can unsettle their GI tract.

The following foods are toxic to dogs and cats and should not be offered in the form of leftovers or people-food additions to her usual meals: onions, chocolate, macadamia nuts, grapes, raisins & candies containing the sweetened xylitol.

If you do decide to share your holiday meals with your dog or cat, ensure that you make additions gradually to ensure he or she can tolerate what you’re serving. Don’t allow your pet to gorge excessively either, because this can lead to health problems such as pancreatitis and bloat. If you do have an incident where your pet gets up on the counter or into the holiday trash and consumes a large amount of leftovers, keep a close eye on him. The homeopathic remedy nux vomica can be helpful for the side effects of minor overindulgences but if you notice any sign of bloating, vomiting or other digestive problems such as diarrhea or constipation, a visit to the vet office is recommended, without delay.

And here’s a great idea from our good friends at BadRap… Thanksgiving Stuffing

http://badrap-blog.blogspot.com/2009/11/thanksgiving-stuffin.html

Now back to the people fixin’s portion of our post…

If you’re a perennial chef, or just cooking your first turkey dinner, consider the following tips to avoid economic indigestion.

1. Smaller Can Be Better
If you’re not a fan of leftovers, buying a smaller turkey will save you some cash, since guests often fill up on side dishes anyway.

2. Buy Early
Got extra space in your freezer? Then buy the bird now. Supermarkets tend to stock up early, then offer some excellent prices per pound. Shop early sales and keep an eye out for printable grocery coupons at websites like CouponSherpa.com.

3. Go Traditional
You can either end up with a wine cellar full of hostess gifts or ask guests to bring their favorite dish instead of a bottle. If you’re cooking the big bird, they might be willing to help with the smaller sides.

4. Be a Borrower
Borrow serving dishes and specialty cookware, instead of purchasing them. That particularly applies to that tin-foil turkey roaster you end up buying each year to avoid cleaning. If you don’t feel like scrubbing into the night, try this Cooks.com recipe for roasting the perfect bird in a brown paper bag.

5. Bulk Up Your Drink Purchases
Stock up on wine and beer from bulk retailers like Costco. They have a great selection and offer deals of up to 30-percent less than grocery stores.

6. Bring Nature Indoors
Use decor inspired by nature, like pine cones and intertwined twigs. Pumpkins spray-painted gold offer a festive touch, one that would cost over $30 if purchased at a specialty store. Plus, they’re cheaper after Halloween. Or you could cut holes in fruit, insert tealights, and create a natural and inexpensive centerpiece. Check out FreshHomeIdeas.com for more concepts.

7. DIY
Avoid prepared foods, which are typically marked up over 40 percent. Besides, you didn’t really believe boxed stuffing tastes as good as the real stuff.

8. Save at Dollar Stores
Buy paper goods, napkins, favors, etc. at dollar stores. You’d be surprised how many party fixings you can buy for just $1 apiece.

9. Do Your Own Prep
Buy your veggies whole and do the prep yourself. Pre-cut and pre-sliced produce are more expensive and often not as fresh. You can enlist a friend to help handle all the prep and chat while working.

10. Homemake Desserts
Pre-made desserts are marked up 100 percent, so it really pays to make your own. Try this Old Fashioned Pumpkin Pie recipe from SimplyRecipes for down-home goodness.

11. Stick to Your list
It’s easy to get caught up in the holiday spirit while shopping for Thanksgiving goodies, and supermarkets guide you in the direction of overspending with these sneaky strategies. Before heading to the store, make a detailed list of what you need and stick to it. And also fix yourself a sandwich; there’s nothing more dangerous than holiday grocery shopping on an empty stomach.

Andrea Woroch is a consumer and money-saving expert for Kinoli Inc.

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Filed under badrap, food, four paws up, Happy Thanksgiving, holiday tips, turkey, Uncategorized

Monterey pet friendly…

The Mariposa Suites is right across the street from the very pet friendly Del Monte Shopping Center, with Whole Foods, and there are even stores that allow pets such as Border Express, they rock, and the Apple store. Not only was Cici allowed but greeted and welcomed most places and even took a snooze or two on the comfy outside couches when the sun was warm.

Mariposa is a luxury boutique hotel that is affordable. It has 50 elegant rooms and hotel suites, a lovely orange lobby, with comfortable chairs and a chandelier. It is a very nice upscale property with swimming pool, king size bed suites (where we stayed), with couch, desk for computer, two televisions, lovely chair for desk and fireplace (gas), gorgeous view of swimming pool area… smoke free property and eco friendly, with THE very best spa bath products … body butter, body wash, shampoo and conditioner …

there is a very nice grassy area to walk pooches… so far, they do not offer any pet amenities but are working on getting some.

The place is amazingly quiet, very very quiet…considering the location, on the corner of a very busy street.

All of the rooms are pet friendly and we stayed on the second floor, up the elevator…

They offer a delicious breakfast buffet filled with different types of danishes, muffins, breads, waffles, yogurts, fresh fruits and more plus the hot coffee, tea and hot chocolate.

Mariposa also offers some wonderful packages including the Monterey Bay Aquarium package and others.

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The beaches in Monterey are pet friendly, dogs are supposed to be on leashes but they tend to run free.

There are several wineries in the area but do not yet know if they are dog friendly.

The Monarch butterflies and Gray whales are fun attractions at various times of the year.

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Filed under California, Monterey, pet friendly lodging, pet travel